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Davkin
05-23-2010, 11:12 PM
Yes, I am starting another sketchbook, this makes four I'm working on at once, but each has it's own purpose. This one is the "Anything Goes" sketchbook. Any subject, any media, from life or from photos. The idea is to get me to try different things, I'll probably be doing a lot of sketches from forum challenge thread in this book. The sketchbook is 8.5" X 11" and is a hardbound journal type called "Master's Touch" by Fine Art Studio. It has the rough, heavy off-white paper found in most journals of this type.

While the idea is to get me to try new things I started this book by working on graphite, but the subject is new for me;


http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/23-May-2010/201970-sketchbook-04001.jpg

This is from this week's D&S challenge. I meant for this to be just a one hour sketch, but the subject is deceptively complex and I was enjoying it very much, so I spent about three hours on it.

David

DrDebby
05-23-2010, 11:54 PM
Nice perspective on the violin, David. You have a deft touch with graphite.

eyepaint
05-24-2010, 02:14 AM
Cool! Might you have been inspired by Robert's Goof-off Book? :)

kkramer2
05-24-2010, 02:39 AM
Very nice. The only thing that I see that I myself had to get some advice on was the use of softer lead to add some more depth to the piece. I am not sure how dark the values are in the photo as it is just that but I would guess the darkest values were created with a 2b or maybe even 4b lead.

If you use just two more higher like 6b or 9b or ebony you will see a huge difference in the depth.(ebony does tend to be a bit shiny though)

I have a few sketchbooks going my self but I find myself experimenting with the different paper types.

All around very good. It is particularly difficult to draw such structured subjects and the perspective is awesome.

JTMB
05-24-2010, 03:12 AM
Very accurate drawing, Dave! Musical instruments are hard - especially acoustic instruments - because there are so many curves to deal with. Few nice straight lines or right angles as with structures. Having played fiddle for a few years, I could tell right away that you nailed the instrument.

Davkin
05-24-2010, 10:14 AM
Might you have been inspired by Robert's Goof-off Book?

Possible. Even though I plan on doing many WC challenges in mine it really won't look much like Robert's I only plan on doing one sketch per sheet. I purposely picked this larger size so I could sketch larger, though the violin didn't use the whole sheet, that sketch actually only measures 5.5 X 8. Also, I'll have sketches in this book from other photos and probably a few life sketches as well.

The only thing that I see that I myself had to get some advice on was the use of softer lead to add some more depth to the piece

It's actually quite a bit darker in person and I'm not sure the paper would have take much more graphite. The background is many layers of 4b. Like Robert has mentioned, graphite can be difficult to scan accurately, probably due to is shine.

Thanks for all the comments guys.

David

Davkin
05-26-2010, 10:13 PM
That's right, I'm updating 3 of my sketchbooks today! I don't turn on my computer every day, so you're getting updates on everything I've done since Sunday.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/26-May-2010/201970-sketchbook-04002.jpg

You'll probably recognize this one from the Pen & Ink forum May challenge since Robert has already done it. This was my first attempt at colored pen and it didn't go anything like I planned. I was hoping for a smoother look, but the only way to do that would have been with pointillsim and I just wasn't feeling that patient that day. It did turn out kinda Van Gogh-ish. If I had started with that idea in mind I might have had something.

David

DrDebby
05-26-2010, 10:49 PM
David, nice teacup. It has it's own style.

robertsloan2
05-28-2010, 09:25 PM
Wow! Your graphite violin is spectacular. Wonderful realism. The teacup did come out well. I used pointillism and you took another texture, but I think yours worked well too.

Davkin
05-28-2010, 10:00 PM
Thanks Robert. I've discovered however this book won't work well for all media. In fact, it didn't even work that well for the violin. The paper is quite light yet very rough which means it takes lots of effort and/or layers to fill all the valleys, not exactly a good combination. The label advertised it as all dry media + light watercolor but at only 70lbs I should have known better. I think this book will be relegated to light to moderate sketching, mostly with dry media and some pen work as well. I was unable to find a large format sketchbook with paper similar to paper in my hand.book brand sketchbooks, (which I think is ideal) but I've got another idea to use for an "Anything Goes" sketchbook, though I probably won't have time to implement it until next week. Anyway, the format of my work for this thread is going to change somewhat in the future.

David

robertsloan2
05-29-2010, 04:25 PM
I've thought of getting some hot press paper, chopping it to 8 1/2" x 11" and putting it in a ring binder for a true All Media book. I might do that once I fill my All Media Book, because HP allows that kind of refined pencil work and it doesn't hurt it that the pages are 140lb rather than 90lb at all.

