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rusted_art
07-11-2010, 01:55 AM
MY IMAGE(S):
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Critiques/upload_spool/07-10-2010/204899_landscape.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Critiques/upload_spool/07-10-2010/204899_landscapedetail.jpg


GENERAL INFORMATION:
Title: scratching
Year Created:
Medium: Oil
Surface: Canvas
Dimension: 650mmx400mm aprox 2'x18
Allow digital alterations?: Yes!

MY COMMENTS:
i have been using dead branches to make random scratchings on my landscapes with i think a good effect so thought i would share the results. this landscape was painted in the last 30 mins to demonstrate and i did run it through auto levels in photoshop to emphasize the effect.

MY QUESTIONS FOR THE GROUP:
What other tricky effects could i use with this process? Any ideas will be very appreciated. thanks. vic.

Corby
07-11-2010, 11:38 AM
Do you keep fishtanks? I seem to see Angelfish and swordtails and so forth...I cannot give much positive feedback on this particular work as I cannot overcome my personal antipathy towards the technique of scratching into the paint. It seems to violate the beautiful fluid and buttery qualities of the oil paint. In other mediums it has a place...

La_
07-11-2010, 02:18 PM
anything will scratch a painting but i've found more success/enjoyment with using a brush to wipe back or remove paint as i end up with more control with the edges (i don't prefer the grooves left behind with scratching)

you've got some really nice contrasts going on in the bottom third of this piece, that's my favorite part of it all ... scratching is fine if you like the effect but i'd be careful with it, minimal use is best, imho = )

la

greensyster
07-11-2010, 08:17 PM
Those scratches are ruining an excellent piece! Throw down your sticks dear man; you have tried it now return to the brushes :)

bocote
07-12-2010, 10:50 AM
I'm okay with the scratching marks, but its "random". It seems a reason for this would show us something more. Other tricks would include composition planning, non mudding form transitions, a planned use of color, and a better description in the canvas space.

Lots of energy and clearly a good release. Perhaps try toning down the canvas to just an earthy color and work in your scratching with layers (between drying) with different patterns, etc and add some hues as needed later.

Have fun,

toraman
07-12-2010, 04:06 PM
I like the close up more and I like the scratches too. Maybe softening the scratches with a brush can make them even better.

rusted_art
07-14-2010, 08:22 AM
Thanks to all for your feedback and ideas. This is my 100th post so congratulations and happy birthday to me....

Harry Seymour
07-14-2010, 09:32 AM
The colors are beautiful and scratchwork interesting. Have you considered scratchboard art. Check out the forum.

cathaden
07-14-2010, 10:25 AM
ah....now the scratches make sense to me. very cool; would love to see it in rl! I bet it's beautiful!

tgsloth
07-14-2010, 01:34 PM
I join the pro-scratch faction and also salute the overall fine painting you've achieved in such a short session. Hues and values are all, pretty well nailed.

What else could you use. About anything, I guess. Turner famously used his fingers and fingernails as he attached the canvas (don't clean your hands by licking after that). I've had some luck with paper stumps, torn up T shirts wrapped around a finger, and computer cleaning swabs which can be ordered on line. Said swabs have a smooth foam side and scratchy side.

Corby
07-14-2010, 11:20 PM
very nice RA! I find 'Q tips' useful...

dlyose
07-14-2010, 11:52 PM
Hi, I don't know how to do this. Ha ha! this is my first post.

I like your scratching. I scratch in watercolors. I also use sandpaper! Yeppers! sounds crazy! But I have really got some cool results.:wave:

crazywoman53
07-15-2010, 11:25 AM
Interesting work. The last on in particular has an almost abstract fantasy feel to it.I like it. I suppose you could scratch with just about anything that is harder than the paint.. the possibilities are endless.