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Davkin
07-31-2010, 04:47 PM
Yes, I'm starting a new sketchbook. The reason being is I don't like sketchbook #4 for Graphite. I never liked the paper much in #4 because it's very rough and hard to fill with lead, though I'll still use it for charcoal and pastel. Also, as I started using #4 in the field I found that being hardbound made it a little unwieldy for open air sketching. The new sketchbook is a Canson Universal 9 x 12 spiral bound, I used it for the first time today and like this paper much better for graphite sketching. but before I show you what I sketched you get treated to a few of my infamous hiking photos.

Unfortunately due to the server migration can't upload images with narration, but I can attach them and just put all the narration here.

The hike was to Lake Solitude. Not a very long or difficult one, about 1 1/2 miles with 500ft of elevation gain, took me about 40 min. and I'm no athlete. I got up there early and it was a good thing. I had the trail all to myself and was able to sit on a rock by the lake for a good 15 min. in total peace.....then people started showing up. It got to the point of being crowded at times for the rest of the morning. The little squirrels weren't shy, the one in the photo came right up to my while I was sketching, probably looking for a handout. The second photo is Lake Solitude, but is really just a pond. Third photo is a long the trail. Same with the fourth photo. This was actually on the way back but on a detour. I love this aspen grove and hardly anybody hikes this little side trail, this is where I did my sketch today as you'll see in the next post, I had this space to myself or about 1/2 hour. In the fifth photo you can see the other reason I take this side trail back, it leads to this great overlook over Silver Lake and Brighton Ski Resort.

David

Davkin
07-31-2010, 04:53 PM
Okay, now onto my little sketching exercise. I really wanted to sketch and Aspen (Birch?) tree trunk today so I kept my eye out for one that was especially interesting. I found one with a small pine trying grown up right along side it and decided that would be my sketch today. Unfortunately the spot I had to sit in while sketching was heavily vegetated which meant lots of bugs. I was being constantly harrassed and so could only stand it for about 20 min. You can see as you get lower on the paper in the sketch the sketch gets looser and looser, thank the bugs for that. :lol: I took lots of ref photos so I might do a detail drawing of this micro-scene in the "studio" some day.

David

robertsloan2
07-31-2010, 04:53 PM
David, these photos are spectacular! You have an eye for beautiful scenes and compose them so well. May I draw from these photos? I couldn't hike like that to save my life, have some pretty severe mobility limits, so don't run down your athletic capacity. If you can climb for 40 minutes and think of it as no big deal, you're doing great.

Looking forward to seeing your sketch in the next post. I hope the new sketchbook's a good one for pencil drawing.

Davkin
07-31-2010, 04:55 PM
You snuck your post right in there Robert! :lol: Of course you can use my photos for anything you want, I know you'll do something good with them. :D Yes, I like the paper in this sketchbook much better for graphite. Another nice thing about this book is the pages are perforated so if I want I can easily remove a sketch.

David

robertsloan2
07-31-2010, 04:56 PM
Your sketch is great! I like the little pine growing up next to the big aspen or birch. I think they're pretty similar in their bark, don't know enough about trees to tell which is which. On top of that I think there's different kinds of birches.

One thing I found helped a lot when sketching fast - using a soft pencil like a 4B or softer. I'll get middle tones in by smudging and get in accent darks and a full tonal range shows up very quick. With hard pencils I tend to noodle a lot over details and take longer to draw, unless I'm just doing a sketch to go under painting or inking in which case it'll just be a quick set of guide lines.

Thank you! Your sketchbook does look like it works a lot better. Also having perforated pages is a comfort. I know I can pull things out if I want.

Thing is, I never do even though I can. Unless someone buys a drawing and I pull it out to give them, the perforations are just there to give me confidence. I've gotten to where I like keeping my mistakes, they help me figure out how to improve on them and occasionally only take a tweak to turn good.

Davkin
07-31-2010, 05:06 PM
Looking in my tree book it appears that these trees are "Quaking Aspens". They do look very similar to the Paper Birch but Utah is known for Aspens so I don't think they are Birches.

David

DrDebby
07-31-2010, 10:59 PM
We are not bored with your pictures from your hike. Beautiful area you are hiking in.

I like your sketch. You picked a great subject. And, in spite of bugs did it justice.

Davkin
07-31-2010, 11:49 PM
I did this one real quick tonight to get something done for the July Landscape challenge, about 40 min.

David

DrDebby
08-01-2010, 10:27 PM
Great fence sketch.

TaniaBee
08-02-2010, 07:48 AM
David, your photographs are beautiful - i really like that squirrel photo!! GORGEOUS.

Your sketches are fantastic - the tree and all the texture and shading is great, as well as the fence.

robertsloan2
08-02-2010, 11:52 AM
Beautiful fence drawing. I love the texture of the wood, it's so natural and three dimensional. Well done!

Thanks for mentioning the name of the trees too. Quaking Aspens - I've read about them dozens of times and never saw any. Cool!

hydgirl
08-02-2010, 12:54 PM
David - Beautiful photos! Good to see how these lovely scenes get transformed into wonderful sketches!

virgo68
08-02-2010, 08:19 PM
David your photos are great and the scenery beautiful. I got to spend some time in Denver/Boulder/Vail/Colorado Springs earlier this year which was beautiful, and met someone who told me Utah is even better. I didn't believe him but now I have seen your photos WOW!

I like the sketch of the pine and the Aspen, your ref shot is beautiful - if you don't mind can I have a go at that too sometime? Your fence sketch is great too, as I mentioned in another of your threads I think you observe your subject well and I am looking forward to you getting stronger with the darks in your drawings ;)

Davkin
08-02-2010, 09:03 PM
Debby, Tania, Robert & Hydie: Thanks very much for the kind comments.

Jackie: I'm suprised to hear someone say that Utah is more beautiful than Colorado. I'd very much like to take a trip through Central/Western CO, I think I could spent a couple weeks there and never run out of fun things to see. I love train history too and CO is full of it, lots of interesting historical sites there. Of course you can use my photos for your own projects. If I was worried about copyright on them I wouldn't post them or I'd watermark them. Nice hint at the lack of darks in my drawings. :lol: Yes, I know I need to work on that, but iun my defense in person they are a bit darker. The scanner washes them out a bit.

David

virgo68
08-02-2010, 09:23 PM
I know scanners do that and I am not being pushy (well maybe a little lol! but meant in the best possible way ;) ) but I just wanted to re-iterate how well you are doing and be "encouraging" hehehe.

We loved Colorado, don't get me wrong - it was the best time but I think all over the US you have some beautiful countryside - I have friends in the Aussie airforce over there on an exchange. They have travelled extensively through many areas and every time they post photos on facebook I ooh and ahhh over them! I hope to visit your country again in two years time (fingers crossed) and see a bit more. I'm not one for cities but I really loved the mountains, the trees, the snow, the history..... ;)

Davkin
08-15-2010, 02:44 PM
A quick sketch from the D&S weekly challenge;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Aug-2010/201970-sketchbook-05003.jpg

Spent about 30 min. on this one. Obvious perspective issues but 30 min. is real quick for this one, I just scribbled it out as best I could. This was more difficult than my typical car sketch. That arch in particular is much more complex than it appears on initial inspection.

I have to confess I switch books too. This is no longer a Canson sketchbook, it's a Strathmore series 400 spiral bound but with hard covers. The Canson had soft covers and I didn't like that so much, especially for "plein aire" but since I'd only done two sketches in the Canson I'm not going to start a whole new thread.

David

DrDebby
08-15-2010, 02:53 PM
The perspective may be a little off, but you have the essence of the doorway and building. I can see how that arch would give you fits.

virgo68
08-16-2010, 07:55 PM
David - good try, your sketchbook is exactly the place to learn new subjects like perspective - it is one of the trickiest elements of drawing to master. Much better to practise in your sketchbook than jumping straight into an expensive sheet of good paper and then being disappointed!

I'm with you - I am finding it hard to stick to a plan with my sketchbooks - I know anything goes and there are no real rules but I would like to dedicate one sketchbook to a particular style, subject or medium but I am way to impetuous for that hahaha!

Davkin
08-16-2010, 11:22 PM
Debbie, the essence is all I was after, I gave myself very little time for a complex scene.

Jackie, I actually understand perspective very well, after all I was an architectural drafting student. :) It's one thing to understand perspective and another to place the lines for a perspective sketch quickly and accurately freehand, so it's good practice for that anyway. If I was to do a larger work I would take more time to lay out the perspective lines carefully. I'm actually not worried about ruining paper, my time is far more valuable to me than any piece of paper, so it's the idea of putting ten+ hours into a major drawing before realizing it's garbage that keeps me shy about attempting one. :lol:

David

Davkin
08-21-2010, 06:44 PM
Today I traveled to a town about 25 miles West of here. I had two objectives, a car show and the "The Historic Benson Grist Mill" with hope for some sketching opportunities. The car show was a bit of a dud but I did get some decent photos to use for sketches later. The Grist Mill was a bonanza. I actually had visited the Grist Mill a couple years ago, but at that time I wasn't really into art much, let alone sketchbooks. This time I took a folding chair and a backpack full of sketchbooks and supplies. I ended up only using the 9X12 and pencils and did just one sketch;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/21-Aug-2010/201970-sketchbook-05004.jpg

I've been reading "Your Artist Brain" by Carl Purcell. This book covers much of the same ground as Betty Edwards "Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain" but it does it in a totally different way that really clicked with me, and I also really liked Purcell's "Broad Stroke" drawing method demonstrated throughout the first half of the book. So this sketch was an attempt at that style and also to pay closer attention to line and shape relationships early on in the drawing. I didn't quite make it for either, but it is an improvement I feel over similar sketches I've done in the past. The initial drawing in of the basic shapes was done with my trusty .5 mechanical pencil, then I broke out a 6B wood cased pencil, formed the tip into a chisel shape and added the values and details. Not quite the painterly look I was going for, I'll have to do some of the exercises in the book to learn how to do that. I highly recommend this book. BTW, the second half is about painting with watercolor, I haven't read that yet, but the first half alone is worth the price of admission. It's probably still worthwhile to read the Betty Edwards book, maybe even first.

Here's a photo. Now the sketch doesn't match the photo partially because I took the photo at a different angle than I sketch from, and partially because I didn't get the perspective quite right.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/21-Aug-2010/201970-sketchbook-05004-ref.jpg

The sketch took so long I lost my shade for the last half hour! :lol: I'll certainly have to go back and do some more sketching, especially since they are so receptive of artists there and even on a Saturday they don't get a ton of visiters. Hardly anybody even noticed I was there. One of the workers asks me that if I drew the bridge they recently built if I'd make her a copy so she could use it as a pattern for an embroidery. I took a photo of the bridge so maybe I'll do that before I go back.

