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VictoriaS
01-31-2001, 01:34 PM
Is spray varnish something I can buy? (I looked, but didn't see it at the art supply store.) Or would I have to get some sort of sprayer to fill with varnish? An airbrush or something like that?

Thanks, and sorry about my ignorance.
Victoria

LDianeJohnson
02-01-2001, 10:47 AM
Hi Victoria,

If you are varnishing an acrylic painting, you can either spray or brush on the varnish. Two thin coats of brush on varnish (first in one direction, then the other) with a foam brush works nicely.

For spraying, position the painting upright instead of flat to avoid those little droplets from landing on your painting. One brand to try is Grumbacher Hyplar Gloss Varnish Spray (highly glossy if you like a shiny finish), or Grumbacher Hyplar Varnish Spray (for both oil and acrylic). I recommend testing first on something before applying to final work. For best results use a few light applications to achieve your finish instead of one heavy coat.

Diane

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2001 L. Diane Johnson Plein Air Workshops (http://www.LDianeJohnson.com/workshops)

LDianeJohnson
02-01-2001, 01:53 PM
I finally located my favorite of the sprays. I had placed it in a cabinet and couldn't find it on my last post..."Blair Matte Spray Varnish for Acrylic Paintings" It is not glossy and gives a nice finish.

I normally use the brush-on formulations rather than spray.

Happy varnishing http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif

VictoriaS
02-02-2001, 12:37 AM
Thank you, Diane. I'll look for that Grumbacher varnish. Foam brush is a good idea, too; I got some brushmarks when I applied varnish with a regular brush, and that's why I was asking about the spray.

Thanks,
Victoria

Keith Russell
03-12-2001, 12:22 AM
Greetings:

Well, I switched to acid-free illustration board due to this forum, let's see if I need to correct anything else.

My work is mostly done with airbrush, and is 100 percent acrylic. The airbrush applies paint in very thin layers, and I have had varnish actually lift paint right off the surface of illustration board, when applied with brush.

I have used Krylon Krystal Kleer forever, and have never had any problems. (But, I am not certain of the long-term effects, if any, with this product.)

Is this a good product to use to seal my finished paintings? Is there something better? Is there anything wrong with using Krylon?

My stuff is starting to sell for semi-serious bucks, and I would really like to use the best materials available, price no object.

Thanks,

Keith.



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Keith Russell
Synthetic Sky Studios
Science Fiction Fine Art
[email protected]
artkc.com/russelk.htm

VictoriaS
03-13-2001, 10:45 AM
Keith: I saw a guy on TV varnishing his acrylic painting with an airbrush, and it looked great -- went on so perfectly even. Since you airbrush, is there any reason you don't also varnish with it? That's sure what I would do.

Woodciro: Good question. The only two books I have on acrylics say you should varnish, and I think the reason is something like acrylics dry with microscopic pores that collect dust and moisture, and varnish protects from that. I hope Artistry comes along with an answer to this.

eyeburp
03-13-2001, 01:35 PM
Keith:
I also spray Crytal Clear onto my airbrush paintings (thin, transparent layers of acrylic). My oldest piece is about 10 years old and shows no signs of yellowing or cracking...yet. I posted a question here, at WC, when I first joined regarding long-term qualities of the product. Nobody had any advice then and I haven't been able to find any other info. Fingers crossed.

Victoria:
Would you happen to remember the product that the guy on TV was using for airbrushing varnish? Cleaning my airbrush after running varnish through it would seem like quite a chore!

VictoriaS
03-13-2001, 02:48 PM
Eyeburp, I don't know what it was. However, I think I still have it on tape, so I'll check within the next day or so to see if he mentioned what he was using. I do remember that he diluted it with a lot of water (I think he said 50%).

[This message has been edited by VictoriaS (edited March 13, 2001).]

Keith Russell
03-14-2001, 10:35 AM
Greetings:

Yeah, the main reasons I have not been airbrushing varnish over the top of my finished paintings, is the fact that Krystal Kleer is available, and I didn't know which varnish to use, nor what to use to clean it out of the airbrush.

As for Krystal Kleer, I have paintings that are almost 20 years old which were treated with Krystal Kleer, and I've had no problems with yellowing or cracking, either.

But, as I am more and more interested in making my work as archival as possible, I'd love to know about my other options.

Keith.

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Keith Russell
Synthetic Sky Studios
Science Fiction Fine Art
[email protected]
artkc.com/russelk.htm

Keith Russell
03-15-2001, 09:34 PM
Victoria:

I'm not familiar with that varnish, to know how thick it is, straight from the bottle, but most likely, but yeah, that's probably the reason for the dilution.

Basically, any liquid that can be thinned at least to the consistency of milk, can be sprayed through an airbrush.

While we're on the subject, did he recommend a certain number of coats, or mention a drying time (overall or between coats)?

Thanks a bunch,

Keith.



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Keith Russell
Synthetic Sky Studios
Science Fiction Fine Art
[email protected]
artkc.com/russelk.htm

VictoriaS
03-16-2001, 12:12 AM
Originally posted by eyeburp:
Would you happen to remember the product that the guy on TV was using for airbrushing varnish? Cleaning my airbrush after running varnish through it would seem like quite a chore!

