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View Full Version : You Guys Gotta Check This Out!!!!


crumbedbrains
10-04-2002, 11:06 AM
Thank You Linoxyn for showing me this link of Andrew Hemingway's work!! . . I'm saying this seriously, you may have changed the way I think about the limits of pastel. The high tide mark has just been re-defined for me. This is the most amazing Pastel work I've seen.

Had to share this with the rest of you.

Make sure you check out the sizes of some of his paintings . .very small to very large.

http://www.godardgallery.com/heming.htm

Now the search is on . .I gotta know more . .gotta learn more about his techniques, preparation of boards etc. I've done a search and can't find any more on this amazing artist.

Can anyone help?? PLEEEEEEASE

Signed,
Desperate

maverick
10-04-2002, 11:31 AM
I don't know if this helps Crumby, but here is what I came up with.

http://www.ludorff.com/ap/hemingway1e.html

Aha! He wrote about his work in The Pastel Journal http://www.pasteljournal.com/backissues1999.htm Unfortunately, that back issue is sold out :crying:. Maybe someone has a spare copy?

chookbrown
10-04-2002, 12:11 PM
Here's one Desperate...... ;)

Is it the same Hemingway??? (http://www.ithaca.edu/handwerker/news/200108/hemingway.htm)

Chook:D

jackiesimmonds
10-04-2002, 12:14 PM
I visited an art fair/exhibition some years ago, and saw this guy's work. I remember a HUGE painting, in pastel, a still life, and all I can tell you is that I really thought it was a massive photograph until I went up close. The picture, perhaps because of its size, fascinated me, I was mesmerized. I wouldn't normally take a second glance at such detailed work, so photographic, because I truly cannot see the point when the camera does just as good a job. I prefer more painterly paintings. However, I had to confess that the guy's sheer technical ability made my hair curl.

I don't have anything on him in my collection of brochures and catalogues, but I must have had at some point. (Probably someone "borrowed" the brochure) because I do remember reading that he takes months over each piece, and goes into an almost-meditative state in order to paint with such detail and accuracy. He is a bit of a recluse, very religious and very private I believe, and there is certainly a kind of contemplative feel to the images. I doubt you will find anything about his methods, frankly, given the type of man he apparently is.

I will keep on searching here, if I come up with anything I will let you know. But now you know someone who has stood in front of an actual Hemingway and been awed despite herself!

Jackie

jackiesimmonds
10-04-2002, 12:30 PM
look at the large version of this .... and weep, Crumby.

http://www.hammergalleries.com/ConArt/ConArtThumbnail/hemingway.htm
That gallery has a profile of him too. Doesn't tell you much tho.

The gallery that represented him when I saw his work was Brian Sinfield of Burfod, Oxford - www.briansinfield.com. They might have some brochures of his work to send to you - if they were feeling kind.

Otherwise, the only thing I can find is that he was born, and possibly still lives, in Yorkshire, England, but I am afraid that isn't precise enough info to track him down. Sorry.

Jackie

Rick R
10-04-2002, 01:46 PM
Wow! Pretty amazing work, but I too am not a huge fan of ultra-realism. I come from a photography background, and if I wanted results like that, I'd go back to it.

Still, the technical skill of this artist is beyond amazing.

- Rick

jackiesimmonds
10-04-2002, 02:21 PM
Different strokes for different folks, I suppose. I used to take Pastel Artist International mag, and found that Americans really LOVE photorealism in their art, much more so than is enjoyed here in the UK.

I think Hemingway's paintings do hit you at another level, however. It is hard to explain. You had to be there!

Katherine J
10-04-2002, 03:35 PM
Wow! Pretty amazing work, but I too am not a huge fan of ultra-realism. I come from a photography background, and if I wanted results like that, I'd go back to it.

Still, the technical skill of this artist is beyond amazing.

- Rick

I'm with you and Jackie on the photorealisim, but still this is amazing work to look at and wonder about. Jackie's description of him was interesting.

Charles Perera
10-04-2002, 06:10 PM
His Bio.

http://www.hammergalleries.com/ConArt/Bios/hemingway-bio.htm

Charles

TeAnne
10-04-2002, 06:15 PM
He sure is a fine artist. I like but I don't. (Might as well take a photo, know what I mean. ) I could never do such beautiful work, I know that you could Tom. Go for it. I did a few searches but found nil.

chookbrown
10-04-2002, 06:29 PM
Originally posted by TeAnne
(Might as well take a photo, know what I mean. )

see another one baggin photorealists....you gotta be one to know what a kick we get out of it......it's the personal challenge it's not about the finished product....that is how sick and twisted our perfectionist mindset is.......sure one click of a camera and you have the pic.....but how can that compare to 100+ pure torturous hours spent trying to capture what the camera does in an instant....yes it's insane but we love it......