BTW, here's the website for "The Historic Benson Grist Mill"

http://www.bensonmill.org/

David

Davkin
08-21-2010, 06:50 PM
Here are a few other photos I took while there. I have literally dozens more though. As usual, feel free to use them as you wish. I also have hi-res copys, PM me with your email and which photo you'd like and I'll send it to you.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/21-Aug-2010/201970-gm-blacksmithshoprear.JPG

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/21-Aug-2010/201970-gm-cabin.JPG

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/21-Aug-2010/201970-gm-gristmillrear.JPG

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/21-Aug-2010/201970-gm-outhouse.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/21-Aug-2010/201970-gm-wagon.JPG

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/21-Aug-2010/201970-gm-wagons.JPG

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/21-Aug-2010/201970-gm-wagonwheels.JPG

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/21-Aug-2010/201970-gm-washpan.JPG

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/21-Aug-2010/201970-gm-windmill.jpg

Davkin
08-22-2010, 12:17 AM
Did this for the D&S weekly challenge. Again I'm trying to learn the broad stock method. This is an improvement, looks more painterly but a little too scribblely. Spent about 25 min. on it.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/21-Aug-2010/201970-sketchbook-05005.jpg

David

jacquip
08-22-2010, 06:41 AM
Dave these new sketches are looking really good. It is really hard to try and new technique but keep at it, it certainly is coming along. I really like your Historic Mill Sketch, looking good :) Your sketches for the weekly D&S are good too.

Your pics are wonderful. If its okay I might have a try of a couple of those old buildings myself.

robertsloan2
08-22-2010, 02:25 PM
David, wow! Great collection of new photos. I've stashed them all in your folder and I'm inspired, might do one or two of them today since I need to return to my pencil sketchbook to alternate them. You really caught my eye with these!

Church door sketch is gorgeous. I think most of the perspective issues are with the right hand side of it, when I block that with my hand the door seems to be in good perspective.

One thing to watch for is to jot the angles of planes accurately at the start of the sketch. I think that's probably the best fix for preventing perspective errors - not so much stop and figure out where the vanishing point is, but really pay attention to the exact angle of each edge separately even if it doesn't seem to make sense.

The one with the large building, the perspective issues are a mental flip. The roof top and edge of the roof are perfect horizontals with the paper. They would only be that if you sat right in the middle and the end wasn't visible at an angle or only a bare slice on both ends. Yet the end of the building is spot on perfect. That's one error propagating through everything else, the only error in it is one that had big consequences. The angle was probably shallower than the photo but definitely there.

I have to avoid that in cat sketches all the time - if a cat's head is at a slight angle, I unconsciously line up the eyes against the bottom of the page instead of at right angles to a line drawn through the nose. Construction lines can help, it's easier to erase those than to redo whole detailed areas. I'm starting to put them in on some drawings. They can also look cool on a sketch if you don't erase them.

The tonal face is excellent. I like the broad stroke method you're using. I got a copy of Your Artist's Brain as part of the package when I bought the North Light VIP program in order to resubscribe artistsnetworktv for half the time when it would come up in the middle of a month I'd be short... and I am really enjoying that book. I seriously recommend it. Just last night I was reading a section on the broad stroke method, wearing down the pencil to a chisel edge and using pressure to create tone while letting strokes create the texture. It's very quick and powerful.

Your darks are getting strong and powerful. The new looseness in these sketches is beautiful. That church door at the top does have great perspective in the left hand side, especially where the stone wall juts out at a 90 degree angle to the door, it looks very three dimensional. Keep going with the broad stroke stuff, it's working well!

Davkin
08-22-2010, 02:46 PM
I think most of the perspective issues are with the right hand side of it,

Yep, that's the worst of it, seems like something was pulling my hand downward as I drew those lines.

One thing to watch for is to jot the angles of planes accurately at the start of the sketch.

Yes, that's very true. If the initial block in of the drawing is wrong no amount of work on tone and detail will save it later. That's something Carl Purcell was drive's home in his book and something I obviously still need to work on.

The angle was probably shallower than the photo but definitely there.



Actually they is a significant difference between the persective in the photo and the real perspective. I did get those wrong, (also it appears the paper was shifted slightly in the scanner.) but not nearly as wrong as the photo would seem to indicate. The perspective in that photo is seriously exaggerated. This is another good example of how you can't put too much faith in photos. In life the angles really weren't much off horizontal. Probably the biggest challenge with that drawing though was getting all the doors and windows on that thing in proportion and in the right place! I spent over a half hour just on the initial construction lines!

It's very quick and powerful

Yes, and it's very fun, though I'll consider it to be just a tool in my drawer for quick studies. I think for serious drawings I'll want a more finished look, though I have a lot more work to do to get good at it so maybe I'll change my opinion as I get better at it. I need to actually do the exercises in the books I real for once! :lol:

Your darks are getting strong and powerful.

That's probably the biggest advantage for me with this method, it kinda forces you to go darker, for that reason alone it's worthwhile for me to spend some serious time perfecting that method. I think mastering the broad stroke method gives a good foundation for developing more refined drawing skills.

David

robertsloan2
08-22-2010, 05:05 PM
You're definitely well on your way with the broad stroke method. Your latest have a great feel to them, simpler and more powerful with more tones.

I've become a recent convert to the idea of drawing the same subject multiple times. All the trial and error to become accurate at drawing from life means that when you settle down to give it time to do a refined drawing, you're that much more familiar with the subject. It's great. This kind of sketching is wonderful for doing sketch references.

JTMB
08-22-2010, 11:13 PM
I like your latest pieces here, David! The earlier images are still missing - or at least not visible to me, so I couldn't comment on them.

Davkin
08-23-2010, 12:23 AM
Well darn it, where are those photos? This thread is still short so I'll re-upload the missing photos here.

These photos go with post #1;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/22-Aug-2010/201970-solitudehike-01.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/22-Aug-2010/201970-solitudehike-02.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/22-Aug-2010/201970-solitudehike-03.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/22-Aug-2010/201970-solitudehike-04.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/22-Aug-2010/201970-solitudehike-05.jpg

robertsloan2
08-23-2010, 12:25 AM
I did a couple of your photos in my Blick sketchbook and have to thank you for this discussion too. I tried my suggestions to you because I was solving my own problems by blathering to you on how to fix them. Well, it worked. Purcell was right - even leaving construction lines in doesn't look bad. Leaving bad lines in that aren't the right ones won't ruin it either. Try just correcting the block-in and leaving all the lines in, even the mistaken ones, it'll look cool.

Davkin
08-23-2010, 12:30 AM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/22-Aug-2010/201970-sketchbook-05001.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/22-Aug-2010/201970-sketchbook-05001-ref.jpg

Davkin
08-23-2010, 12:31 AM
This goes with post #8

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/22-Aug-2010/201970-sketchbook-05002.jpg

robertsloan2
08-23-2010, 09:28 AM
Thanks for re-posting your earlier photos and sketches! I love those photos, they're magnificent. The fence sketch is very cool and I still love that big aspen, little pine sketch.

DrDebby
08-24-2010, 02:57 PM
Your sketch style is definitely changing with these last few. The mill is magnificent. Thanks for all your photo references. There is one or two that intrigue me.

Herb
08-24-2010, 08:33 PM
Nice sense of space in the fence sketch, David.

Davkin
08-24-2010, 11:04 PM
Your sketch style is definitely changing with these last few. The mill is magnificent. Thanks for all your photo references. There is one or two that intrigue me.

Thanks Debbie. I'm really not sure I really like the broad stroke method though, but I'll give it some serious practice before I decide.

David

Davkin
08-24-2010, 11:05 PM
This one is from the D&S weekly challenge. Another quick broad stroke exercise. Didn't really come out well, but that's why they call it practice. :D
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/24-Aug-2010/201970-sketchbook-05006.jpg
David

jacquip
08-25-2010, 05:55 PM
Your fence sketch is great. You are certainly tackling some of the harder images from the D&S challenge. I saw that one and cringed in fear. You have done a good job. Maybe needs some more darks but great.

Davkin
08-25-2010, 08:54 PM
Thanks Jaqui

I've decided to try and follow all the examples/exercises in the Carl Purcell book. Some he doesn't call exercises but he provides a reference photo of the subject as well as his sketch, so in those cases I'm sketching those same photos more or less in his painterly style to compare and learn. One problem however, in most of his samples the ref photos are very small. To remedy that problem I'm scanning his photos in grayscale at 300 pi then adjusting the brightness and contrast a bit and then printing them out at 100 dpi so they print out much larger.

This is the first sample attempt;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/25-Aug-2010/201970-sketchbook-05007.jpg

I only took 20 min. on this one. I did it without looking at Purcell's version, then compared afterword. Obviously his is much more accurate. There are some things he did that I like better but I actually like some of my strokes better than his. I can see doing these samples/exercises will be very helpful.

David

DrDebby
08-25-2010, 10:37 PM
The stairs are really cool. Tho' as Jacqui said, you could use some more darks. The portrait looks like you were in a hurry. I guess you were, in 20 minutes. LOL

Davkin
08-26-2010, 11:11 AM
The stairs are really cool. Tho' as Jacqui said, you could use some more darks. The portrait looks like you were in a hurry. I guess you were, in 20 minutes. LOL

Keep in mind the objective of these sketches is not to do something tight and finished. The main objective is to learn how to see, to practice getting the line and shape sizes and relationships accurate. The more of that you do the more practice you get, the sooner you get better at it, so I don't want to spend a lot of time on any individual sketch. I came pretty close to my objective with the stairs. This last portrait was way off however, I definately should have spent more time on the initial block in.

David

DrDebby
08-26-2010, 02:57 PM
Sorry. Didn't mean to offend. I guess I should not comment on portraits as I am not only, not good at doing them, but also too intimidated to try. So, my sincere apologies. You are doing way more than I in your art explorations and are doing a marvelous job of it.

Davkin
08-26-2010, 04:09 PM
You didn't offend me. Please don't misunderstand my comments. They were by way of explanation of my intent, maybe even a little thinking "out loud". Please feel free to continue to comment and critique, if we don't all do that there's no point in having a forum. The last thing I want is for people to feel like they need to tip-toe around me feelings when commenting, but at the same time I want to be able to discuss the comments, have some back and forth. That's how we best learn and progress. IMO. If all I wanted were a bunch of generic "atta-boys" I'm sure there are better forums for that, but I really do want honest feedback, that's why I'm here.