90lb watercolor paper only comes in cold press though. Hot press is great for fine detail and for shading smoothly and filling all the valleys. Some cold press papers are like Rough when it comes to valleys. I haven't tried a HandBook brand sketchbook though, so I might when I'm farther along with the Moleskines that I have in progress and start looking at the next generation.

Davkin
05-31-2010, 11:29 PM
I think I can officially call this the " 9x12 Light to Moderate Sketching" sketchbook now. :) I don't plan on doing more than using dry media, and possible, very, very light subtle watercolor washes, but we'll see about that later. For now I have this just completed sketch to offer, took a little over 3 hours;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-May-2010/201970-sketchbook-04003.jpg

This is from last week's "Weekly Drawing Thread" in the D&S forum.

David

robertsloan2
06-01-2010, 12:14 AM
Nice truck! I love the proportions, depth, perspective and sheer volume in it. This is great! Way beyond what I can do. I'd better start improving on vehicles and buildings though, in four years I should at least be able to do loose vehicles that look real but less defined and good attractive buildings in a recognizable way. Or at least ornaments on them.

DrDebby
06-02-2010, 06:39 PM
That's an awesome truck. You draw vehicles so well. (I know, practice. :wink2:)

WC Lee
06-03-2010, 12:59 AM
good start on your anything goes sketchbook :) and the beautifully rendered musical instrument is a great way to start it off

Davkin
06-03-2010, 01:10 AM
Robert: Take up the daily 15 minute sketch routine, you'll see your vehicles and buildings progress quite rapidly.

Debby: For most of us mere mortals the only way to get good at anything is practice, right? :D

Lee: Thank you very much for your comment.

Davkin
06-03-2010, 01:14 AM
Even though I don't care much floral I'm trying to participate in the "Drawing and Sketching" forum's weekly challenge every week and this week is floral. To make sure I get something into this week's challenge I decided to start off with just a quick 1/2 hour sketch;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/02-Jun-2010/201970-sketchbook-04004.jpg

I added some colored pencil highlights though intentionally in a more subdued colors than what the ref. photo shows. In that sense this was an experiment, I've never added CP to a sketch or drawing before. I'll try and get a full detail graphite in this week as well for the D&S challenge.

David

DrDebby
06-03-2010, 11:26 AM
You got the pansies just fine. Careful with that colored pencil, it's addictive. :wink2::lol:

robertsloan2
06-03-2010, 01:59 PM
I like the pansies, David. Great accuracy on the leaves and blossoms, I did some pansies in detail a while back and remember finding the leaves and stems a bit tricky, you got them spot on. The color's great. Colored pencils are fun and yes, they get addictive. Especially the soft, high pigment load artist grade ones.

You're probably right about the daily fifteen minute sketch. I've got four years to get used to them and their proportions, by then they'll probably be as decent as my trees, cats and faces. I might try a lot of shorter sketches of buildings and vehicles too in order to get a feel for general proportions and make them more familiar.

Davkin
06-04-2010, 01:20 AM
Debby: Actually I've played with CP before and it's really anything but addictive for me, more frustrating really. It takes way too much effort to cover the paper with color for my tastes, in fact it usually just makes my elbow sore. :lol: I think I'll only be using CP for adding color highlights to graphite and ink drawings as I've done here or possibly in conjunction with watercolor paintings. I actually like the Graphitints better for that but the color range is extremely limited. You CP painters are an awfully patient lot! :lol:

Robert: If it's mainly proportions of cars and buildings you need to practice you can probably go with just 5 minute or even 3 minute sketches. It's probably a good idea to practice two or more cars in one sketch as well to practice keeping their proportions correct relative to each other. You don't want A Yaris to be the same size as a Suburban in a painting. Well, unless the Suburban is farther back in the scene anyway. :)

David

robertsloan2
06-04-2010, 01:32 AM
Thanks, David. It's mostly that, not details of how to do glass in headlights. The last time I put a car in a watercolor painting it was one of those small Japanese ones and it came out so narrow it wouldn't have had a passenger seat. I flinched at that.

Ever since I stopped actually driving, I haven't paid much attention to cars or their brands or how they look. I moved to San Francisco where it wasn't practical to have a car, let my license lapse and then never got around to getting one again because most of the time I lived in cities with mass transit. Now that I'm moving back to San Francisco of course, it's still not something I'll be looking at for myself, more as a landscape element.

