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View Full Version : All-In-One Easel for Pastels


Potoma
06-21-2010, 06:07 PM
Over the weekend, I saw a demo and he had a pastel box I had not seen. It's an All-In-One (http://www.all-in-oneeasel.com/PastelsEasels.html) made in Maine. Great for plein air, it has room for pastels and supplies/paper. Anybody see or use one before?

Donna T
06-21-2010, 06:30 PM
Isn't this the easel that Kim Lordier uses? If so she might be able to help.

Potoma
06-21-2010, 06:43 PM
I'm just curious b/c I'd not seen it before and I thought I'd shopped everything to death already.

Lynndidj
06-21-2010, 09:05 PM
Never saw this one before, but I don't like painting on the lid of a box - been there and done that, and my arm and shoulder would ache from having them in an awkward position to paint the bottom of my paper. I now use a Heilman box with one of their aluminum easels - none of my pastels get broken because of the memory foam lining the box and tops, and I can get my work up away from my pastel box. Love those straps for the tripod, but mine is heavy and would be too much weight for one arm/shoulder. The heavier tripod makes my setup more stable even when the wind blows. Just my take on what works for me when doing plein air.

Lynn

Potoma
06-21-2010, 10:50 PM
I agree about the lid thing. Heck, I generally paint on my lap.

Studio-1-F
06-22-2010, 09:38 AM
I agree about the lid thing. Heck, I generally paint on my lap.
Then you'd be "wasting" half the potential pastel space if you went with this All-In-One, since one side is the lid, where you are supposed to store paper. (It also looks like the lid/paper angle doesn't extend back beyond 90 degrees. It doesn't bend backwards, to accommodate that angle of paper. In case someone wants to use that angle.)

Jan

Potoma
06-22-2010, 12:03 PM
The demo I saw was Daniel Wise and I took a picture of his pastels. I think he has the larger version and I can't fathom needing more pastel space than that! However, I'm not sure I'd use the other storage side very efficiently. Further, the pastel part is very deep, not good for those of us with short arms reaching over.

Unfortunately, this picture file got locked and I can't manipulate the images, so no sharing just yet. I did the blog upload first, so at least know that'll be ready in a few days.

westcoast_Mike
06-22-2010, 01:38 PM
Yeah, this is the one Kim uses. Here is another thread (http://wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=542637) on it

chewie
06-23-2010, 01:13 PM
that looks really good. i still use my full french, but when it dies, that looks like the next one i'd get.

klord
06-24-2010, 11:02 PM
Hey All,

I love this box! I think that is what I wrote in the last thread on this topic:)

Inside the lid I keep my finished work while on location, and loads of extra paper so that I do not have to carry a separate folio. If one has a shorter arm length, I recommend the 11x14 size. It carries a great amount of pastels, and is comfortable to use. The 16x20, even tho' I am on the shorter side, 5'4", works great for me, because it keeps me from getting too close to the working surface and makes me use my whole arm to make strokes.

486933

The beauty of this design is that you need nothing more to carry than a tripod. Or this can sit on a table top or in your lap, as I have done both on many occasions.

Just thought I would add my two cents, if you all don't mind:)

chewie
06-25-2010, 01:17 AM
for another 2cents, can you show it from the side to see the paper storage area? boy, this looks so good. i am using a full french that i do like but it gets heavy. how's this do in heavy winds?

klord
06-25-2010, 03:29 AM
How about a direct link to the All in One web site, and I'll do it for free! ;-))

http://www.all-in-oneeasel.com/

klord
06-25-2010, 03:33 AM
Oops, forgot to answer the second question, Chris.

The only time I have had it go over is when I did not have it attached to the quick release plate correctly. Of course, that was while I was getting set up to provide a demo for a workshop that I was teaching! Ha! No wind was involved in this incident.....

It is quite sturdy in high winds.

vascharf
07-12-2011, 06:07 PM
Looking at the Sienna pochade box as a plein air setup. Would like some input from those who might have used it. Looks like the EASyl Versa, only a little less expensive.

Davkin
07-12-2011, 06:46 PM
I have the Sienna pochade and it doesn't really hold very many pastels. If I remember correctly the pastel palette that goes with it only holds 100 or so half sticks. I ended up using a small Dakota Traveler as my palette and set that on top of the pochade, kind of a waste if you're only looking to use it for pastels. If you also paint in oils then it's a good option, just keep in mind you'll probably want a larger pastel palette on top of the pochade.