David

robertsloan2
08-26-2010, 07:27 PM
The stairway looks good, David. You got some good depth on it, I like how you did the arches in the distant background. I like the portrait too. You're getting good at that broad stroke method, it's very lively.

jacquip
08-27-2010, 10:34 PM
David I really like your portrait. It has a lot of feeling and emotion in it. I have never seen this style of drawing so am keen to keep watching your progress. Congrats for trying something new and different, not always easily done... I know :)

Davkin
09-05-2010, 07:29 PM
Finally ready to post photos from my hike from Thursday. I hiked to Red Pine lake which was a total of about 8 miles (4 miles one way) of hiking there and back. There was also a 2,040 foot elevation gain, the majority of it the last 1.5-2 miles up. It was a brutal hike and I really wasn't in any kind of shape for it. It's amazing I made it at all, many times during the last mile I just about gave up, I wish I had, I'm still paying for it. :lol: (Ibuprofen is my best friend right now. :) ) Anyway, the hike took so long and tired me so much I didn't have the energy or time to do any sketching while I was up
there. I took plenty of photos though;

One the way up, while the hike was still a mild grade and pleasant.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Sep-2010/201970-red_pine_hike-01.jpg

Also on the way up, a look over to the other side of the Little Cottonwood Canyon;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Sep-2010/201970-red_pine_hike-02.jpg

Another view of the other side of the canyon;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Sep-2010/201970-red_pine_hike-03.jpg

At this point the trail had been pretty steep for 1/2-3/4 miles. I should have ended my hike here, I still had some enegy and could have done some sketching, plenty of interesting subjects.



http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Sep-2010/201970-red_pine_hike-04.jpg

Just a little farther up the trail;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Sep-2010/201970-red_pine_hike-05.jpg

Same area again;



http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Sep-2010/201970-red_pine_hike-06.jpg

Finally Red Pine Lake. Actually it's a small reservoir and not especially interesting except for the color of the water. If the water level was a few feet higher there would have been much better photo/sketching opportunities.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Sep-2010/201970-red_pine_hike-07.jpg

Another photo on the "Lake"

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Sep-2010/201970-red_pine_hike-08.jpg

Took this one on the way back down;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Sep-2010/201970-red_pine_hike-09.jpg

And I saved the best for last, a breath taking view down the canyon and into the Salt Lake Valley.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Sep-2010/201970-red_pine_hike-10.jpg

As usual, feel free to use these photos for art reference or whatever.

David

Davkin
09-05-2010, 07:31 PM
And finally some sketches based on photos taken during the hike. This one is based on the second to last photo in the above thread, cropped in tighter;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Sep-2010/201970-sketchbook-05008.jpg

This was based on a photo taken at the lake of an old tree stump on the shore;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Sep-2010/201970-sketchbook-05009.jpg

Here's the ref photo;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Sep-2010/201970-sketchbook-05009-ref.jpg

David

DrDebby
09-06-2010, 10:34 PM
Great photos. Sorry you did more than you should. I understand the ibuprofen friendship.

The sketches are great. You've really got a knack for sketching trees, and bark. Awesome stuff.

virgo68
09-07-2010, 12:34 AM
Fantastic photos and I like your new sketches, you really are achieving more depth with your sketches now, do you feel the improvement yourself?

Shame you felt you over-did the hike, although I bet at the time you were enjoying it you couldn't imagine the soreness to come ;). I really like seeing your photos, I truly did not realise that Utah has such green, wooded areas (ignorant Aussie that I am!), I am thinking if we do get to come to the States again, it would be great to include on the itinerary if possible...... till then I am enjoying it through your work and photos :)

eyepaint
09-07-2010, 01:16 AM
Great photos of the hike. Wonderful sketches :) :) :)

robertsloan2
09-07-2010, 12:30 PM
Wow! David, these photos are amazing. I love every one of them. Such gorgeous places you saw. Thank you for wrecking your back and beating up every muscle in your body getting up there, it's magnificent!

I love the big sketch you did. It's so detailed and accurate. The values are so striking and the textures contrast so beautifully that it draws me in. Wonderful drawing, even if you had to settle down and do it at home. The tree stump came out gorgeous too. Fading out the background really makes it pop.

I'm looking forward to everything you do from the photos now, you got some incredible references and your first two drawings are stunning. You've gotten another leap in drawing skill, so keep going!

Davkin
09-19-2010, 02:04 PM
Friday night I went to Mom's for dinner to celebrate a birthday. My brother and nieces live there too so when I visit it's always occasion for us to get out our sketchbooks. My Mom heavily pruned the old willow tree in the front yard revealing a very interesting gnarled trunk and branches I had to sketch that of course.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/19-Sep-2010/201970-sketchbook-05010.jpg

This was with just an .5 HB mechanical pencil. I was losing light fast, as you can see I was detailed with the foliage at first but then as I lost light I had to go much faster and sketchier, never really finished it anyway. I took some photos so maybe I'll do a better sketch from those, though they aren't very good due to the lighting.

David

Davkin
09-19-2010, 02:07 PM
Fantastic photos and I like your new sketches, you really are achieving more depth with your sketches now, do you feel the improvement yourself?

Shame you felt you over-did the hike, although I bet at the time you were enjoying it you couldn't imagine the soreness to come ;). I really like seeing your photos, I truly did not realise that Utah has such green, wooded areas (ignorant Aussie that I am!), I am thinking if we do get to come to the States again, it would be great to include on the itinerary if possible...... till then I am enjoying it through your work and photos :)

It seems when I sit down and work from a photo I get more depth, maybe it's the time factory, and yes I do feel the improvement.

Actually, I was imagining the soreness to come while I was hiking up. :lol: I can't say the hike was all that fun either, most parts of my body were complaining during the hike as well, especially my lungs and heart.

I can't blame you for not knowing about the forest wilderness of Utah, I blame the bureau of tourism here. They only promote three things to tourists, the Mormon history and architecture, skiing and Southern Utah red rock country. I'm sure few people that haven't actually been here know they we have beautiful wooded forests as well.

David

Davkin
09-19-2010, 02:12 PM
Wow! David, these photos are amazing. I love every one of them. Such gorgeous places you saw. Thank you for wrecking your back and beating up every muscle in your body getting up there, it's magnificent!

I love the big sketch you did. It's so detailed and accurate. The values are so striking and the textures contrast so beautifully that it draws me in. Wonderful drawing, even if you had to settle down and do it at home. The tree stump came out gorgeous too. Fading out the background really makes it pop.

I'm looking forward to everything you do from the photos now, you got some incredible references and your first two drawings are stunning. You've gotten another leap in drawing skill, so keep going!

Thanks very much Robert. Very high praise coming from you.

David

DrDebby
09-19-2010, 06:30 PM
That is so cool that the family sketches together. I can see the bones of the tree in your sketch. Sometimes that's all we can get is the bones of something before we move on. The sketch with the photo you took could be used for a more finished piece if you desire, I'm sure.

JTMB
09-19-2010, 08:39 PM
Very nice landscape and botanical sketches, David!

Davkin
09-20-2010, 12:20 AM
That is so cool that the family sketches together. I can see the bones of the tree in your sketch. Sometimes that's all we can get is the bones of something before we move on. The sketch with the photo you took could be used for a more finished piece if you desire, I'm sure.

It's not as cool as it might sound. I sketch, my nieces just doodle. I've tried to teach the older one, (7 years) some drawing principles but she just isn't very receptive, usually just tunes me out. I don't have much paitence for that kind of attitude, (One reason I've stayed single and childless) so I just won't bother her anymore. I think I'll have more of a chance with the younger one in 2-3 years, she seems to have a much greater thirst for knowledge but she's a little too young to understand yet.

My Mom used to paint when I was a teenager and she just retired recently so I've been after her to get her paints out. She keeps saying she will but hasn't got around to it yet. I can't get her to even consider drawing.

David

Davkin
09-20-2010, 12:20 AM
Very nice landscape and botanical sketches, David!

Thanks John.

robertsloan2
09-20-2010, 04:26 AM
Love the strange old willow that just got pruned - looks like the trunk has an unusual bulge, or is that a branch going off behind the other one? I can see how doing detailed foliage is hard when you're going from life, there just isn't time. I haven't done detailed foliage in ages, but you manage to do it in a way that conveys masses and tone beautifully.

Davkin
09-20-2010, 07:59 PM
Thanks Robert. And yes, that is a strange bulge than then splits into two branches, something I really couldn't see that night after examining my photos. I guess I should have got up close and examined the thing while I was there. I'll be picking my brother up to go to a movie tomorrow, maybe I'll take more photos in with more light then, here's one of the photos I took that night that I made somewhat usable after a little editing;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/20-Sep-2010/201970-sketchbook-05010-ref.jpg

David

virgo68
09-20-2010, 08:31 PM
What a neat tree - seeing fairies, dryads and gnomes living in and around that one lol! Is that ivy growing up the trunk - I know some people regard it as a nuisance but I love seeing ivy trailing up something. I think the love for trees has something to do with us being an earth sign David!

Davkin
09-20-2010, 08:41 PM
I don't know if that is ivy growing up the trunk but I agree, I like to see that kind of thing. There's a tree nearby my home that is so covered in ivy that you can't see any of the trunk! The ivy looks to be at least a foot or two thick as well. The only thing wrong with this picture is that it took aggresive pruning to reveal the interesting trunk and limbs, something that doesn't happen in nature.

David

Carole A
09-20-2010, 10:51 PM
What a neat tree - seeing fairies, dryads and gnomes living in and around that one lol! Is that ivy growing up the trunk - I know some people regard it as a nuisance but I love seeing ivy trailing up something. I think the love for trees has something to do with us being an earth sign David!

It is a pretty thing to look at, but eventually the ivy will kill the tree. The ivy pulls all the moisture out of the tree and eventually suffocates it. Where I walk my dog here in town there's a large wooded area, maybe five acres, so much ivy and several dead trees in the midst. There are groups who go out regularly to pull ivy and cut it back. Same with Forest Park in NW Portland, which is said to be the largest urban forest in the country and much loved by hikers and runners.

Carole A

robertsloan2
09-21-2010, 01:07 AM
Oh wow! She reminds me of the myth of Daphne, who got turned into a tree when Apollo was pursuing her. That tree is marvelous, it's so unique. Thank you for sharing the photo. Gorgeous tree. I could so see turning it into a dryad too, or any sort of mythic or magical scene. Wonderful! Now your sketch really makes even more sense, that bulge is very unusual.

So that's where the Entwives wound up! They did like gardens after all.

Bootz
09-21-2010, 09:23 AM
I'm really enjoying looking at your drawings and photos. I'm going to need to figure out how to use my camera. I bought one awhile back and my girlfriend was the only one to use it :-0 I have a new iPad and it's excellent for looking at photos as a reference.