If I can get them to look like actual cars I'll be content, not too worried about trying to get them so exactly that people can spot the make and model and year. I could probably do one well if I used a photo reference and measured it carefully, it's more trying to sketch from life that they come out off.

Trees and organic things are a lot more flexible! I can move a branch or make it wider to make the picture better, even a vase or the size of a teacup in a still life has some flexibility -- but cars have got to actually look solid and be a reasonable size somewhere between the small ones and the larger ones. Buildings need to be solid and not have doors or windows out of proportion, though there's a bit of flexibility there.

I spent too many years losing myself in details and measuring by details on drawing. If I sketch simple and loose, correct to get the proportions, details take care of themselves and aren't even always necessary to include in a final drawing. But oh boy, the car had better be car sized and not a toy or something competing with an 18-wheeler.

Davkin
06-09-2010, 01:38 AM
I decided I need to refine my sketching style, my sketches have been too scribbley for my taste, so I'm going to do a series of sketches in this book that will focus on improving my sketching style but will still be sketches. One of my favorite automotive artists is Ed Tillrock, http://www.edtillrock.com/automotiveart.html I especially like his sketching style, though you won't see his sketches on his website, I've only seen his sketches on an automotive art forum. Anyway, this sketch is an attempt to emulate his style while making it my own;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Jun-2010/201970-sketchbook-04005.jpg

I spent about 40-50 minutes on this, half that time just trying to get the perspective of the headlight right, I think i layed it out and erased it ten times :lol: It was important though since it's the focal point. The reference is a photo I took at a local cruise night;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Jun-2010/201970-sketchbook-04005-ref.jpg

Overall it is an improvement, but still needs a little refinement and to go darker.

David

Nancys
06-09-2010, 03:51 AM
The violin is awesome and the amount of time on it is evident.

mhimeswc
06-09-2010, 09:53 AM
The violin is wonderful, David. The perspective on that vintage car headlight would have been a nightmare for me, but it looks like you nailed it. I find cars very difficult to sketch.

robertsloan2
06-09-2010, 03:01 PM
David, the vintage car headlight sketch is excellent. I can see how going darker on the darks would help bring the lights into focus, though the lights still have modeling shadows on them too. Curving reflective surfaces are so tricky!

It can also help to use Gimp on the scan - open the image, save as and experiment with the Color menu. I found a "Levels" function that if I move the slide to the right, it darkens everything and can bring back some lost light values that went to white when scanning overexposes what's scanned.

DrDebby
06-09-2010, 04:08 PM
That's a great sketch of the headlight. I want to comment on your photo skills as well, since you took the reference. Nice composition.

Davkin
06-10-2010, 12:48 AM
Robert, Nancy, Michelle, and Debby thanks for the compliments. However, if you see problems with my sketches don't hesitate to give me some critique, my ego isn't fragile, in fact it's non-existant. :)

Robert: I did adjust the image, it matches the real sketch pretty well. It's me that needs to go darker, not the scanner. :lol:

Debby: Thanks for the comment on my photo. Don't be suprised to see a lot more car sketches in a similar style. I go to a lot of car shows and I take lots of photos, I probably have thousands.

David

robertsloan2
06-10-2010, 01:14 PM
Ahh yeah, you could tell. It would look good if you went darker on the darks.

Davkin
06-11-2010, 02:10 AM
Did this for the D&S weekly challenge. Not one of my strong subjects but I took a shot at it anyway.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/10-Jun-2010/201970-sketchbook-04006.jpg

David

DrDebby
06-11-2010, 01:05 PM
Yay for going outside your comfort zone and drawing a person. The eyes are a little off, but it's a good likeness.

Davkin
06-12-2010, 12:55 PM
I did this for the D&S weekly challenge. I was going to go into more detail with it but posted it up as a WIP in D&S and after the feedback I received I realize there are some major proportion issues. I won't bother spending any more time on it. It would take less time to start over from scratch rather than fix this one, and I honestly don't care enough to do either. :lol:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/12-Jun-2010/201970-sketchbook-04007.jpg

David

robertsloan2
06-12-2010, 08:12 PM
Despite proportion issues, your dog looks pretty good. Some of it may just be a matter of different dog breeds too, some have longer muzzles than others. I like your shading and careful textures, the corner of the mouth is great. The portrait of the girl is great, you got a good expression for her.

mhimeswc
06-12-2010, 09:01 PM
Nice looking dog!

DrDebby
06-13-2010, 01:35 AM
It's a good dog sketch. And the eye is very well done.

Davkin
06-13-2010, 09:46 PM
Thanks guys.