Just my 2cents.....

Chooky:D

KarenU
10-04-2002, 06:34 PM
Hey Crumby....I can understand why you like his work...you share very similar styles in terms of hyper-realism. His work is beautiful, however, yours is just as amazing to look at. I wonder if you appreciate his work as much due to the difference in subject matter? Have you tried doing a still life? I'm looking in my crystal ball.....yes....I think I can see a still life in your future!! :D

In any event, I think you are just as talented as Andrew Hemingway and who knows...he may be perusing your work and thinking the same of you!!

Birdie
10-04-2002, 07:12 PM
Crumbie,
You are all most there....it won't be long. I haven't taken the time to read all these post on this thread so I am sure someone else has told you this..:D
I will keep my eye open on another artist here in usa I just can't remerber his name right now but when I have more time I will pass it on to you. He does people with surrounding objects in the painting ( settings I guess I would say not just the faces) his work is outstanding too..


Birdie:rolleyes:

Birdie
10-04-2002, 07:21 PM
Originally posted by chookbrown


see another one baggin photorealists....you gotta be one to know what a kick we get out of it......it's the personal challenge it's not about the finished product....that is how sick and twisted our perfectionist mindset is.......sure one click of a camera and you have the pic.....but how can that compare to 100+ pure torturous hours spent trying to capture what the camera does in an instant....yes it's insane but we love it......

Just my 2cents.....

Chooky:D


True statement ...I love it....I love realism but have to force myself not to go for every detail..becauce I started painting to relax and mellow out....sometimes the drive is so great I have stop and throw away the work...(partly because I am nowhere near as good at it as some and it takes me even longer than the 100+ to get ever partly close) but the need for every detail is alway there under the surface...
Sounds like I need a support group...Sorry ;) Just got such a kick out of your post.....:D

Birdie:rolleyes:

Rick R
10-04-2002, 07:23 PM
"100+ pure torturous hours spent trying to capture what the camera does in an instant...."

It's a common mistake on these boards, well not THIS board, but on some here, to think (fine art) photography is quick. It isn't. It can take many, MANY hours (days, years) both to get the shot you're looking for and turn it into a finished print. Darkrooms are a HUGE time sink, let me tell you.

(I always prefered the dark room side myself. Very magical, beautiful forces at work.)

Anyway, I want to ammend my earlier post to make it clear that I GREATLY admire (and study) the work of realists, but making that kind of work isn't my "thing". (Not actually sure what my "thing" is yet.)

On a side note, realism seems to be extremely popular in the Drawing and Sketching forum, which really boggles my mind.

- Rick

crumbedbrains
10-04-2002, 07:49 PM
Ok, were off the subject a bit but my 2 cents.

I think there's beauty in all the forms of art I see here at WC . . I love the photography, the still lives, the more painterly styles . .the lot . .that's why I come here. I posted a photo (admittedly a poor one) in cafe the other day and got a bit of a buzz. But as Jackie said, diff'rent strokes for diff'rent folks.

For mine, as you all know, I get a buzz out of creating a photorealistic image . . . but to be honest I get just as big a buzz out of the compositonal aspects too. It's just a personal thing but I like joining various parts of my imagination and putting them down into an image that would be difficult to ever obtain photographically. I have never copied a photo verbatim . .there are always changes I make to better define the mood, the setting and, like I have said on my website . . that sense of encounter with the wildlife I paint. That's what does it for me. . . mmmmmm . . . diff'rent strokes.

I posted the link 'cause I guess I was just blown away by the pure technical ability . . not necessarily the images themselves . .you gotta admire THAT level of ability . .in any form of art.

Anyway. we digress, get out there and find me some stuff on this bloke . .we're on a mission here!!! LOL

Cheers
Crumby

chookbrown
10-04-2002, 07:55 PM
Originally posted by Rick R
"100+ pure torturous hours spent trying to capture what the camera does in an instant...."

It's a common mistake on these boards, well not THIS board, but on some here, to think (fine art) photography is quick. It isn't. It can take many, MANY hours (days, years) both to get the shot you're looking for and turn it into a finished print. Darkrooms are a HUGE time sink, let me tell you.