I'll check out the Purcell book.

Maybe the doodling niece is an abstract artist in the making. Maybe she can be taught to LOOK at the details, even if she doesn't want to include them in her drawing?

Thank you for inspiring me!:-)

Whisperwood
09-21-2010, 10:28 AM
Love your old tree David! Such character! I must do some more trees...

Beautiful_Butterflies_Studio
09-27-2010, 10:47 PM
All of these are fantastic sketches, LOVE the details and tonal structure of each drawing!!!!!

Davkin
09-28-2010, 07:25 PM
Thanks for all the comments guys.

David

Davkin
10-10-2010, 12:10 AM
It's been nearly a month since I uploaded a sketch from this book but I have a couple more to share. I did both of these with a carpenter's pencil. Yes, yet another sketching experriment. I can't say I can recommend using this pencil for the subjects I used it for. A carpenter's pencil would be more suited to less detailed subjects. This first one is an attempt at a copy of a Gil Elvgren pin up painting;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Oct-2010/201970-sketchbook-05012.jpg

Two big problems with it, one the face while credible doesn't look much like the painting. Two, the torso came out kinda long.

I did this one tonight for the weekly D&S challenge;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Oct-2010/201970-sketchbook-05011.jpg

David

flashviv
10-10-2010, 12:22 AM
Can't believe you got the level of detail you did with the carpenters pencil!

Beautiful sketch of the barn, lots of tonal value brings it out so well.

Vivien Maloney
10-10-2010, 04:44 AM
The torso does look a bit long but a very good atempt. Your barn sketch is great. You've got the values just right!

DrDebby
10-10-2010, 06:16 PM
Sounds like carpenter pencil is not a choice for portraiture. She's a lovely lady, tho' you've already commented on the long torso.

The barn and surrounding trees are splendid.

virgo68
10-10-2010, 06:44 PM
Cool! The carpenters pencil will be useful for big or very loose drawing (for example a life drawing class you usually have large sheets of cheap paper and try to draw quickly - this pencil would be an alternative to using charcoal). I like the way it looks on the second drawing - you are starting to get some darker tone into your work and it really makes a big difference visually!

Davkin
10-10-2010, 06:46 PM
Actually Debby, I think a carpenters pencil would be good for portraiture as long as it's the face only and it's at least 8x10. It wouldn't be a hyper-realistic super detailed portrait but IMO the best portraits aren't anyway. I'll have to give it a try sometime even though portraiture doesn't interest me much.

David

RainySea
10-10-2010, 08:00 PM
beautiful old barn!

loobyteacher
10-12-2010, 03:05 PM
I really like your studies

jmb57
10-12-2010, 09:41 PM
i really like your barn David.
i had a go at the same challenge.

JTMB
10-12-2010, 10:13 PM
More nice sketches, David. I particularly like the barn - very nicely done.

Davkin
10-13-2010, 12:13 AM
Thanks for the comments guys.

David

virgo68
10-13-2010, 04:18 AM
:) good stuff!

Davkin
10-15-2010, 11:13 PM
Another carpenter's pencil sketch for the weekly D&S challenge;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Oct-2010/201970-sketchbook-05013.jpg

Sketching with a carpenter's pencil is pretty fun. It helps you loosen up, (if that's your goal) and it feels kinda like sculpting.

David

DrDebby
10-16-2010, 12:57 AM
This is a cool autumn still life. Your experiments with the carpenter's pencil are enlightening.

virgo68
10-16-2010, 08:57 PM
The drawings certainly looks much more "chunky" and substantial (if that makes sense?). Maybe the word I am thinking is painterly - like when artists who paint in oils block in tone before starting on the paint?

I like the way the corn came out and the markings on the pumpkins/gourds look great.

Davkin
10-25-2010, 08:40 PM
Debby - Thanks, my experiments with the carpenter's pencil have definately been fun and interesting.

Jackie - Thanks. Painterly is definately how I'd describe it. I almost feel like i'm handling a brush rather than a pencil.

It snowed here overnight and was very gloomy and rainy and cold all day. The sun did finally come out late afternoon but it was still very cold so I decided to stay home, set up a pair on the kitchen table and see how many ways I could sketch it.

First up, three small sketches, each with different pencils, first a .5 mechanical, then a .9 mechanical and then a 2mm clutch pencil. All with HB lead.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/25-Oct-2010/201970-sketchbook-05014.jpg

Next up I did a larger sketch that took up most the page using the carpenter's pencil;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/25-Oct-2010/201970-sketchbook-05015.jpg

And finally charcoal;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/25-Oct-2010/201970-sketchbook-05016.jpg

I think I need to practice pears a lot more. :lol: The best one is probably the carpenter's pencil version, it was the funnest anyway. I'll be doing a lot of still life sketching for a while since I don't get out much during the winter and sketching from life is so much more fun that sketching from photos.

David

virgo68
10-25-2010, 08:51 PM
Interesting to make the comparisons of the three pencils - while all HB they do look different. Do you think you are finding that you have a favourite medium? The charcoal looks like a more powerful drawing but I am not sure if it just because it is a darker medium or if you are using it more confidently?

Davkin
10-26-2010, 12:16 AM
I guess my favorite depends on what I'm drawing. If I'm doing something detailed I like the .5 mechanical. For a loose sketch about 9x12 or larger I like the carpenter's pencil. When I want real dark darks I like the charcoal. I think I'll be experimenting a lot with charcoal this winter, I could see doing some dark, moody still lifes with it, maybe even in conjunction with pastel pencils for a touch of color. It's the pure blackness that gives charcoal it's power, I'm no more confident with charcoal than anything else.

David

robertsloan2
10-26-2010, 12:56 AM
Love the series of pears with different pencils, getting used to the different tones. They all have good form and great values. Gorgeous sketch for the Drawing & Sketching challenge - everything's very dimensional and well shaped, strong values, good forms - you really captured that. Well done!

DrDebby
10-26-2010, 06:30 PM
Delightful seeing your experiments with different drawing tools and the same object.

Chuckcamo
10-26-2010, 09:17 PM
Great use of the carpenter pencil, you captured the corn and pears really good.

Davkin
10-28-2010, 12:13 AM
Thanks for the comments, Robert, Debby and Chuck.

I've decided to make it a goal to do at least one sketch from life every day, even if it's just a 5 minute gesture sketch, but sketch something. Today I finally got around to sketching the sheep barn next door. I can't beleive I've been here now 3 months and am just now sketching this;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/27-Oct-2010/201970-sketchbook-05017.jpg

As you can see, we had a little snow overnight.

David

DrDebby
10-28-2010, 01:40 AM
Snow? Cool! Nice job on the sheep barn.

eyepaint
10-29-2010, 12:09 PM
Congrats on sketching daily for 3 months. Great barn (it's complicated - that's why it took you a while to feel skilled enough to try it). Snow, hey? I bought snow boots last week just to be safe....

Davkin
10-29-2010, 12:37 PM
Sorry, my post wasn't very clear. I moved into the duplex I'm now next to the little sheep farm 3 months ago and just now finally got around to sketching the barn. I haven't been sketching daily for 3 months, I'm just starting that challenge this week.

David

robertsloan2
10-30-2010, 12:01 AM
Thanks for the comments, Robert, Debby and Chuck.

I've decided to make it a goal to do at least one sketch from life every day, even if it's just a 5 minute gesture sketch, but sketch something. Today I finally got around to sketching the sheep barn next door. I can't beleive I've been here now 3 months and am just now sketching this;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/27-Oct-2010/201970-sketchbook-05017.jpg

As you can see, we had a little snow overnight.

David

Beautiful little drawing. I love the way you captured the snow and got the interesting shape of that building so accurately in its perspective. Good values. Great atmosphere.

Congratulations on the daily sketching challenge! Even if you miss a day or two, just pick it up again. Sometimes it takes a few starts to get going on it but once the habit's there (takes about three weeks) then it starts to flow easier. The quick gestures are the way to stick to it. That just rocks!

That's pretty much how I started and it just builds on itself. I also used a 4" x 6" sketchbook the first time I did it, so that made it easier to stick to it and do only one or two drawings per page. I'm up to doing big pages now but that didn't come till later.

Davkin
10-30-2010, 08:40 PM
Thanks Rob.

Here's my lame portrait attempt for the weekly D&S challenge. I only spent 30 min. on it and I'm really into doing portraits but still feel I should have done better;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Oct-2010/201970-sketchbook-05018.jpg

David

DrDebby
10-30-2010, 09:13 PM
No two ways about it, drawing people is hard. You've done well.

Davkin
10-30-2010, 11:10 PM
You're way too kind Debby.

At the last minute I got something done for the P&I monthly challenge;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Oct-2010/201970-sketchbook-05019.jpg

David

CandAlArt
10-31-2010, 12:18 AM
Wow the covered bridge is wonderful!!

robertsloan2
10-31-2010, 01:21 AM
David, I think the portrait turned out pretty well - like the way you captured the lines of the face and you definitely did get the likeness. I recognized it. Gorgeous pen and ink covered bridge, that came out so beautiful.

DrDebby
10-31-2010, 05:28 PM
That bridge is fantastic.

Davkin
10-31-2010, 10:45 PM
Thanks for the comments guys. I don't know why but ink drawings seem to usually work out pretty well for me, moreso than graphite.

Today I visited my Mom, which of course means my bro's family as well, which meant of course that the nieces and I held a group sketching session after dinner. First I sketched this little cutesy plaster stature of Frankenstien my Mom as;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-Oct-2010/201970-sketchbook-05020.jpg

My Mom really gets into decorating for the holidays so there was all kinds of craft store junk around. Next I sketched this lighted up pumpkin decoration. It had a hat with berries and leaves the brim and straw "hair".
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-Oct-2010/201970-sketchbook-05021.jpg

Niether was great work but about the best I could do with one or both nieces yelling at me to look at their drawing or asking me what they should draw every 3-5 minutes! The oldest niece finally made the connection between seeing and drawing a bit today. Usually she just draws the old symbol stuff, like houses and people and that's how she started out but then I was able to get her to draw a little from observation. She drew the mountains in a painting hanging on the wall and actually got the shapes pretty close. Then she drew a decoration hanging on the wall, the shapes were distorted quite a bit but at least they were all there and recognizable so there may be hope for her yet, it will just take time. I think seeing my barn drawing motivated her a bit.

David

robertsloan2
10-31-2010, 11:02 PM
Cool little Halloween decoration sketches. They both worked. Coolness that your oldest niece is learning to draw from life. Sascha did that once too. I think they need to know it's okay to do that, because in school they're getting taught how to draw the symbols. I just explained to her that they were different types of drawing and she goes back and forth now.

eyepaint
10-31-2010, 11:58 PM
Ok I understand. Still a barn and similar structures are difficult because they are complicated and our eye will spot if something is "off". Congrats on inspiring young artists :)

DrDebby
11-01-2010, 06:39 PM
Great sketches under trying circumstances.

