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View Full Version : tweeking a painting to match a frame


Potoma
05-24-2010, 11:04 AM
Have you ever done it? Or steered a painting a bit toward a frame you want to use?

I have quite a collection of frames to use and, if I have a burgundy one that suits, I might put a bit of burgundy in the painting to make sure they flow together.

Or the like.

I have a painting I framed last fall in an off black. It doesn't suit the show I'm going to put it in, so I'll reframe it in a glorious gold-ish one, so I will slant the fall colors and reflections toward the gold.

Artistic license?

Paula Ford
05-24-2010, 12:04 PM
Sure, I've tried. Most of the time it doesn't quite work out though :lol:

allydoodle
05-24-2010, 12:23 PM
Sure, I've tried. Most of the time it doesn't quite work out though :lol:

It seems that the same thing happens to me! The minute I try to force something, things go awry! That doesn't seem to stop me from continuing to give it a go, though :lol:. I think maybe it is easier to paint to a size, as opposed to painting to a color, although I've had my share of troubles with that too :eek: !

Potoma
05-24-2010, 01:21 PM
Aw, shuddup! Ima gonna figure this out.

Lynndidj
05-24-2010, 02:18 PM
I think that would be extremely difficult - but you can give it a go!! The problem is, are you being true to the painting and what it could be if you freely painted what was best for the scene/portrait/still life, when you are also trying to match a frame? I don't think I could do it.

Now, painting for a size of frame, so you could use standard sizes, would be much more doable, IMHO.

Good luck!!

Lynn

westcoast_Mike
05-24-2010, 02:41 PM
It would probably be easier to paint the frame to match the painting. :evil:

sketchZ1ol
05-24-2010, 02:51 PM
hello.
the idea/notion makes sense to me.
i've come across good frames at a good price and had them in the back of my mind as i come across images that inspire.
neon purple might take a bit more time to match, but lately i've been watching ' Blade Runner - the Final Cut ' dvd from the library, so...
( btw, there's a disc 2 with a ton of info about the artistic process in that movie; sketches to blueprints to the set/film - one of the last to be made without cgi effects ).
:} Ed
ps. i've found wood frames properly stained w. cherry or burnt sienna and sealed or waxed (for depth/wet look) work very well w. purple/burgundy and deep/gold ochre, but to be honest, i haven't tried the reverse.
nor wax dispersion over pastel... hmmm.
i digress. e

Paula Ford
05-24-2010, 05:08 PM
It would probably be easier to paint the frame to match the painting. :evil:

:lol: Been there, done that too :lol:

Deborah Secor
05-24-2010, 07:26 PM
I agree with Mike. I might 'slant' the painting toward burgundy, for instance, and be prepared to use some elbow grease on the frame. My m.o. is to take a slightly shop-worn but sturdy frame and use a green scrubbie pad (Scotch Brite pad) or fine sandpaper to remove a bit of the finish. Then I'll paint a color with some really runny acrylic paint and let that dry overnight. I may do two or three light, runny coats to get a color I like. Then I'll go back in and sand it back lightly. Sometimes that does it, as in the painting below. Sometimes I will use a dry-brush technique to paint long, straight striations with gold or walnut or whatever the color of the frame is. I find it tints nicely and gives a nice brushy look to the gold or walnut. Sometimes I use a toothbrush to spatter gold or walnut back over the striated finish and lightly sand it again.

I spent time examining the way they achieved molding finishes. It isn't hard, but it is time consuming and frankly I'd rather pop a few more bucks for a nice new frame most of the time! I'll reuse glass, if it isn't old and scratched up. Glass does deteriorate, so really old stuff isn't worth it.

One thing, my work can take an informal look. My frames are all the same square shaped molding, too, so there's consistency in the 'look' on a gallery wall, even if the color and textures vary a little, which helps.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/24-May-2010/23609-Kinship_Circle_framed---.jpg
This is one of my redone frame specialties...but the pic is bad, so you can't really tell.

Anyway, there are some thoughts for you!

Deborah

Potoma
05-24-2010, 09:28 PM
Messing with the frame is above and beyond! I've had people offer me frames, but I figure I don't need a new hobby. I've done plenty of refinishing in the past, so I know what it takes, even the jiffy version. Hats off to you.

Now to try to re-save this painting!

Colorix
05-25-2010, 09:15 AM
... My frames are all the same square shaped molding, too, so there's consistency in the 'look' on a gallery wall, even if the color and textures vary a little, which helps.

Deborah

Yes! The frames don't have to be identical, as long as they are 'sameish' in some way. Either the same molding with differing colours, or, the other way around, for example all golds/driftwood/bamboo/whatever but not identical in size or shape.

I've painted a painting to match a frame, in colour. "This dark wooden frame with a gold edge and the egg-blue mat would need an ochre-earthred-skyblue painting . Worked great. Never tweaked a finished painting to match a frame, though.

Charlie

Deborah Secor
05-25-2010, 02:01 PM
I hear ya, Bonnie! Unless I'm in the mood to do something crafty, it's usually more trouble than it's worth. But sometimes it works out.

Deborah