Back to Basics- I decided it would be a good idea to do some exercises out of "how to draw" books. I have enough of them, I ought to use them. :lol: I did these two exercises out of the "How to Draw What You See" book by Rudy de Reyna.

First up is a value you study, red apple vs green apple;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Jun-2010/201970-sketchbook-04008.jpg

I didn't get the highlight on the red apple light enough.

This exercise is a still life meant to put everything together from the previous chapters of the book.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Jun-2010/201970-sketchbook-04009.jpg

The perpsective of some of the oval shapes is off a bit.

I'm going to try and do at least a couple book exercises a week. Practicing from challenges, from life and from photos is fun and does help, (any practice does!) but I feel like I need to spend more time on building a foundation for my drawing skills.

David

jacquip
06-13-2010, 09:56 PM
Dave I really like the dog. These exercise are great. Ovals are so hard for me too. Wonderful reflection and shading on the coffee pot. The folds in the cloth are awesome too. I always think it is good to go back to the books and practice some of those things that you don't always think about in your drawing. You are an inspiration, thanks for sharing.

DrDebby
06-14-2010, 01:45 AM
Nicely done exercises. Ovals aren't easy. I think I do more erasing when I'm trying to draw one, than just about anything else except people.

robertsloan2
06-14-2010, 04:31 AM
David, great exercises. The one thing I see off on the still life is the bottom curve of the coffee pot. The teacup and saucer and vase look fine. Well done!

I've been doing that too occasionally and it's a good idea. It helps a lot. Thanks for posting these. They're so well done too.

mhimeswc
06-14-2010, 07:56 AM
Good job on the still life. I think I remember doing the same still life while working on the Drawing 101 class over in the drawing forum. The elipse on the teapot lid is a little off, but I think you nailed the rest of them. Nice job on the folds in the cloth too.

Davkin
06-15-2010, 12:45 AM
Thanks for the comments guys.

Jaquip: Inspiration? Why, because I make others feel much better about their own art? :lol:

Robert: Actually I think both the top and bottom of the coffee pot are off, as well as the cup.

David

Davkin
06-15-2010, 12:48 AM
I did this for the Landscape forum challenge.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Jun-2010/201970-sketchbook-04010.jpg

I find foliage tough to do convincingly in graphite so I took this one on. I actually zoomed in and cropped the ref. photo then blew it up, which in some ways made it more difficult since I was basically working from a lo-res photo. It turned out okay, but obviously still a lot of room for improvement.

David

robertsloan2
06-15-2010, 01:16 AM
Gorgeous. Sometimes a low-resolution photo can help because it simplifies things, eliminates excessive detail. Your foliage masses look good in this.

DrDebby
06-15-2010, 04:57 PM
I look at your landscape and see a beautiful country scene in graphite. You will get even better at trees I'm sure.

Jakesgram
06-30-2010, 03:02 PM
DK - I LOVE you're "light to medium sketches Anything Goes" book! :lol:

That violin, to start with, is fantastic. It's so beautifully done, I can see the light bouncing off of it and can almost hear the sweet music pouring out of it. Another favorite is the dog. You say the proportions are off, but to the untrained eye (mine) it looks wonderful! I also really like the landscape and I think you did a great job with the definition of the foliage. That's one of my more difficult areas too, both with dry and wet media. I like seeing so much variety in your sketchbook.

Nice work!

Jean

virgo68
06-30-2010, 08:31 PM
David, this sketchbook is following it's title! I think you are a doing a fabulous job, by trying out many subjects, textures, themes etc your drawing will keep improving and you'll find what sorts of things you are naturally good at or inspired by. Practise makes perfect.....?! :)

Davkin
07-01-2010, 02:19 AM
Wow, all of sudden interest in this sketchbook even though I've neglected it for two weeks. I am working on another entry however. I just started a charcoal exercise from the de Reyna book. I'll also be taking it with my on a hike in the High Uintas tomorrow, so hopefully I'll have at least a couple new entries soon.

Robert: Yes, a low res photo can be similar to squinting to make out values from a live scene, however some times you need to know what's there to understand what the values mean! :lol: I recently bought a book called "Drawing Landscapes In Pencil" by Ferdinand Petrie. Most of the drawings in this book are done in open air and that's what he teaches. His drawings of a painterly style to them, not exactly my favorite but they are effective and I think it's worth my time to learn his style if for nothing else than to improve my sketching. I haven't done any of the exercises yet but I plan on taking the book with me on my hike tomorrow to see if it helps me.

Debbie: Thanks, I'm sure I'll get better too....if I can bring myself to practice more consistently! :lol: Even though I have been a bit busier than normal lately I really have no excuse, it's just pure laziness.