JTMB
11-01-2010, 06:59 PM
Hi David,

Checking back in after an absence due to the October challenge. The covered bridge is spectacular! I grew up around a number of these in PA and many/most of them are now long gone, unfortunately. Also, I can identify with the difficulty of sketching in a crowd...when my band plays at gigs, or we're at a jam session, I try to sit down and sketch but it's a big challenge with onlookers, and all the activity.

Davkin
11-06-2010, 12:09 PM
Again, thanks for the comments everybody. I apologize for not always responding to each comment individually, there often just isn't time.

While waiting for the temps to warm up a bit before heading to the canyon i decided to take on one of the D&S challenge photos for the week, and this week it was all hands. I've never sketched a hand before, not really my kind of thing but any drawing practice if good, right?

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Nov-2010/201970-sketchbook-06022.jpg

David

eyepaint
11-06-2010, 12:35 PM
Great job! Hands are NOT easy.

Davkin
11-06-2010, 08:05 PM
Thanks EP.

Today I spent nearly 5 hours in Big Cottonwood Canyon. First I hiked up a trail I think is called the "Stairs". I've never hiked very far up this trail since it gets real steep and difficult after a certain point, not heavily used that's for sure. I saw one other person the whole time I was on this trail. On difficult thing is it got just a touch windy up at this elevation. If I'd known that I would have brought a hat with ear flaps! I hiked up to the spot before it gets real tough and did these two sketches from that spot.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Nov-2010/201970-sketchbook-05023.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Nov-2010/201970-sketchbook-05024.jpg

Neither one was particularly successful but I learned some things that will help with drawing and that's what sketching is for, right?

After the sketched I made the mistake of thinking I wanted to hike up higher than I'd ever had before on this trail.....I about killed myself in more ways than one. :lol: I did manage to get high enough to get this wonderful looking back;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Nov-2010/201970-stairs-01.jpg

There's more my story to be continued in sketchbook #6, so take a look over there, you'll get to see a pic of one of their weirdest pine trees you've ever seen.

David

DrDebby
11-06-2010, 10:04 PM
Great hand sketch.

Wonderful sketches. That's a gorgeous view.

Davkin
11-13-2010, 08:20 PM
Thanks Debby.

Just did this one for the weekly D&S challenge, about 35 min.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Nov-2010/201970-sketchbook-05026.jpg

David

DrDebby
11-14-2010, 07:40 PM
Very nicely done.

Davkin
11-17-2010, 08:39 PM
Filled up a page with quick, minimalist sketches of the owls from the weekly D&S challenge. I spent 10 minutes or less on each one.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-Nov-2010/201970-sketchbook-05027.jpg

David

Dougwas
11-17-2010, 11:33 PM
Hi David. I just looked through your sketchbook and I am impressed with your variety of subjects and pencils. I have never given any thought to drawing with a carpenter pencil before. My hat is off to you for your plein air sketches and the lengths (pun intended) that you will go for the drawing and photo references. The hand drawing looks fantastic. I think all this practice is paying off.

Thanks for the permission to use your photos for references. I greatly appreciate it, because I can't do those hikes any more.


Doug

DrDebby
11-17-2010, 11:37 PM
Nice group of owls.

JTMB
11-18-2010, 12:59 AM
Nice work on the owls, David! I'll have to go check out the references and see if I can squeeze some time in to draw them.

Joan T
11-18-2010, 03:54 PM
Love the barns and the covered bridge! Great sketches.

Chuckcamo
11-18-2010, 09:32 PM
very good quick sketches.. like the canyon sketches too..:thumbsup:

Davkin
11-20-2010, 01:55 PM
Thanks for the permission to use your photos for references. I greatly appreciate it, because I can't do those hikes any more.


Thanks for your comments Doug. I'm happy I could provide some usefull references for you. I'm afraid with the way my knees are going I won't be able to go on these hikes much longer either. :( Not being able to head into the mountains will certainly be a reduction in my quality of life, I guess that's why I take so many photos and do so many sketches while I can. If I get to the point where I can no longer hike at least I'll have my photos and art to help me re-live the experiences.

Nice work on the owls, David! I'll have to go check out the references and see if I can squeeze some time in to draw them.

Thanks John, coming from a bird man that means a lot. :)

Love the barns and the covered bridge! Great sketches.

Thanks Joan. I really like how the covered bridge came out too. I've only done pen and ink sketches so far, I think I'm going to try a pen and ink drawing here soon, see how far I can take that medium. It certainly have a particular appeal to it.

very good quick sketches.. like the canyon sketches too..

Thanks Chuck!

David

Davkin
11-20-2010, 01:56 PM
I decided to start my weekend with a sketch from the Weekly D&S Challenge, took about an hour on this;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/20-Nov-2010/201970-sketchbook-05028.jpg

David

Dougwas
11-20-2010, 03:51 PM
Wow, David! This looks great! I love the broad strokes in the shading. It suits the cat, the foliage and the background. Well done.:thumbsup:

Doug

RainySea
11-20-2010, 03:56 PM
Nice one, David! You really captured that guy! Both of the big cat drawings are really well done :thumbsup:

seejay
11-20-2010, 07:39 PM
Nice mix of sketches / subjects, David. :clap:

JTMB
11-20-2010, 08:56 PM
Very nice work on the big cat, David!

Chuckcamo
11-20-2010, 11:09 PM
the mountain lion looks great, I like your line and shading too....

DrDebby
11-21-2010, 03:51 AM
Great cat sketch. The scenery is spectacular.

virgo68
11-21-2010, 08:08 PM
Your dedication to drawing and sketching is amazing David - nice collection of work since I last checked in ;)

Davkin
12-01-2010, 08:15 PM
Thanks for the comments everyone.

I inadvertantly took a break from the forum, now I'm catching up, though none of these are very good. :lol:

I did this one Thanksgiving Day at my Mom's house. I distracted by my brother and nieces, was really hardly paying attention to the sketch I was doing.....at least that's my excuse. :lol: It's some kind of hanging candle holder my Mom has.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/01-Dec-2010/201970-sketchbook-05029.jpg

I did this one the day after thanksgiving for the weekly D&S challenge. I wanted to play with color just a bit so I used two Derwent drawing pencils, Chocolate and Ruby Earth;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/01-Dec-2010/201970-sketchbook-05030.jpg

And I did this one today for the weekly D&S challenge, very quickly just using a 2mm lead;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/01-Dec-2010/201970-sketchbook-05031.jpg

David

Davkin
12-01-2010, 08:20 PM
I think I'll be going a somewhat different direction with my sketching. I really want to learn painting but while still doing the occasional detailed drawing. This means I think I'll be doing fewer challenge sketches and my sketching focus will be on doing sketching in support of painting and drawing, in other words quick sketches to test compositions, value studies and techniques for specific projects.

David

seejay
12-01-2010, 11:21 PM
Nice update!

Good luck with the painting study.

DrDebby
12-02-2010, 12:49 AM
The candle holder in well done.

Great skull in the wall.

Marvelous landscape.

Davkin
12-02-2010, 08:34 PM
Thanks Chris, Debby.

Here is my first quick compositional sketch study for a possible detailed drawing and/or painting.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/02-Dec-2010/201970-sketchbook-05032.jpg

It's loosely based on this photo I took at the local parkway;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/02-Dec-2010/201970-sketchbook-05032-ref.jpg

As you can see I moved stuff around quite a bit and added a more interesting bridge, (ref. is from a photo I found on the internet).

More than anything I need feedback on the composition. I really don't care much for the bushy tree on the right, so I did minimize it but maybe it could be replaced with something else? I also need to figure out how to make the grassy areas in the foreground more interesting or replace the grasses with different ground cover. I don't like the plain gravel/dirt in the photo.

David

DrDebby
12-02-2010, 11:01 PM
David, what if you replaced the green monster with more trees, having the area a little more "open" rather than a dark mass of leaves?

As far as the grass goes, I like it. Tho' if you keep the picture "fall" you could put seed heads on some of the grasses making it more interesting.

My other thought was to crop the picture so the bridge is more in the lower left quadrant. Not too much further, just a little bit. Not sure if that would work with the bush on the right, or not.

What paint media are you using? Oil, acrylic or water color?

Davkin
12-03-2010, 12:16 AM
what if you replaced the green monster with more trees, having the area a little more "open" rather than a dark mass of leaves?



I don't care much for the "green monster", but not sure I want more trees there either, I think there should be some variation.

Tho' if you keep the picture "fall" you could put seed heads on some of the grasses making it more interesting

I'll have to look for some ref photos of that, now sure what that would look like.

My other thought was to crop the picture so the bridge is more in the lower left quadrant

Ya, I was thinking maybe it was just a little too close to the center.

What paint media are you using? Oil, acrylic or water color?

Acrylic. I might try to do a detailed drawing first though, but not sure this would make a good drawing. I'll do at least one or two more compositional studies though. I'm still not convinced it would even make a good painting. :lol:

David

virgo68
12-03-2010, 04:25 AM
Good luck with the new direction David, sketching with another purpose in mind is a good reason to have a sketchbook. Hope things go well with the painting...... as to the composition question - that is one of my weak points and as I don't EVER do landscapes I don't have anything constructive to offer!

Look forward to seeing what you come up with - make sure you give us a link if you post any paintings in other forums ;)

Joan T
12-03-2010, 12:07 PM
David - Good luck with the new project. While I'm out plein air painting I tend to "move things around a bit." Have fun!

JTMB
12-03-2010, 12:32 PM
Hi David,

Here are a couple of suggestions. First, for compositional studies, I often use a set of gray markers (Prisma and Pitt among others have them in both warm and cool and a range of values). The benefit of these versus pencil for comp studies is twofold: a.) They are much quicker than pencil, so you can maximize the number of studies you get done - doing four or five with variations as quickly as you can is more valuable than spending time to do one pencil sketch in the same time; b.) It is much easier to get a range of values from dark to light which helps see how the larger shapes play together better than a pencil sketch which lacks a large range of values.

As to this particular comp, I think moving the bridge away from the center is a good suggestion. I would also consider showing a hint of the path on the other side of the bridge which will move the eye around the painting more than the current comp. Even though you have the bridge there, it currently functions only as part of the overall wall of vegetation - suggesting a path beyond it will give the painting a little more sense of depth.

Good luck with the painting!