(I always prefered the dark room side myself. Very magical, beautiful forces at work.)

Anyway, I want to ammend my earlier post to make it clear that I GREATLY admire (and study) the work of realists, but making that kind of work isn't my "thing". (Not actually sure what my "thing" is yet.)

On a side note, realism seems to be extremely popular in the Drawing and Sketching forum, which really boggles my mind.

- Rick

Sorry Rick, wasn't meaning to bag photo art....it all takes serious time...I was being defensive with TeAnne but only half heartedly, I torment her all the time. My fault for not remembering it might offend others - we all like different things which is great.....

Colleen :D :D

jackiesimmonds
10-05-2002, 03:06 AM
Oay - I consider my wrist slapped - yes, we do digress, but that is what is so great about WC! We digress in the most interesting directions, and it is so terrific to hear voices from all over the world joining in.

Crumby your best bet is that out-of-print magazine article, clearly. I have no doubt that the magazine in question has a library of their articles - why don't you write to them, and ask them for a photocopy of that particular article? If he actually WROTE about his work, that is just what you want to read.

Otherwise - why not see if you can get hold of him directly? He is obviously working right now for the gallery in Germany - send him a letter via them, it might get to him eventually, and if he is a genuine, nice bloke, he will reply to you. Just go for it.

Charles Perera
10-05-2002, 04:46 AM
Andrew Hemingway, other than being a great artist, was a writer, a left wing political figure. He was a radical and revolted against conservative mainstream. He says about his art:


"I am not interested in the artist's medium being used as a blunt instrument. My concern is that the medium should not stand in the way of the painting, and I believe that pastel has suffered because it has a 'tool' for artists to produce wrk with an instantly recognisable technique. If I have succeeded with my pastels I have done so by rejecting formulas, patterns and techniques. In my view the medium should always be secondary to, and never speak louder than the image"

This article says- that his work is better known and more appreciated accross the Atlantic than in Britain. Andrew believes that his controversial use of pastel has set him apart from mainstream pastel work in Britain.

This article appeared in "the Artist" magazine of June,1998. address is - Sally Bulgin, The Artist, Caxton House, 63/65 High Street,Tenterden, Kent TN30 6BD., United Kingdom. I will try to send the article by some other means. Ask for a copy of this magasine from the address given . If They haven't got let me know I will send mine .

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Oct-2002/andrew_Hemingway_180.jpg,

Charles

jackiesimmonds
10-06-2002, 07:57 AM
YES!!!! That article is wonderful, Crumby, and I have a copy too. Perhaps Charles will be able to send you the pages in some way - however, any problems, just let me know, and I will call the girls at The Artist for you - I know them all, as I write for them often.

In the meantime, you will be interested to know that he said, at the time, that the board he uses is Sans Fixe - which is, if I am right, a cork surface, with the cork blasted onto the card. I am not sure if it is still made, it was around some time back, made by either Sennelier or Schmincke. He says "it is incredibly sensitive and i fyou even so much as spit on it, you change its surface. So I have to plan my picture very carefully. First I make a cartoon, taking great care and using perspective lines as well as a vanishing point, which I transfer to thin tracing paper. I then place the tracing paper on a polystyrene board and prick through the outlines with a needle. I then place the paper onto my board and dust it with off-white chalk. This classical Ranaissance method leaves a perfect image on the board oce I have joined up the chalk marks".

Best of all - no, I am gonna send you a pm about the next bit, cos otherwise this post will be too long!

Jackie

crumbedbrains
10-06-2002, 09:02 AM
Thanks Charles and Jackie,
Good start.
Got your pm Jackie . .off to go look for the book!
Thanks again!
Cheers
Crumby

LarrySeiler
10-06-2002, 09:59 AM
definitely sets the bar doesn't he! Cannot tell it is pastel.

Ordinarily, you think of particular mediums for hiding tell tale signs of its application and for me, pastel is not one of them. So he has an extraordinary technique.

thanks for sharing....
Larry

TeAnne
10-06-2002, 10:17 AM
Originally posted by chookbrown


see another one baggin photorealists....
Chooky:D

I'm sorry if you thought that. I was mainly talking about myself.

Charles Perera
10-07-2002, 05:01 AM
If you are still interested:


The Diary of Andrew Hemingway: The Making of a painting is said to be available in a signed numbered , limited edition of 500 direct from the artist, 15, at : The Old School, Radcliff Street, Skelmanthorpe, Huddersfield HD8 9AF, UK.


Charles