Jean: Stop it, you're making me blush. :o :D

Jackie: (I'm a Virgo too, '66 vintage. :D ) yes practice does make perfect, (or at least more perfect.) but you gotta practice! Thanks for the comments.

David

Davkin
07-02-2010, 01:42 AM
Today I was on vacation and went on a hike in an area called the High Uintas wilderness area. This is an alpine-like forest about 1 1/2 hours East of Salt Lake City. The trailhead I started at is called the Crystal Lake trailhead which is at about 9,800 ft altitude. Being an alpine like setting you see lots of ponds like these along the way;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/01-Jul-2010/201970-uintashike-01.jpg

The first major landmark on the trail I took is Wall Lake about 1.1 miles of hiking but just a climb of about 100 ft vertical, in this photo you can see how it got it's name;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/01-Jul-2010/201970-uintashike-02.jpg

That's Mount Watson in the background.

Another 3/4 mile or so of hiking I spied a deer at another pond, it was a doe and as I moved closer to get this photo she spied me back;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/01-Jul-2010/201970-uintashike-03.jpg

At this point the trail became very steep through a series of switchbacks. My final destination was Hope Lake and from this pond as the crow flies it was probably only an 1/8 mile or so away, but the steep switchbacks probabably added another 1/2 mile to get to the lake. Up to this point I'd been handling the hike much better than I expected, it's been nearly a year since I've hiked at this high altitude and I've only hiked a couple times so far this year. However on the switchbacks I had to stop to catch my breath several times! Here is Lake Hope, not much of a lake is it. :lol:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/01-Jul-2010/201970-uintashike-04.jpg

There was a reward however for all that climbing, this awesome view;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/01-Jul-2010/201970-uintashike-05.jpg

Yep, that pond in the foreground is where I spied that doe! You can see Wall Lake in the middle ground there. This trail actually ascends another several hundred feet to it's summit at a place called "The Notch" because it's a gap in the Notch Mountain range. The view from there is truely spectacular, you can make out 8 lakes from that vantage point. I wasn't feeling up to that much of a hike today though. I spent some time sketching at Lake Hope and at the pond below then hiked back down. For some reason the stretch from the trail head to Wall Lake always seems longer going back than coming up. As the saying goes, "My dogs were barkin'. " So I stopped off at a place just off the highway a few miles down from the trailhead called the "Provo River Falls" to soak my feet in the freezing cold run-off water. Talk about hurting so good! Here's a pic of part of the falls;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/01-Jul-2010/201970-uintashike-06.jpg

David

Davkin
07-02-2010, 01:48 AM
Oh, I guess I should so some sketchbook content. :D On the other side of Hope Lake I found a small scene I decided to sketch. I first did a value study in my #3 sketchbook, though not sure why since I was doing the sketch in pencil anyway. :lol:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/01-Jul-2010/201970-sketchbook-03023.jpg

For this sketch I tried a new style I've been studying in a book by Ferdinand Petrie. I haven't done any of the exercises in the book yet so I don't really know what I'm doing but I gave it a try anyway;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/01-Jul-2010/201970-sketchbook-04011.jpg

The sketch was cut short by a thunderstorm, (not exactly uncommon in the High Uintas in the afternoon) but I got most of it down. Not really liking it but sketching is practice right?

Here's a photo of the actual scene;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/01-Jul-2010/201970-sketchbook-04011ref.jpg

As you can see I simplified it some by removing some of the trees.

David

DrDebby
07-02-2010, 12:56 PM
Thanks for taking us along on your hike. The sketches are just fine. You are really getting the foliage of trees with your sketches.

Davkin
07-14-2010, 01:11 AM
Were you guys beginning to wonder what happened to me? :D I haven't done anything art related since the little Model A Ford pen and WC sketch over a week ago. I'm rather busy getting ready to move. I won't actually be moving until a week from Thursday but I've got furniture shopping to do and lots of packing and organizing so I won't be doing much art until after I'm moved and settled in, except maybe on Sunday, I'll take a break from moving concerns then. The good news is that where I'm moving to will have much more to offer in the way of sketching subjects within easy walking distance, in fact I can see a small barn out my dining area window! Not a very interesting barn but it's something. :D The interesting thing is the move is only 3 1/2 miles, but there is quite a contrast in the surroundings.