Davkin
12-03-2010, 08:43 PM
Okay, incorporating some of the suggestions I made a new composition sketch, just a quicky, mostly a line drawing except for the darkened background;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/03-Dec-2010/201970-sketchbook-05033.jpg

In spite of being much more sketchy than the first study I was actually more methodical on this one. First I made sure it conformed to the same proportions as 8x10, (the size the painting will be) and then I divided the sketch into thirds and put the middle of the bridge right on the lower left intersection of the division lines. I also got rid of much of the foreground, (eliminating a lot of the grass) and the area to the right of the main tree. One thing that concerns me is that it seems even more than before the tree and the bridge are fighting with each other to be the focal point. I think the bridge wins since it all fits in a defined area, while the tree kinda sprawls throughout the sketch, however it's trunk if a very strong, eye catching shape. I'm thinking now the trunk of the tree is going to be a stronger focal point no matter what I do, so maybe I should eliminate the bridge and just have a path winding through the scene.

What do you think?

David

DrDebby
12-03-2010, 09:03 PM
You are correct, the eye is drawn to the tree. I don't have any suggestions other than the one you already proposed, which is to down play the bridge and focus on the tree.

What drew you to this photo for a painting to begin with?

Chuckcamo
12-03-2010, 11:52 PM
I see what you mean about the focal point. Maybe depending how you shade the tree, the bridge may still be the focal point...or setting the bridge further back with a longer pathway will make it the focal point. I like the composition it looks great...:)

Davkin
12-04-2010, 12:06 AM
Thanks for chiming in Chuck. Maybe if I keep the bridge in the distance but keeping it in the dark and a bit underdefined and let the tree be the star. Probably not much reason to over think this, afterall this will be my first real attempt at a painting so it's not luckly to work out well anyway. :lol:

Debbie, the tree is the reason I took the photo in the first place, mainly for that kinda odd looking branch that turns down and runs across the middle and has those beautiful fall leaves on it, however I'm not sure a branch that crosses nearly the whole picture plane makes a good focal point. I'm afraid I picked a tough one to make a painting from, but it is just practice, and it is just paint. :)

David

Elain
12-04-2010, 12:55 PM
As the eye is drawn to the tree, I'm not sure what you would think of flipping the picture horizontally? The eye would then start at the tree and naturally then go to the right and be led more around the painting following your autumn leaves on the brach back to the tree.

Some small branchlets, or a sappling or some thing could also break the strong lines of the tree but still allow for the trunk to be seen.

As Chuck says, it also willbe affected in the way you paint/shade the trunk.

Davkin
12-04-2010, 03:42 PM
I attended a webinar on landscape painting for 3 hours today and most of it covered composition. From what I know now I think either it is impossible to use this photo to make a good composition or it's just well beyond my abilities. In fact I wonder I even have the right temperment to be a painter. :lol: Maybe I should stay focused on drawing for a good while longer. Ya, I know, I'm a flake. :lol:

David

JTMB
12-04-2010, 06:02 PM
Hi David,

I was on the same webinair, which was outstanding. Since you're just starting painting, though, I would caution you against getting turned off about painting based on the webinair. There was a TON of info in there, a lot of it fairly advanced, and starting from scratch would tend to make one's head spin. I've had three college painting courses and multiple painting workshops over the last two years and had I not had that background, I would have left the webinair with my head spinning. If you're interested in painting, I would just jump in, understanding that like all other things, it takes a lot of miles on the tires to get to anywhere near the point where Johannes is.

Davkin
12-04-2010, 06:21 PM
understanding that like all other things, it takes a lot of miles on the tires to get to anywhere near the point where Johannes

Well, I do understand that, more than ever. That's the problem! :lol: Drawing is somewhat intuitive to me and it's very convenient, no real setup or cleanup so it's easy to jump into and out of a drawing session, (which I do far to often). Painting is not nearly as simple and apparently not nearly as intuitive for me. Painting takes much more dedication than I appear to be capable of at the moment. Until I can prove to myself that I can put in the time I think I better stick with a pencil instead of a brush, that may come as soon as next month or may not happen for years, but as long as I am always doing something with art that's okay.

Now, don't get me wrong, Johaness' webinar was great and much of what he discussed is also relevant to a draftsman so I'm not sorry at all I spent the time. He's being incredibly generous.

David

WYSIWYG
12-05-2010, 01:51 AM
I will fully admit I am not terribly well versed on compositional details and just tend to go with my eye as to if I 'like' something or don't. That said I think the tree is going to be a dominant aspect but I'm not sure there's anything wrong with that or that you couldn't make it dominant-but-not-dominant by having it more shadowed with the lighting put in the 'leaf' spaces, grass and water to sort of trick the eye to mainly focus on the bridge.

I am teaching myself acrylic at the same time I'm teaching myself to draw. I work very much as you say - jumping in and out of it, maybe working 5 mins at a time so maybe that style of painting would work for you? I carry the canvas (usually 5x7), a brush (I have exactly 3), a tube or two of the colours I'll need for the bit I want to work on and a little babyfood jar of water in a sack. It goes with me so when I get to pick up my kid a bit early or am waiting at the train station. time inbetween runs at dog trials etc I have 2-3 minutes to whip it out and work, rinse the brush and toss it back in my bag. Acrylics is GREAT for brief snippets of workspace and there are people who have pushed it to produce results that are as impressive as anything you see in oils so don't let that put you off either!

Davkin
12-05-2010, 12:18 PM
Well, Wisywig I admire you for being able to do that with acrylics. I've played with acrylics a bit myself and still feel that I need to commit at least 2-3 hours to it in one session to make it worth the hassle.

I've decided to dump this particular subject, I just don't think a good compositon can come from it. This is why preliminary sketches are such a good idea. If I had just jumped into it without planning I would have wasted a lot of time. I am getting ready to start a winter landscape instead, some elements of which I can see right out the window of my "studio". It will be graphite. I will do a compositional sketch or two for your feedback as well.

David

Davkin
12-05-2010, 01:52 PM
Okay, here's my next attempt at starting a project;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Dec-2010/201970-sketchbook-05034.jpg

The focal point is supposed to be the trees in the foreground but I think maybe their center of mass is to close to the centerline of the composition so I think I might crop some of the bottom off and maybe some of the side as well. Also I think maybe the barn should be made a bit smaller more distant.

Here's the view from my back window that it's based on;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Dec-2010/201970-sketchbook-05034-ref.jpg

David

DrDebby
12-05-2010, 08:00 PM
Wonderful view.

As far as the composition, I agree the trees could be moved a little further off center. Not sure about the barn.

Davkin
12-06-2010, 08:41 PM
Okay, two more studies for this drawing;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Dec-2010/201970-sketchbook-05035.jpg

Another quickie thumbnail and I still think there's too much foreground.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Dec-2010/201970-sketchbook-05036.jpg

I did this one larger and more detailed. I think I like the amount of foreground now. The challenge will be creating a sense of distance in such a small amount of space.

David

DrDebby
12-06-2010, 08:59 PM
I do like the last one the best. Good eye.

Chuckcamo
12-08-2010, 02:06 AM
The last one looks great, I think your on the right path.... those little thumbnails are a great ideal too....

Davkin
12-08-2010, 08:36 PM
I created another landscape sketch for fun;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Dec-2010/201970-sketchbook-05037.jpg

I used charcoal for this one. I've been attended as much of the webinars as I can. It's amazing the amount of information this guy is giving us for free. Anyway, I'm just testing my understanding of some of the things he teaches. This sketch is very loosely based on a photo I took on a hike last summer, I don't know if this will ever get developed into a drawing or painting or not, it's just an exercise at this point.

David

robertsloan2
12-08-2010, 09:19 PM
David, this is great! Glad you're attending the webinars. They're so intense and wonderful, it's something that's obviously giving you as much of an itch to try everything as I've got. Love the melodic line of the hill behind the pines and the way you used the pencil to vary the foliage. You're getting it!

DrDebby
12-09-2010, 12:12 AM
This is a wonderful sketch. Good job.

seejay
12-12-2010, 12:05 AM
I feel your struggle with this stuff David. Don't talk yourself out of painting if you want to try it. Don't aim for a perfect finished picture to start, just have a go.

If you need any encouragement to get started, please read below.

Warning - Advertorial content follows!:D
-----------------------------------------
Indulge me while I recommend my favourite book about oil painting (and a lot of what it says would apply to other mediums). If you ever get bored, check it out. It is 'The Painter in Oil' by Daniel Burleigh Parkhurst, available as a free ebook from Project Gutenberg (http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/30877), maybe in PDF format on www.archive.org as well. I downloaded it, printed it out, and read bits out of it all the time. There are few pictures, lots of words - good bits about learning to paint; drawing, colour, perspective, light and shade, composition, and practical application about specific genres, landscapes etc. This is an old book, so some of the materials info is out of date (pigments etc), but the rest is worth a read. It may not all make sense first reading, but I keep getting bits out of it every time I go back to it.

Davkin
12-17-2010, 12:26 AM
Well, Mr Flake is at it again. :lol: I haven't really had time for sketching lately because I've been attending all the Johannes landscape painting lectures and even did a small practice painting today. Now I'm back to the idea of taking a serious shot at learning to landscape paint. I do want to keep sketching however so I've got to give up some of the time-wasters in my life so I can be more productive practicing and learning art. If this is what finally motivates me to give up TV watching and other lazy non-activities that alone will be worth it! :lol: Anyway, thanks for the comments and encouragement.

Seejay, I'll download that book, however I already have so many books, (most of which I have read) and with all this Johannes lecturing I think I just need to spend time actually doing it. You can only learn so much by reading about it!

David

JTMB
12-17-2010, 12:12 PM
I've been sitting in on Johannes' lectures as well - amazing amount of info, and probably a one-time opportunity so very worth the time investment I think. I'm with Chris - just dive in and do some paintings. Miles on the tires are a necesssary part of the learning process.

Davkin
12-17-2010, 01:17 PM
I've been sitting in on Johannes' lectures as well - amazing amount of info, and probably a one-time opportunity so very worth the time investment I think. I'm with Chris - just dive in and do some paintings. Miles on the tires are a necesssary part of the learning process.

This could be a one time opportunity, but only because Johannes get's spread too thin. Though he's willing to keep this up for as long as there's interest, I can already see signs of him trying to get the students to critique and help each other rather than putting it all on himself. There are nearly 100 people regularly in these lectures now and lots of posting in his thread and I'd imagine he's getting an awful lot of emails as well. He can only do so much himself.