David

vascharf
07-12-2011, 07:43 PM
Received the Dakota tripod easel to use with the Dakota Small Traveler Box I already own. Big disappointment. A nightmare to set up, and very unstable. Needless to say, I will be returning it. Anyone have any ideas for a reliable plein air setup that I can use with the box I already own? The pochade boxes I researched seem to sacrifice space for pastels in favor of the all-in-one convenience.

robertsloan2
07-12-2011, 08:09 PM
That pochade and tripod is an interesting setup. So is the Sierra pochade and tripod setup.

I was tempted - but I already have an Anderson Swivel Easel with famous pastelist mojo that I bought used from Deborah Secor. I've got it packed for watersoluble oils because I've got my pastels in a Dakota Traveller, but Deborah thoughtfully provided an empty 18 color Unisons box to pack a lightweight field set of chosen pieces into. That fits neatly in the sketchbox with plenty of space to spare.

I also won a Joe Miller Signature Field Easel in a sweepstakes. It arrived yesterday. It's beautiful, sturdy, easy to set up and much better for watercolor or possibly Pan Pastels in a small tray than pastels in the very shallow, small sketchbox area. Its big advantages are four legged stability and three palette shelves that fold or pull out. So I could set that one up with a slotted foam tray of semi-hard pastels on one shelf, medium pastels on another and hand-rolled or super soft set on the third. If I use it with pastels, the pastels boxes will get rubber banded together and stashed with it in my Art Comber.

I will get my chance to try a pochade-and-tripod setup after I move to San Francisco. I bought a cool DIY pochade kit that I think is about 9" x 12" and my daughter gave me a hand-me-down lightweight tripod. I just need to get settled in, get going on other stuff and then get a drill plus jars of wood stain and polyurethane finish to assemble it.

Finally, before I got any of those I got a three pound aluminum tripod easel that's very basic, with an umbrella on a pole that weighs about the same. That and stuffing the empty Unisons box with selected pieces of pastels would be my lightest, most portable setup. I may bring it out to my street artist setup along with whatever easel I'm using to set it up as a field easel. For just rambling around in the park or on the streets painting whatever grabs my attention, it's loony easy to set up and does adjust to seated height so I could use it with a power chair.

Vascharf - I was tempted by that easel too when I bought my Dakota Traveller. Thank you for letting me know I was right to decide I have too many easels already! I think combining the three pound field easel with a cheap little folding stool to hold the Dakota Traveller next to me rather than between me and the art might be a lot more convenient.

That might be a solution for you. Not a folding stool if you want to paint standing, but a tall lightweight folding table to hold the Dakota Traveller. Ez-Up makes these 2 foot square folding tables that are lightweight, sturdy and adjust to be rather tall - good height for when even a tall person is standing at an easel. I saw them online but haven't actually seen one in use.

Davkin
07-12-2011, 11:58 PM
Received the Dakota tripod easel to use with the Dakota Small Traveler Box I already own. Big disappointment. A nightmare to set up, and very unstable. Needless to say, I will be returning it. Anyone have any ideas for a reliable plein air setup that I can use with the box I already own? The pochade boxes I researched seem to sacrifice space for pastels in favor of the all-in-one convenience.

Maybe make a shelf that can mount to a tripod to set the dakota box on to your side while you sit and a traditional easel in front to hold your painting? I suppose with the right tripod you could even elevate it enough that you could stand with the Dakota box to your side, it would have to be a sturdy tripod though, and having the box to the side isn't nearly as convenient.

David

westcoast_Mike
07-13-2011, 10:48 AM
Anyone have any ideas for a reliable plein air setup that I can use with the box I already own?

Quite a few Artist simply set their box on the open drawer of a french easel. Some also bungee cord it to it so security.

helenh
07-14-2011, 09:05 AM
Sun-Eden makes a nice setup. I use it with my Heilman box, but it would work just as well with the Dakota box. Here is the link: http://sun-eden.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=category.display&category_ID=4
I use the tripod, the shelf and the traveling adapter. I don't use the side mount accessory boxes. I attach the shelf to the side of the tripod so that I don't have to reach over it to paint. I use a bungee cord to hold the box on the shelf in case of wind gusts (or clumsiness). This is Maggie Price's setup. Works for me.