Anyway, I took a break from moving activities and did do some sketching today. The president of the local art club held a "paint-out" near his studio. Unfortunately very few people showed up, in fact only four of us not counting the president, and only two of us were current members! I just took sketchbooks #4 and #2. The spot was very nice, a little oasis in the middle of the city, it would have been super nice if not for all the traffic noise in the background. The spot is on Little Cottonwood Creek, the creek that flooded Murray Park a month or so ago, but this spot was about a mile or so east of Murray Park. The spot was pretty small but there was plenty of interesting subjects to draw, (I'll probably return on my own) I started with this neat little scene in a bend in the creek that had a very short "waterfall".

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Jul-2010/201970-sketchbook-04012.jpg

Unfortunately I didn't think to take my camera. I used 3mm lead holders with HB, 2B and 4B leads. The sketch came out okay, but I obviously need more practice doing these larger scenes. I also did an awful watercolor sketch of this scene in sketchbook #2, go take a look if you dare but don't say I didn't warn you. :lol:

After a medichocre pencil sketch of a scene and a disastrous watercolor sketch I decided I needed a win, so I did what I seem to do best;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Jul-2010/201970-sketchbook-04013.jpg

Yep, another rock and bark study. :D I just used my tried and true .05 HB mechanical pencil. I didn't know how much time I'd have so I just started at the big rock and worked around it. I only used about 1/3 of the paper. I actually enjoyed doing this exercise, so maybe sketchbook #4 will see more location work in the future.

David

Vivien Maloney
07-14-2010, 09:22 AM
Somehow I've seemed to have missed posting in this Sketchbook/Journal. Sorry about that but I enjoy what you've done very much. I also like the idea of doing the "Challenges" in the various Forums as it certainly adds interest to our art. I haven't been in the D & S Forum for a while but will have a look in there again as you've stimulated my interest in that Forum. I'll follow this Journal with interest and can't wait to see more.

DrDebby
07-14-2010, 02:52 PM
The creek scene with the waterfall looks like a lovely place to sketch. The great thing is you keep pushing and trying new things. I don't like a lot of my sketches either. But, I try to learn from them.

You are getting really good at rocks and trees.

Davkin
07-26-2010, 10:16 AM
Hery guys. The move is finally done and I'm back....at work anyway. I won't have internet at home until tomorrow. I made it back to that spot and finished the sketch yesterday;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/26-Jul-2010/201970-sketchbook-04013-a.jpg

David

DrDebby
07-26-2010, 07:47 PM
Oooh, niiice... very nice. Good job.

robertsloan2
07-26-2010, 09:59 PM
David, these sketches are great. I love the photos you got in the High Uintas too, such great views. Thanks for showing a photo of the scene for the one you got rained out on, it helps a lot to see what you're drawing from. That last study of bark and rocks is so gorgeous.

mhimeswc
07-26-2010, 11:45 PM
What great scenery you encountered on your vacation! You did some terrific sketches too. I love Ferdinand Petrie's pencil work. I've taken his book out of the library so many times that it should be mine by now.

christinemlr
07-27-2010, 06:39 PM
My first time looking at this thread David, and I haven't seen all from the beginning yet, but started with the hike photos they are amazing, what country! You're brave to tackle such awesome scenery.
The latest sketch of the rock and bark is beautiful. I love the delicate grace of the leaves contrasting with the texture of the bark, and the way you've left the rock alone which emphasises its inert shape set against the life of the tree surrounding it. Lovely
Xina

Davkin
07-27-2010, 07:10 PM
Thanks for the comments everybody. I am quite happy with this last sketch, and to think it was all done with a single .5 mechanical pencil with HB lead. I'm finding more and more that's pretty much the only tool I need.

David

virgo68
07-27-2010, 11:24 PM
David, what beautiful scenery photographs - I am so jealous that you have so much inspiration to call on lol!

Congrats on the move and still being able to sketch, you are getting a nice collection of drawings coming together ;)

Davkin
07-28-2010, 02:19 AM
Thanks Jackie. Utah is a great place to live for the landscape artist. We have everything here from red rock desert canyons to mountain alpine lakes. I may take a trip down south in late August and if I do I'll probably do some hiking and sketching at Cedar Breaks National Monument, probably my favorite scenic spot in Utah.

David

TaniaBee
07-28-2010, 07:21 AM
Great sketches & Beautiful photos - i feel like i went on the hike with you!!

Davkin
07-31-2010, 05:20 PM
Thanks Tania.

Just so everybody knows, this sketchbook won't be used for pencil anymore. If I feel the urge to draw in charcoal or pastel I'll use this book but I suspect that won't happen often. I'm starting a new sketchbook the same size and spiral bound that will be pencil only. I never like the paper in this book for pencil and I've found that being hardbound is a liability in this larger size when working outdoors.

