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View Full Version : HELP! What kind of paper?


leesmith
03-20-2001, 11:45 PM
What kind of paper would be suitable for using acrylics? I paint opaquely and have always used stretched canvas. Will paper support painting opaquely or will the paper wrinkle? I have a client with frames, glass and matting. Would it be best to use canvas board and have client omit the mat and glass? Thanks for your help!
Lee

eyeburp
03-21-2001, 08:04 AM
Recently, as a cost issue, I've been experimenting on gessoed paper. I use acid-free, heavy weight bristol that I coat with gesso. People here had recommended coating both sides. It doesn't wrinkle and is a nice surface to work on.

LarrySeiler
03-21-2001, 08:29 AM
In fact..if you gesso paper, you can even paint oils on it.

Acrylic does not have the acidic property that oils have, and I've read numerous times that if you actually chose to paint directly on a support without gessoing, you could. Most would opt to continue to gesso simply because they have learned to appreciate a feel or drag of the brush. You can paint on birch bark for Pete's sake with the stuff, so there really are no limits.

I have found acrylics on watercolor paper quite nice, gessoed or not. In fact, using acrylics as a substitute for watercolors is interesting. You can dilute it enough to get the watercolor response from it, but you don't have to worry about prior layers lifting and turning to mud. Of course, that's not purist.

I like to adhere canvas to masonite with acrylic medium, and paint oils and acrylics on that surface. Good luck...whichever you choose, I'm sure it will be fine! -Larry

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The Artsmentor

"Painting is easy when you don't know how, but very difficult when you do!" Edgar Degas

carly
03-21-2001, 09:08 AM
When I first began painting on location, instead of "wasting" good canvas, I took along an old watercolor pad. The acrylics painted so well on the paper, that I began to use it for studies and practice pieces. Some of those are 15 years old now and have never been framed...but still look great. No problems with the paper buckling..but I didn't paint with diluted acrylics either. If I were doing some works which I wanted to sell or to remain archival, I would definitely coat both sides of the paper with gesso to seal it properly.
carly

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"Everything is not art and Art is not everything, but it comes close."....carly

leesmith
03-21-2001, 06:10 PM
THANKS EVERYBODY! That was a big help. Looking forward to trying the gessoed paper!

Lee

VictoriaS
03-21-2001, 07:23 PM
Originally posted by leesmith:
Would it be best to use canvas board and have client omit the mat and glass

By the way, Leesmith: I have no first-hand experience with this, but they tell me you can frame a varnished acrylic painting without glass, even if it is on paper.

Sandi
03-21-2001, 09:55 PM
If you gesso it, do you have to stretch it first.. or does gesso take the place of stretching too?

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SKirk, visual artist (http://skirkart.artistnation.com/)
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Only those who dare to fail greatly can ever achieve greatly.
- Robert F. Kennedy
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"I wish, I wish! With all my heart. To fly with dragons in the land of art." Dragon Tales

Sandi
03-21-2001, 09:59 PM
You know, Strathmore Aquarius II papers don't need to be stretched.. I bet they wouldn't need gesso for brightness either. Hmm, I wonder.

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SKirk, visual artist (http://skirkart.artistnation.com/)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Only those who dare to fail greatly can ever achieve greatly.
- Robert F. Kennedy
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"I wish, I wish! With all my heart. To fly with dragons in the land of art." Dragon Tales

Keith Russell
03-21-2001, 11:03 PM
Greetings:

I paint using acrylics, sprayed with an airbrush, and have worked exclusively on illustration board for the last 20 or so years.

I now use an acid-free illustration board from Bainbridge; a 32 x 40 inch sheet costs about eleven bucks.

Illustration board is about 1/8 of an inch thick, and it is very rigid, yet not thick or heavy like stretched canvas. It also doesn't have the 'give' that canvas has, which I detest (and also doesn't work well with friskets, or frisket-cutting--airbrush techniques essential to my work.)

As a cost-effective, yet versatile alternative to canvas, you might check out the selection of illustration boards at you local art supply shop.

Keith.



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Keith Russell
Synthetic Sky Studios
Science Fiction Fine Art
[email protected]
artkc.com/russelk.htm

tammy
03-21-2001, 11:20 PM
I agree with all of the above! Love Acrylic as an all purpose everything. Agree with Larry. It works wonderful on Watercolor Paper. I love the gessoed paper too

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Don't worry, its gonna be all right....
Tammy's Home for Artists (http://tammy.artistnation.com)

VictoriaS
03-22-2001, 12:07 AM
I have done a few acrylic paintings on watercolor paper. It is worth the extra step of gessoing the paper; in my first acrylic on paper, I missed a few spots with the gesso, and the paint on those areas looks much duller than the paint on the gessoed part.

Victoria

VictoriaS
03-23-2001, 12:12 AM
Originally posted by Sandi:
If you gesso it, do you have to stretch it first.. or does gesso take the place of stretching too?



Sandi: If you're using acrylics like watercolors, I guess that because of the wetness the paper still might buckle if you don't stretch it. But if you're using the paints more like oils (leesmith said she paints opaquely on canvas), this problem doesn't occur. At least, in my limited experience, I've only seen the paper tend to curl very slightly -- not a problem.

Victoria