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nam26b
10-07-2002, 12:02 PM
Anyone know of a slow-drying medium, the slower the better? I can't paint for more than 2-3 hours at a time during the semester, and and I'd like the paint to be wet when I go back after a day or two.

Any help appreciated,

Nathan

scottb
10-07-2002, 12:17 PM
I believe poppy seed oil makes a good retarder. Possibly a mix hald and half mix of poppy oil and mineral spirits.

Grumbacher's Oil Painting Medium Medium II is also a good slow drying painting medium - not sure of the exact formula in it, though.

Cheers.
Scott

Andrew
10-07-2002, 12:28 PM
Try Copal Medium, it slows drying time. I have also heard that poppy seed (like Scott said) and sesame oil slow drying time.

Andrew

artbabe21
10-07-2002, 01:22 PM
Walnut oil slows drying AND has the benefit of being non toxic and you can also clean your brushes with it...made by M. Graham

Titanium
10-07-2002, 01:24 PM
Nathan,

change your paints to a walnut binder - Mr.Grahams
and use no paints with a drier - cobalt,manganese or
lead.

For a medium - 1/3 stand oil ,2/3 walnut oil.

An absorbent canvas will also seem to have faster drying
paint ,something to be aware of.

The stand oil returns the strength equivalent of linseed
oil back to the walnut oil.Use the medium only in the last
coats and sparingly.

Only the overcoat needs to be slow drying or use medium.

Hope this helps.
Titanium

* For a stiffer and resin containing medium, see Kremer
for Alkyd GG [ has no drier ] and can be thinned with
2/3 walnut oil [ stand can be introduced to help keep
the alkyd resin flexible.

The zinc oxide / titanium blend of white works best with
walnut oil.The walnut oil resists the hardening factor of
the zinc oxide action on the oil coat.

scottb
10-07-2002, 01:32 PM
Originally posted by Andrew
Try Copal Medium, it slows drying time.


Copal accelerates the drying time ...

Cheers.
Scott

Wes Hyde
10-07-2002, 01:52 PM
What would a person extremely allergic to walnut oil use?

Wes

artbabe21
10-07-2002, 02:02 PM
Originally posted by Wes Hyde
What would a person extremely allergic to walnut oil use?


wow, that's a new one Wes.....here it's non toxic and you have reactions to it. Sheesh, it never fails....I was feeling an irritation
in my throat a few times when I painted and thought, hey...it's only pigment & binder.....how can this be causing irritation but guess it doesn't HAVE to be toxic to be allergic to......sorry I can't help with an answer:)

Wes Hyde
10-07-2002, 02:25 PM
Cathleen, if you're having irritation--particularly in your throat--when you use walnut oil based paints, then I strongly urge you to discontinue its use. I'm highly allergic to nuts and bees. In fact, I carry an EpiPen for anaphylaxis. I bought a big tube of titanium white a few months back, grabbed the wrong one and didn't notice until I got home. I'm a major label reader, so I noticed it contains walnut oil; I've been too afraid to use it--haven't even removed the lid. Any Colorado artist (or anyone who wants to drop by from another state) who'd like to come share a cup of coffee with me can have it. That's an open offer. :-)

Wes

nam26b
10-07-2002, 04:25 PM
Wow, thanks for so many replies.....except for the person who mentioned Copal......;) kidding.


anyway, bought 4 tubes of M. Graham and some walnit oil at the book store.....I should say I student-charged them.....I don't have to pay until the end of the year. I'll try these.

Thanks a lot everyone,

Nathan

Titanium
10-07-2002, 04:28 PM
Wes,

does Sunflower Oil affect you ?
One of the English firms uses Sunflower.
Daler Rowney.

Or Poppy or Safflower or Grapeseed ?

I have used a 1/3 stand oil ,2/3 sunflower
as medium,it works.

What I left for Nathan would apply to
sunflower,poppy,safflower and Grapeseed.

Note Grapeseed and Sunflower have no
historical track record,they are however
drying oils - slowly drying though.
Hope that helps.
Titanium

Wes Hyde
10-07-2002, 04:34 PM
Excellent, Titanium! No, no allergy to sunflower oil, or any of the others listed.

Thanks,

Wes

cobalt fingers
10-07-2002, 06:12 PM
poppy and or some linseed plus and this is important!

OIL of Cloves!

just use a little and don't worry-it's fine

your Aliz Crimsom will be wet for 4 weeks!

Wes Hyde
10-07-2002, 06:34 PM
Tim, oil of cloves sounds great--aroma therapy while you paint. lol

Thanks,

Wes

Leopoldo1
10-07-2002, 10:52 PM
Originally posted by scottb


Copal accelerates the drying time ...

Cheers.
Scott [/B]

It is a common mistake! Copal is a resin that needs a vehicle, an oil, pick from the oil choices for this resin. Cobalt drier is a different animal, and accelerates drying and is not a good choice for speedy things up, there are better options!........L

scottb
10-08-2002, 12:28 AM
Originally posted by Leopoldo


It is a common mistake! Copal is a resin that needs a vehicle, an oil, pick from the oil choices for this resin. Cobalt drier is a different animal, and accelerates drying and is not a good choice for speedy things up, there are better options!........L

Of course! See my original post, where I mentioned copal "medium", not the resin. Most mediums made with copal do, indeed, accelerate drying. Of course, this implies a drying oil.

I should have clarified this in my second post - Copal by itself, in resin form, is obviously of little use to anyone.

Cheers.
Scott

Andrew
10-09-2002, 02:00 PM
Originally posted by scottb


Copal accelerates the drying time ...

Cheers.
Scott [/B]

My error. This question seemed serendipitous. I have felt the desire to go back to oils after ~15 years and had looked back at my notes from a workshop I took back in 86 (or was it in 87?). Anyway, the host had us use a combination of copal and linseed oil. From my notes it stayed quite pliable for the 4 day course.

Previous to that I had only used Stand Oil and Linseed Oil as mediums. I obviously misinterpretted my own notes, or failed to remember comparing straight linseed with the blend.

Sorry 'bout that Chief.

Andrew

tbezesky
10-09-2002, 03:34 PM
I am investigating the Heat Set Oils, which stay wet indefinately until you apply heat.

Watch posted Subject: Genesis Heat Set Oils

http://www.genesisartistcolors.com/

Tracy

nam26b
10-17-2002, 11:06 PM
Well, just wanted to let you know that, thanks to Titanium's direct reccomendation, Verdaccio/Michael's inderect reccommendation, and local availability, I did buy 5 tubes of M. Graham, and they seem to have the ideal drying time for me.

The umber dries in about 2 days but can be extended to 4 with just a drop or two of walnut oil. Cadmiums take 4-5 days, wich is about what I was looking for.

I also like the fact that you can use the walnut oil to clean the brushes, so it's biodegradable and is one less polutant I'm sending out into the world.

Anyway, thanks a lot for the advice everyone,

nathan