David

robertsloan2
07-31-2010, 05:41 PM
David, that makes sense. The big size would be perfect for charcoal or pastels though. Maybe if you used charcoal pencils and pastel pencils with it, that'd be easier?

I know using the right paper helps a lot with various dry mediums. I've got a variety of sketchbooks and finding out what works best on which paper is always an adventure.

robertsloan2
08-28-2010, 07:22 PM
Hery guys. The move is finally done and I'm back....at work anyway. I won't have internet at home until tomorrow. I made it back to that spot and finished the sketch yesterday;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/26-Jul-2010/201970-sketchbook-04013-a.jpg

David

This is spectacular. Took me a bit to find it, but it's still gorgeous. If you added more darks, please post the newest version!

Davkin
09-01-2010, 01:17 AM
Thanks Robert.

This one if for the August Landscape Challenge. Got it done at the last minute as usual. It's charcoal, my first real attempt with charcoal I think;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-Aug-2010/201970-sketchbook-04014.jpg

The reference wasn't the best subject for a monochromatic study, not a wide range of values in it, though I could have lightened up the rocks for contrast. In person the rocks read a bit lighter than the scan shows. I spent about two hours on this one.

David

virgo68
09-01-2010, 05:00 AM
David your landscapes are improving all the time! Charcoal is a very dramatic medium but also can be used lightly making it so very versatile, I like this - it suits your style of drawing very much ;)

rmcbuckeye
09-01-2010, 10:39 AM
Beautiful scenery photographs of Utah - I've had the privilege to visit Salt Lake City and its surroundings - Went hiking up to Mount Timpanogos, explored in a cave, that was awesome! I have a lot of pictures from my trip there. :)

robertsloan2
09-01-2010, 05:12 PM
Beautiful charcoal drawing. I'm glad you slipped it in at the end of the month, haven't seen this month's landscape references yet but I really like that scene. Your close crop of it is beautiful. Frustrating when a scan messes up something like that.

DrDebby
09-01-2010, 11:10 PM
Very nice landscape. The charcoal seems to work really well for you.

Davkin
09-19-2010, 03:15 PM
I did this for this week's D&S challenge, the theme is self portraits;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/19-Sep-2010/201970-sketchbook-04015.jpg

Scare ya? :lol: There's a reason I did it this way. I've been told many times that I'm rather scary to people that don't know me. I'll admit I'm not the happy-go-lucky outgoing type and especially in the morning I can seem rather grumpy at times and tend to mumble but I've never understood why people were downright frightened of me. So I decided to make my self portrait making a face that I think must be how people that don't know me well tend to percieve me. Of course I didn't stand in front of a mirror holding that face while I drew, I took a photo and worked from that. It's far from an exact likeness but it certainly makes my point. :D I did this one in charcoal as well. Seems like it takes either ink or charcoal for me to get good darks. :lol:

David

Davkin
09-19-2010, 03:16 PM
David your landscapes are improving all the time! Charcoal is a very dramatic medium but also can be used lightly making it so very versatile, I like this - it suits your style of drawing very much ;)

I agree Jackie, I'm having fun playing with Charcoal. I actually have an 18X24 sketchpad and some vine charcoal as well, I'm sure I'll start that one up this winter.

David

Davkin
09-19-2010, 03:20 PM
Beautiful scenery photographs of Utah - I've had the privilege to visit Salt Lake City and its surroundings - Went hiking up to Mount Timpanogos, explored in a cave, that was awesome! I have a lot of pictures from my trip there. :)

Thanks Rachel. Glad to here from someone that's actually been here. I'm embarrassed to say though I've never been to the Timpanogas caves. My problem is I don't like crowds and even on a weekday the hike to Timpanogas cave can get crowded. The trail to Timpanogas caves starts in American Fork canyon, my favorite canyon to visit during the fall. Unfortunately it's a very narrow canyon and very popular, you really have to visit on a week day to avoid the crowds but I'm swamped at work, I doubt I'll be able to take a day off this fall.

David

Davkin
09-19-2010, 03:21 PM
Beautiful charcoal drawing. I'm glad you slipped it in at the end of the month, haven't seen this month's landscape references yet but I really like that scene. Your close crop of it is beautiful. Frustrating when a scan messes up something like that.

Thanks Robert. Charcoal has opened up new possiblities for me I haven't thought of before, I hope to do a lot more with it.

