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piper
03-25-2001, 08:24 AM
I just read the discussion on prepping hardboard/plywood. At the end Cassandra said she would just plan to work on sheet metal instead. How can I find out more about painting on sheet metal? Thanks

cuttlefish
03-26-2001, 01:14 AM
I don't know where you can find more information, but I have some suggestions. I've seen acrylic painted on metal before, usually airbrush application on brushed aluminum and copper sheets; brass would probably work too.

Three things to keep in mind:
1. The metal must be thoroughly cleaned of grease and oil. As a waterborne medium, acrylic will be repelled by any oily residue.
2. Abrade or etch the surface of the metal to create tooth. Polished metal will be unable to make a mechanical bond with the paint, and make it succeptible to peeling.
3. Do not paint on iron or steel with acrylic. The water in the paint will make it rust, weakening the bond and discoloring the paint.

VictoriaS
03-26-2001, 10:44 AM
Would you have to gesso the metal to be painted, or just abrade it? Cuttlefish, do you know?

Depending on the kind of art you do, rust might not be a terrible problem. Kind of a living, changing work of art, maybe. Last time I went to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, there was a watercolor (I don't remember what it was a painting of), that had been buried in dirt several times for extended periods -- until it reached just the right stage of decomposition. Sounds strange, but it was actually kind of beautiful. Art takes many forms!

Victoria

piper
03-26-2001, 11:40 AM
I had read somewhere that you can only paint oils on copper? Does anyone know if that is true? It was apparently quite common as a "canvas" surface way back when. I am researching different surfaces on which to paint large abstract pieces on. I have used masonite and canvas. Looking for alternatives.

cuttlefish
03-28-2001, 12:09 AM
Victoria wrote:
Would you have to gesso the metal to be painted, or just abrade it? Cuttlefish, do you know?<snip>

So long as the metal won't corrode with water or react to a particular pigment you're using, gesso shouldn't be necessary. Since acrylic gesso is just titanium white acrylic paint with calcium carbonate from chalk or pulverized marble added, the same rules apply to is as regular acrylic on nonporous, nonreactive surfaces. I haven't heard about problems with using acrylic on copper, but you may want to use an isolating varnish of some kind if you're concerned. I'm not sure what you could use, though, since solvent-based varnish tends to be oily itself and repellant to aqueous media.

As for deliberate rusting, if you like that sort of thing, great. Just be aware that the rust will bubble beneath the paint, eventually causing it to peel, and will also cause discoloration (but you meant to do that)

VictoriaS
03-29-2001, 06:06 PM
Originally posted by cuttlefish:
As for deliberate rusting, if you like that sort of thing, great. Just be aware that the rust will bubble beneath the paint, eventually causing it to peel, and will also cause discoloration (but you meant to do that)

See: http://www.artcommotion.com/Issue2/moca/Yoko/

Hey, Cuttlefish, if Yoko Ono can put perfume on flies and release them from a jar and that's called "art" -- not only by Yoko herself, but also by at least two art museums -- then I guess a little rusting and bubbling and peeling isn't going to hurt anybody's art career.

Victoria

cuttlefish
04-02-2001, 05:57 PM
Just addressing archival issues, that's all.

artbyking
04-03-2001, 09:44 AM
If by SHEET METAL you mean "galvanized" sheet metal, there is a primer for that surface which in very sticky and allows a good bond for paint. It is not the ordinary primer for metals since the galvanizing of the metal makes it rust reistant but very difficult to hold paint. Galvanzed sheet metal is the kind you see in harware stores for heating ducts on forced air furnaces. (It's shiny) My father was a heating man in Northern Minnesota, so I come from a very experieced background in furnaces. I do not know the name of the primer but if you go to a good harware store and tell them you want primer for galvanized metal they will have it. It's not extremely rare. Alas, if I had know this as a boy, before I painted my go cart, the red flames would have stayed on for more than a month. (my dad was not one to offer instruction BEFORE I made mistakes).
Hope this helps. Tim

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VictoriaS
04-04-2001, 11:03 AM
Originally posted by cuttlefish:
Just addressing archival issues, that's all.

Cuttlefish: I have to learn to start saying "LOL" and putting smily-faces in my messages when I don't mean to be taken seriously. Shouldn't assume people can tell by what I say.
Victoria

tammy
04-28-2001, 12:57 AM
I don't know much about this either but I just did a metal pail that was rusted pretty good. What I did was first I sanded it down and then washed it off. (I've since read that after sanded it would be good idea to rinse with water and vinegar) I then primed it with a commercial primer for rusted metal and then painted over it with acrylic. I don't know how long it will last but it came out pretty good.

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donjusko
05-01-2001, 06:32 PM
I paint a fair amount on aluminium foil on PH neutral board. First I coat it with water based polyurethane and paint with transparent oils. A light sanding would help acrylics.
Actually you could paint on any metal that was sealed on 6 sides.

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