I probably overthink things a lot, I just can't seem to help it. While painting is obviously fun, in order to reach the top level one has to work very hard, even with all the "secrets" Johannes imparting to us, knowledge alone can only take us so far. I can't help but "crunch the numbers" so to speak to count the amount of investment in time and money and do a sort of risk analysis. I don't aspire to be as successful as Aspevig, Wilcox or Christensen but I'd expect some kind of pay back eventually. Painting is far more expensive endeavour than drawing, I feel like I need to justify the expenditure. I don't see much point in doing it soley as a hobby and can't justify the expense, I might as well just stick with drawing. Also, one big "handicap" I that increases the challenge is I have an anti-social personality. I struggle in groups and I hate parties and I'm a terrible salesman. Being successful in art is as much about marketing yourself as it is about being good at making art. At 44 years old it's quite unlikely there's going to be any major shift in my personality in the future.

I know, I'm getting ahead of myself here, but you also need to plan your trip before you get on the road. I'll definately use up the paint I already have but once I run out I'll have to think hard wether I should spend the money for more.

Sorry for rambling so much here but this is stuff I think about a lot, (too much obviously) but please feel free to join me in a discussion about this, I can't imagine I'm the only person here that thinks about such things.

David

JTMB
12-17-2010, 03:31 PM
Hi David,

Well, this could turn into a long discussion, but here are a couple observations from my viewpoint. I'm a bit qualified to do this since I've played in bands (several very well known regional bands) in my spare time over the years, and have also published a number of photographs and related articles in national magazines. (I guess I gravitate toward interests that are tough ways to make a living - :lol: .) Music, art and photography are all areas that I wouldn't get into seriously if I felt there needed to be a payback...the probability of financial success, even with very good skills, is a long shot. In art and photography, the biggest indicator of this is virtually all the pros in these fields except those at the very, very top, give workshops as a major focus. I worked in the photography and commercial graphics industry for a few years and so knew a lot of commercial photographers and (mostly due to technology in that case) it is becoming so hard to make a good living on photography alone that many have either quit or focus on teaching other people how to become 'pros' or at least advanced amateurs. Here in Seattle, even Art Wolfe has started doing workshops - something he never did in years past.

The best art school in our region starts off every student in the admissions process by giving them a sober 'understand what you're getting into financially if you want to be an artist' discussion so they avoid setting expectations that field simply can't keep for talented and eager, but naive students.

In music, I remember feeling badly meeting pros that I admired who were envious of the quality of instruments I played that they couldn't afford because I was doing it on the side and could buy instruments with earnings from my main profession. My wife is very active in music promotion and just co-produced a big awards show in Nashville so is very familiar with that scene. There are phenomenal musicians, singers and songwriters in Nashville who are still waiting tables because it is such a competitive industry and frankly luck comes into it a lot as well - and connections, of course.

I've actually sold a few paintings, and have a solo show (obviously not a big venue - :) ) coming up in mid-summer and have met a lot of artists here in the area. A lot of them, like me, are retired and doing it as an avocation that pays some (usually not all) of their expenses for doing art and gives self-satisfaction, but not much beyond that. My view of art financially is it is really a lot like music - the vast majority of people struggle to make ends meet, and a few highly talented (and/or very lucky) folks that hit it big rake in great money, but it's not a likely outcome. My experience so far with getting honest feedback from people who are in a position to buy art is that except for true collectors who are very specific in whose art they will buy, most art is purchased because it matches home decor in the houses of people who have discretionary income. Obviously style of the art and quality of it comes into play as well, but often it's as much decorating as for the sake of the art.

All this having been said, I'm hoping like so many others on the forum here to get good enough that I can pay for a good chunk (or all) of my expenses of the passion that art looks to be for the rest of my life. But I manage my expectations very low based on the harsh realities I've seen in my exposure to other artistic endeavors over the years through personal experience.

As Johannes says, though, obsession with painting can cut years off the learning curve, and having started late, I'm hanging my hat on that since I'm definitely falling into the obsessive category. :o :lol:

Davkin
12-17-2010, 04:53 PM
John, unfortunately you've confirmed my suspicions. :lol: If this is just a hobby/pass time....well there are many other things I can do that take much less dedication both in terms of time and money and possibly give me as much satisfaction. I feel I have to look at it in terms of payback because I've caused myself much financial grief in the past by over-spending on hobbies, and I'm still working to catch up to where I should be financially at this time in my life. Diving into landscape painting as deep as Johannes would have us requires a significant financial commitment I beleive. There's nothing wrong with that as long as you don't neglect financial issues that are far more important. I think I'll have to remain a hobbiest/tinkerer on a limited budget for at least a year and then re-evaluate.

I'm still interested in other people's views on the subject.


David

Davkin
12-17-2010, 09:36 PM
My pencils were feeling lonely so I did this quick automotive sketch;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-Dec-2010/201970-sketchbook-05038.jpg

This is based on a photo in a book I bought recently called "Hot Rods in the Forties". It was taken at a dry lakes meet but there was no caption on this photo for more info. This books is basically just vintage photos with captions, perfect sketching fodder. :)

David

DrDebby
12-18-2010, 12:08 AM
Cool car. Amazing how pencils can feel lonely. :lol:

As far as your discussion on the payback for your investment... This is just my opinion. Art will probably not make you a living. You may make enough to pay for your supplies, maybe. The artists I know all either have a "day job" or they teach workshops or classes to make a living. Not that there is anything wrong with either of those options. If there is a passion there, the expense is just part of doing what you love. If there isn't a passion, then it's a part time hobby you play with now and again. Only you can decide what is the right path for you.

Davkin
12-18-2010, 12:41 AM
If there isn't a passion, then it's a part time hobby you play with now and again. Only you can decide what is the right path for you.

True Debby, but even passions/hobbies need to be tempered with reality. The oft repeated phrase "money can't buy happiness" is nice but the reality is poor people are less happy than the well-to-do according to recent studies. Money concerns can cause a lot of stress and therefore much unhappiness that would more than offset any pleasure that comes from pursuing passion or playing with hobbies. In my case the correct path is probably to just find a balance that allows me to indulge in my hobbies a reasonable amount while meeting my long term financial goals. The odds that art will ever help contribute to meeting my financial goals is extremely small, in fact it will most likely prove to be the opposite no matter how passionate I may become about it.

David

Davkin
12-19-2010, 12:26 AM
I did this one for the WDT. Far from accurate but it was a quickie just to get me back into the habit;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/18-Dec-2010/201970-sketchbook-05039.jpg

David

seejay
12-19-2010, 12:55 AM
The way I see it David, I could spend more money down the pub than I do on this 'hobby'!:D

Nice additions to your sketchbook too!:clap:

Davkin
12-30-2010, 07:15 PM
I did this one for the weekly drawing thread.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Dec-2010/201970-sketchbook-05041.jpg

I spent nearly 3 hours on this one, much longer than I spend on most sketches.

As for the painting, I think Ill be taking it slow. I plan on getting the paints out only once or twice a week. I still prefer to spend the majority of my art time with pencils and paper. That darned brush just feels totally alien in my hand, whereas the pencil feels like an extension to my own apendage, real easy to get into the "zone" with it.

David

DrDebby
12-30-2010, 08:24 PM
Cute little guy. Great detail on the leaves and such.

David, I'm so with you about a paint brush versus a pencil. I'd much rather have a pen or a pencil in my hand. I even tried a brush pen. Nope, didn't work.

JTMB
12-31-2010, 06:48 PM
Great job on the squirrel, David! Regardless of whether you get more involved with painting, the lectures from Johannes will be very valuable for your other media as well.

Happy New Year!

Davkin
01-01-2011, 12:18 PM
Debby, thanks for the comments. As for painting, I do still want to keep trying, for as long as I have paint left anyway. Once I run out of paint I'll have to make the tough decision as to wether to continue with it or not. It's definately much more difficult for me to get motivated to paint than to draw. I have made setup about as simple as it can be but it's still much easier to just pick up a pencil where I left off.

John, thanks for your comments as well. I definately agree that Johannes lectures were well worth the time wether I continue with painting or not. In fact I'm working on a landscape drawing right now and am keeping his notes in my head while doing it.

David

RainySea
01-01-2011, 07:25 PM
that is a wonderful drawing of the squirrel. . . great eyes and inquisitive expression. really nice one!

Davkin
01-01-2011, 07:41 PM
Thanks Rainy

Davkin
02-23-2011, 10:59 PM
You all probably thought I disappeared for good. Winter has been a bit rough on my attitude, but even so it's kinda hard to keep up with this forum and still do other things I want, but I'll try to pop in on occasion. I actually did another sketch in this sketchbook;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/23-Feb-2011/201970-sketchbook-05048.jpg

This is a study for a detailed pastel pencil drawing I think I want to do. I'd like opinions on the composition if you have any.

Thanks

David

CandAlArt
02-23-2011, 11:24 PM
Looks good David! You should do commissions for car collectors, for days they can't go out to the garage to pet their cars & trucks. Really!

DrDebby
02-24-2011, 10:18 PM
Wonderful old truck. Curious, what color is the truck going to be in your pastel pencil sketch?

Joan T
02-25-2011, 03:22 PM
Just catchin' up on what I missed. Glad to see you posting a few new ones...love the portrait, the squirrel, and the last car. It is hard to keep the sketchbooks going with life calling at the same time.

Davkin
02-25-2011, 10:00 PM
I took ten minutes and reworked the sketch. Corrected a couple lines on the truck and totally changed the background. The photo is not more correct to the ref photo I took;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/25-Feb-2011/201970-sketchbook-05048-mod.jpg

I think I like this version better.

Debby, The truck in the ref photo looks to be a faded red oxide with faded black fender, (paint mostly gone but only light surface rust.).

David

JTMB
02-25-2011, 10:18 PM
Great old truck, David! Reminds me of some I drove on my uncle's farm growing up.

CandAlArt
02-26-2011, 01:17 AM
Very good improvements to the background! Nice work.

Davkin
02-26-2011, 01:21 AM
Okay, next question; should I got for "the broken down, forgotten and abandoned" look or the "well used and worn but still functional" look?

David

RainySea
02-26-2011, 10:35 AM
I like the changes to the background, Dave . . . I think this second version puts the focus much more on the truck. The first one, the building with all its cool details, really grabbed my attention more.

Also Nice lines and proportions.

poochemio
02-26-2011, 01:33 PM
Cool sketch, I vote for the broken down abandoned look myself!

DrDebby
02-26-2011, 08:35 PM
The background is better on this second version.

The broken front windshield says "broken down, abandoned" to me.

CandAlArt
02-26-2011, 11:04 PM
Broken and abandoned, such a vignette with appeal! You could do another version all renewed like new life emerging from the barnyard. Good ideas here to go with.

Davkin
02-27-2011, 12:00 AM
Okay, looks like we are going for abandoned then. Thanks for all the input everybody!