Okay, I checked the tape. He was using Golden Polymer Varnish with UVLS. He said he mixes 70% gloss and 30% matte, and then dilutes "up to 50%" with water. Would the dilution keep the airbrush from clogging?

Keith Russell
03-16-2001, 10:12 PM
Victoria:

thanks for the info. One to two weeks is quite a long time for drying; I usually spray my work with Krylon the night before I take it to my photographer.

And, my house is so dusty that the one time I used Damar was the last.

Testors (the plastic model company) used to make an almost all-plastic airbrush that you could buy for about $35.00. It was a single-action (which I never recommend for anything other than flat colour work), but it would do the trick for varnish experiments.

Yes, you do have to have an air-source.

The cheapest (and of, course, the worst) kind is 'canned air', which is literally an aerosol-type can of compressed air. Most hobby stores which sell the Testors airbrush will have some of these things, too. For about twelve bucks you get a can of air that will give you an air pressure of about six pounds per square inch (psi).

I work around 40 to 45 psi; t-shirt or automotive painters work much higher (85 to 100). Yes, at 6 psi, the brush will clog often, but that's not the worst of it.

The cans of air tend to freeze up after about ten minutes of spraying. Putting them in a bucket of tepid water helps--unless it's a small bucket, in which case the water will freeze along with the can.

Then, you have to stop spraying until the can thaws.

A small compressor (1/16 hp) which will provide 10 - 12 psi runs $65.00, a slightly larger one (1/12 hp) will run at 20 psi, and cost $125 - $250.00. (More powerful, but noisier, compressors can be found at most hardware stores, or pawn shops, for not a lot more than $250.00. My last compressor was a Craftsman, from Sears, and has a full hp, and an 8 gallone tank. It would provide up to 125 psi continuous.)

(Now, I rent a cylinder of industrial nitrogen, which looks a lot like the tank with which they fill balloons at carnivals. It provides about a month's worth of perfectly dry, breathable air. It comes pressurized to 2,500 psi.--which would blow holes through just about anything. An industrial regulator--not cheap--stops that down to my working pressure of 40. I also have a manifold on the regulator so I could run up to 10 airbrushes simultaneously.)

Hope this helps...

Keith.

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Keith Russell
Synthetic Sky Studios
Science Fiction Fine Art
[email protected]
artkc.com/russelk.htm

VictoriaS
03-17-2001, 12:09 AM
Originally posted by Keith Russell:
While we're on the subject, did he recommend a certain number of coats, or mention a drying time (overall or between coats)?




He didn't mention, but they showed him spraying it. Once back and forth across the canvas, and then he turned the canvas 90 degrees and did it again. I have a bottle of the stuff, and it says on there that it should be allowed to dry for one to two weeks before handling, although it is touch-dry within a few hours.

And, Keith, I have a question or two for you: do you know whether there are any cheap-but-adequate airbrushes around? I'm kind of tempted to get one just for varnishing (and to play with), but I don't want to spend a whole lot on one since that's all it would be for. And when you buy an airbrush, don't you also have to buy separately some sort of air supply device? If so, where would you get that?

Thanks,
Victoria

[This message has been edited by VictoriaS (edited March 16, 2001).]

[This message has been edited by VictoriaS (edited March 16, 2001).]

Keith Russell
03-20-2001, 12:07 AM
Victoria:

A good basic double-action airbrush is the Badger 150.

You can get one for about $85.00.

Keith.

------------------
Keith Russell
Synthetic Sky Studios
Science Fiction Fine Art
[email protected]
artkc.com/russelk.htm

VictoriaS
03-20-2001, 12:09 AM
Thanks, Keith, for that information. It does help. I guess I'll wait until I have more use for an airbrush and then get the good stuff. I appreciate your help.

Victoria

eyeburp
03-20-2001, 08:24 AM
Victoria:
Also try eBay for airbrush deals.

Keith:
Where do you rent the cylinder and how much do they charge? I'm looking for a new compressor and maybe your method is better than the $700 silent compressor.

cuttlefish
03-21-2001, 05:57 PM
>>>Testors (the plastic model company) used to make an almost all-plastic airbrush that you could buy for about $35.00. It was a single-action (which I never recommend for anything other than flat colour work), but it would do the trick for varnish experiments.<

That airbrush was actually manufactured by Aztek, a company that started in the mid 80s making plastic airbrushes. I haven't found their website yet, but the single-action model is still available for approx. $30 from misterart.com and dickblick.com. They have more sophisticated models as well, all for less than comprable models from other manufacturers. One interesting feature about them all is that the nozzle, aircap, and needle are sold as a preassembled cartrige. I haven't tried one, but the only bad thing I've heard is that the hose that comes with them is thin and flimsy feeling.

leesmith
03-23-2001, 09:28 AM
Regard the Krylon, I used it OUTDOORS on decorative mailboxes, and it held up in all kinds of weather, gloss. I always use the matte Krylon crystal clear acrylic spray to final coat my canvas paintings. Then if a client tells me they prefer a gloss finish, I can easily do a light coat of gloss acrylic. I never use varnish IF my subject matter has white or very light colors because any pristine white areas will yellow using varnish that is the advantage of using acrylic spray. If colors are vivid with no white, I don't worry about any yellowing and will use varnish when it's on hand.

Lee