David

CandAlArt
09-19-2010, 04:52 PM
David your self portrait is wonderful! I am in a portrait group each Wednesday and some of them won't even let my hubby- a photog'- take their picture, much less attempt a self portrait. The humor in yours is great. Try doing yourself as an animal- very fun exercise I did in college. Did myself as a cat. You could be a bear! Growling!

DrDebby
09-19-2010, 07:26 PM
Great sense of humor in that self portrait. And you don't look scary to me. I agree with Candace, a bear.

JTMB
09-19-2010, 09:47 PM
Hi David, I haven't checked in on this book for a while. Nice work here! The dog is my favorite, but I like your choices of subjects in general, and your results are very good.

Davkin
09-20-2010, 01:23 AM
David your self portrait is wonderful! I am in a portrait group each Wednesday and some of them won't even let my hubby- a photog'- take their picture, much less attempt a self portrait. The humor in yours is great. Try doing yourself as an animal- very fun exercise I did in college. Did myself as a cat. You could be a bear! Growling!

I'm afraid I don't have the imagination to draw myself as an animal, I have no idea how that would work. I'm rather camera shy myself. You won't see the ref photo posted here, in fact right after the sketch was done I threw the printout in the trash and deleted the digital file. :lol:

David

Davkin
09-20-2010, 01:24 AM
Great sense of humor in that self portrait. And you don't look scary to me. I agree with Candace, a bear.

Thanks Debby.

Hi David, I haven't checked in on this book for a while. Nice work here! The dog is my favorite, but I like your choices of subjects in general, and your results are very good.

Thanks John.

David

robertsloan2
09-20-2010, 05:06 AM
Ink and charcoal do give the best darks, they always have for me too. Also the very soft graphite pencils, 6B and softer do, but even there they have a bit of a shine to them that ink and charcoal don't. Some pencils are hybrid, like Wolff's carbon pencils or Design Ebony Pencils, which is why I really like them for their deep darks - they handle a bit more like graphite but still have the charcoal darkness to them.

Great self portrait. Definitely not a morning person! Very cool. Love that expression, someone doing a self portrait that's not flattering, that's awesome.

Davkin
09-20-2010, 08:52 PM
Ink and charcoal do give the best darks, they always have for me too. Also the very soft graphite pencils, 6B and softer do, but even there they have a bit of a shine to them that ink and charcoal don't. Some pencils are hybrid, like Wolff's carbon pencils or Design Ebony Pencils, which is why I really like them for their deep darks - they handle a bit more like graphite but still have the charcoal darkness to them.

Great self portrait. Definitely not a morning person! Very cool. Love that expression, someone doing a self portrait that's not flattering, that's awesome.

Thanks Robert. I'm not sure it's possible to make a portrait of me that would be flattering. :lol: I've used a General Carbon Sketch pencil before, is that similar to the pencils you're talking about? Can't say I really cared for it.

David

virgo68
09-20-2010, 09:33 PM
hehehehehe! The self portrait is fun! Are we going to see some more people drawings from you David? It looks like you are pretty good with a lot of subjects :)

Davkin
09-20-2010, 09:46 PM
Thanks Jackie. I'm not sure how many people sketches you'll see from me, we'll see. My favorite subjects are landscape and cars so that's what I tend to focus on. However I'm entertaining the idea of doing a whole sketchbook that's just copies of Gil Elvgren pin up girl paintings. I love nostalgia too. :D I'm of the opinion that subject is pretty much irrelevant when it comes to artistic ablility. Yes, some subjects present special challenges related to technique but when you boil it all down it's all just line, shape and value regardless of subject.

David

Beautiful_Butterflies_Studio
09-28-2010, 12:50 AM
FANTASTIC WORK, all of these drawings are FANTASTIC. Each has it's own charm and characteristics... BUT overall I see a huge improvement and I hope to see more!!!!!

robertsloan2
09-28-2010, 04:48 AM
I think the General's carbon pencils are similar to the Wolff's ones although I haven't tried them. They're cool. I like them for sketching.

What I do when I want a flattering self portrait is set up strong side lighting with a desk lamp, then turn toward a 3/4 face view so that I've got depth and cool shadows making my features look craggy and dramatic. That'd probably work for you too. Think of how many actor photos have that pose. Good lighting can do a lot, so can doing it on a good day when you're feeling confident.

Davkin
09-28-2010, 08:24 PM
Thanks for the tips Robert, thanks for the comments Stacey. I'm not sure I'll use this book again. Since I've started using spiral bound sketchbooks hardbound books don't feel nearly as comfortable. That means I'll probably be abandoning sketchbook #2 as well.

David