David

poochemio
02-27-2011, 11:16 AM
Well have fun with it David, paint your heart out!

seejay
02-28-2011, 04:19 AM
Looking good David. I did think the original background was distracting, now the truck is obviously the star. Maybe you could do two drawings, one broken, one looking good.:D

Davkin
02-28-2011, 09:14 AM
That's a possibility Chris. I'm thinking now I'll do the drawing in graphite. The logistics of using pastel pencils is kinda complicated, plus I'm thinking of working on a drawing style that's a cross between hyper-detailed and sketchy. I don't think I want to spend 20+ hours on drawings any more, and while they may be technically impressive they don't have as much life as a drawing where the pencil marks are evident and much of the detail is suggested. I guess I'm still searching for my style. :)

David

Davkin
03-05-2011, 11:23 PM
Did a quickie for the WDT;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Mar-2011/201970-sketchbook-05049.jpg
The forms could definately use more definition, but again, it was just a quickie, I wanted to make sure I got something in for the WDT this week.

David

DrDebby
03-06-2011, 06:41 PM
Good to see you sketching again. Nice job.

RainySea
03-06-2011, 11:25 PM
looks like you captured the essence of the scene to me. . . nice work

poochemio
03-07-2011, 12:27 PM
ditto what Rainy said! I understand not wanting to spend 20 hours on a drawing David. Sketchy is fun, and you can put a lot more drawings under your belt. The more you do the sooner your personal style will evolve, or you will discover you had one all along! Have fun it's only a bit a graphite and a sheet of paper.

Joan T
03-07-2011, 12:55 PM
Nice second sketch with the different background. Good caputre of the essence of the last scene.

Davkin
03-20-2011, 12:22 AM
Thanks for the comments guys. Once again I disappear for a while, sorry about that. I meant to get some outdoor sketching in today but the weather didn't coorporate. I tend to be much more active with my sketching when the weather is good, hopefully it will warm up and clear up soon!

I do have a couple car sketches for you, actually, one car sketch done twice.

1st attempt;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/19-Mar-2011/201970-sketchbook-05050.jpg

The proportions are quite a ways off on this one. I noticed the problem probably half way into it but decided to finish anyway, practice is practice, right? :)

2nd attempt;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/19-Mar-2011/201970-sketchbook-05051.jpg

The proportions on this one are much, much better, not perfect but pretty good.

Now the story on the subject. This is a 1940 Ford, but it is a concept sketch. Ford never produced this body style in 1940. It's called a "Sportsman Convertible". Ford produced the Sportsman Convertible only in 1947, 48 and 49 but even the '49's were just left over 48's so it was essentially a two year production run with less than 3000 produced, (only 125 are known to exist today). The production numbers were so low because the Sportsman body added $500 (more than 50% more!) to the price tag over a regular convertible and it was essentially just a cosmetic upgrade with a wood body from the cowl back, (except for the rear fenders) instead of steel.

In my opinion the 47-49 Fords were not great looking cars so I wondered what the sportsman convertible idea might look like on one of Ford's better looking cars and so applied it to a '40 Ford in these sketches. I had an alterior motive to this sketch as well. My other hobby is model car building and I was considering building a model of this idea but decided to sketch it out first to see if I like it since it takes a lot longer to build a model than to sketch! I think I'll go forward with my plans to build the concept as a scale model.

David

poochemio
03-20-2011, 01:39 PM
Very cool concept sketch David. I've always been attracted to Woody's probally all the old movies I watched as a kid.

Davkin
03-20-2011, 07:36 PM
Another concept sketch, this time a hot rod;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/20-Mar-2011/201970-sketchbook-05052.jpg

This one didn't turn out so well and the scan gave me lots of trouble for some reason, it looks better in person. This was also for a model car project. I quickly threw together a mockup of the model with the parts I have an as they come out of the box and snapped a photo. The sketch is based on that photo but I changed some things to see how they would look. I chopped the top and channeled the cab, (lowered down over the frame) and shortened the bed. It's based on a '34 Ford pickup. It's easier and safer to sketch out the ideas on paper than to cut up the plastic kit parts!

I only have 14 pages left in this sketchbook!

David

DrDebby
03-20-2011, 09:26 PM
I love that you are going to make models of these. I think a picture of the finished product would be great to see on this thread. Cool sketches.

poochemio
03-21-2011, 08:08 PM
Does it please you as much as it does me to finish a sketchbook? I've actually skipped the last 10 pages or so in a couple and then felt guilty and went back and finished them up later!

I think it is very cool you sketch the modifications on your models until you are happy, less messups on the models and way good practice in your sketchbook.

Davkin
03-21-2011, 08:56 PM
I love that you are going to make models of these. I think a picture of the finished product would be great to see on this thread. Cool sketches.

An interesting idea Debbie but I think this sketchbook will be long done before the models are! :lol: If you think it takes many hours to make a good drawing you ought to take up model building. I figure the '40 Ford will take 60-100 hours. I'm keeping the hot rod simple, it should only take 40-50. :lol:

You might want to take a look at some of my older builds, I have photos of them in this Fotki album;

http://www.dsao.fotki.com/scale-models/

David

DrDebby
03-22-2011, 11:44 AM
I only built a few models when I was younger. I think the car was a Ford Model T. The rest of the models I built were dinosaurs. :) But, even not making from scratch and using a kit, yeah, it was a lot of work. Notice, I didn't continue. :lol: Your models look really great. Enjoy.

Davkin
03-22-2011, 07:28 PM
I only built a few models when I was younger. I think the car was a Ford Model T. The rest of the models I built were dinosaurs. :) But, even not making from scratch and using a kit, yeah, it was a lot of work. Notice, I didn't continue. :lol: Your models look really great. Enjoy.

I started building model cars when I was 6 or 7 and have been building off and on ever since, (mostly on). When I was a kid it didn't take long at all to build a model, just a few hours. When I was a senior in high school I discovered the hobby shop, model car magazines, clubs and contests and ever since my standards have been set far higher and it takes much longer to build a model, (and usually a lot more money!). I'm a member of a model car club that helps host the most prestigious model car competition/convention in the world, (thanks to the club president who is as nutty as you can get about this stuff!) coming up in just 1 1/2 months. I'll soon be very busy helping out with that. Plus the national model car builder's museum is here, (also a brain child of our crazy president) and our club helps maintain that. Besides all that I'm the club's newsletter editor. As you can see, this hobby keeps me pretty busy at times. What in the world made me think I could find time for art? :lol:

David

JTMB
03-22-2011, 07:56 PM
Nice job on the concept Ford and hot rod, David! And you definitely must have more patience than I do for those kinds of hours in models. I built some model airplanes as a kid, but they never reached the level of craftsmanship, I'm pretty sure. :lol:

Davkin
04-02-2011, 11:46 PM
I did this one for the WDT. This one wasn't a quick sketch, that's for sure!

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/02-Apr-2011/201970-sketchbook-05053.jpg

David

poochemio
04-02-2011, 11:57 PM
Amazing drawing David!

JTMB
04-03-2011, 01:31 PM
Nice job on the fish, David! This brought to mind a trip to Disneyworld years ago when we ate at a restaurant surrounded by a huge saltwater aquarium. Our table was right up against the aquarium plexiglas, and there was this massive grouper that stared at us the entire time we were there. Very strange feeling!

DrDebby
04-03-2011, 07:28 PM
Splendid fish.

Davkin
04-17-2011, 01:01 AM
Thanks guys. I managed to get a sketch in for these week's WDT. It's far from perfect but at least I got something done. Trying to work on getting back into the sketch habit.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-Apr-2011/201970-sketchbook-05054.jpg

David

DrDebby
04-17-2011, 05:42 PM
Good sketch. I'm sure with the nicer weather coming on, you'll be out hiking and sketching again.

Davkin
04-17-2011, 08:58 PM
Thanks Debby. It will be a while before I can do any real hiking. The mountains are seriously snow packed and it looks like it ain't done snowing up there! We are most likely going to have some heavy flooding this spring unless we have a real slow, gradual warm up, which almost never happens. The Jordan River is already running at least as high as I've ever seen. I suspect I won't be hitting even the lower trails until Mid-May at least, it will probably be a week or two into June before I get up to the higher trails and even then they'll likely have patches of snow on them. Our winter wasn't that bad, but we've had a brutal spring that just doesn't seem to want to let up.

I did another '40 Ford sketch, this time customized;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-Apr-2011/201970-sketchbook-05055.jpg

Here's the list of customizations; fender skirts, fadeaway fenders, carson top with a slight chop, desoto ribbed bumpers, custom grill and frenched headlights. If you don't understand any of that look back at the woody sportsman version and maybe you'll figure them out. :D

I'm getting pretty quick at these '40 Ford sketches, this is the third one I've done and it only took about 40 min. though the proportions aren't quite right.

I think this is how is more or less how my model of the car will end up.

David

DrDebby
04-19-2011, 03:31 PM
Cool car. Are you going to show us the model when you finish?

mhimeswc
04-19-2011, 03:40 PM
I want to see the model too. I did a few models (from kits) when I was a kid, only I did boats. Also got into making balsa wood planes when I was a Cub Scout leader.

I like your fish sketch because he really looks like he's under water, not just pasted on the surface.

Davkin
04-20-2011, 12:47 AM
Thanks for the comments guys. I'm now leaning back towards doing the sportsman convertible version of the '40 Ford. These sketches take a lot less time than building the models so it helps to try out different ideas on paper first. It will take me months to build the model so we'll see if I remember to post a photo here. Another issue is I don't know how much more I'll use this sketchbook, I'm finding I'm liking the paper less and less the more I use it. That seems to be a recurring problem for me with the sketchbooks, (If only they made a sketchbook with smooth Bristol paper in it!). #6 may end up being my only active sketchbook in the future since it's a handy little portable guy to take on short walks and to the park for quick, small sketches which the paper is perfectly adequate for, but when I start working 8x10 or bigger I want better paper.

David

CandAlArt
04-20-2011, 12:55 AM
(If only they made a sketchbook with smooth Bristol paper in it!).David

Yes they do. Go to Dick Blick and do a search on "smooth bristol sketchbook". Several spiral books are available, including Visual Journal & one by Bee paper. Good luck. Your stuff is great!

Davkin
04-20-2011, 12:57 AM
Thanks Candace, I'll look that up.

Okay, already looked it up. I think the Visual Journals are available locally but I don't know if they have the Bristol version. I'd have to cover up that ugly cover somehow though. :lol: I don't think I'd like the Bee Paper so much, it's lighter than the Strathmore, and I know it's not available locally. If at all possible I want to buy locally, don't really want to place an order just for a sketchbook or two.

David

Joan T
04-20-2011, 11:02 AM
Great sketches for the WDE, especially that fish!!!