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mame
06-03-2001, 08:15 AM
Okay all of you master chemists:

Bought a gallon of "economy" gesso. Has been working just fine. Have had it about three months, it's about half gone.

All of a sudden, IT SMELLS LIKE SOUR MILK MIXED WITH A DRY MARTINI AND HARD BOILED EGGS LEFT OVER FROM EASTER.

Even after applying to canvas and letting sit for a spell - the canvas reaks to high heaven. Smell-a-vision art.

Any ideas how to save what's left?

Cindy
06-03-2001, 08:45 AM
Mame,

I heard that happens because bacteria get in there - just like with the milk. How can you stand the smell? I think you will have to toss it... http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/frown.gif

Cindy
06-03-2001, 08:53 AM
I bet they'd know the answer for this at:
http://studioproducts.com/forum/forum.html


http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/biggrin.gif

mame
06-03-2001, 09:15 AM
Yeah, didn't think of them. Just posed my question over there. I think you're right though. Will probably have to dump.

GC
06-03-2001, 11:40 AM
There is a pretty good thread on it in the oil forum

About Gesso (http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/Forum3/HTML/000658.html)

Ginette

GC
06-03-2001, 04:05 PM
Originally posted by mame:
Ginette - tx for the link. Read the whole thread. The garbage man is gonna love me.

Also - got a quick response from "the man over there" Same suggestion. I asked about adding a touch of bleach and it's a big no no. Creates some kind of gas... Am very paranoid re chemicals/mediums/dryers, etc. Had a studio fire. My painting - yes I said painting, NOT oily rags, spontaneously combusted. Honest. The Fire Chief told me so...

What a geat story.
I would get a blast out of spending some time in your studio. :-)

Ginette

mame
06-03-2001, 04:43 PM
GC - smile when you say "studio". I actually have two, ahem, "studios". Indoors is a door precariously perched on a bookcase made from cinder blocks. It shares space with my bed. Very convenient. I roll out of bed turn around and there I am! Work in acrylics at this state of the art location.

My studio away from home is the garage - one fourth of the garage that is. Work in oils out there. Ah, the romance of it all.

The studio fire was in graduate school - individual studios along a long hall. It was the first time the brand new fire extinguishing system had been tested. I lost everything. Others suffered some water damage but thankfully none of their work was damaged. 2am in the morning got the call. No one was amused to say the least

mame
06-04-2001, 12:43 AM
Ginette - tx for the link. Read the whole thread. The garbage man is gonna love me.

Also - got a quick response from "the man over there" Same suggestion. I asked about adding a touch of bleach and it's a big no no. Creates some kind of gas... Am very paranoid re chemicals/mediums/dryers, etc. Had a studio fire. My painting - yes I said painting, NOT oily rags, spontaneously combusted. Honest. The Fire Chief told me so...

JaneS
06-04-2001, 09:21 AM
Originally posted by mame:
GC Work in acrylics at this state of the art location.

My studio away from home is the garage - one fourth of the garage that is. Work in oils out there. Ah, the romance of it all.


ooooooohhhh...I got a good laugh this morning. http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/biggrin.gif Please understand... I relate TOTALLY. In fact, my situation is probably even worse. Art paraphernalia has overtaken a corner of my dining room. The artbooks are lined up nicely on the buffet, but the rest is a mess. There's no place else to go! What's a person to do?? http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/frown.gif It is a major frustration to me constantly. ggggrrrrrrrr Thanks for reminding me; I am not alone. http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif ---Jane

mame
06-04-2001, 09:34 AM
You can make art anywhere, don't you think? Sometimes the adjustments you have to make point you down interesting transitional paths.

An artist friend recently asked me to share studio space she had just built on her property. State of the art space, plumbing, everything. An artist's dream. I moved in, set up and then proceeded to continue to work at home. I moved out two weeks later. I learned a valuable lesson - I have to live where I work and work where I live. Now if we could just find New Yorkish lofts to live in.....