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View Full Version : Using Graphix Double Tack Mounting Film


artsygala
02-13-2010, 02:17 PM
I just ordered some 24 x 36 sheets and want to know, can I be frugal and just use strips of the film around the edges and maybe some strips in the middle of the paper to tack it to the mounting board, or should I be extravagant and tack the whole sheet?

Deborah Secor
02-13-2010, 03:42 PM
Gillian, a lot depends on the paper you're mounting and how heavy it is. You run the risk of having the paper slump.

I've never used the product you mentioned, but I did once tape some pieces of mat board to the back of a mat (as a spacer), and in time the whole face of the mat slumped down over the top of the spacer! It looked like a cat sleeping under the bedspread. I wonder if in time some papers might be inclined to slump where they aren't tacked down? You might call a friendly neighborhood framer and ask for some advice, if they're inclined to give it.

Hope some of the folks here have more specific info for you...

Deborah

artsygala
02-13-2010, 03:54 PM
Hi, Deborah,

Thanks for your response. I use Uart 400 grit, Wallis and Colourfix, so they are all substantial papers.

I was intrigued by the product after Paula Ford mentioned it. It sounded like a variation of dry mounting and much easier to apply than spray adhesives.

But, like you, I'm wondering if "slump" might be a possibility in the future if I go the cheap route and only adhere the sides and a few bits in the centre of the paper.

robertsloan2
02-13-2010, 04:07 PM
Maybe the safe way to go moderately frugal would be to cut the film into strips about an inch or two wide and space them apart across the whole area. An inch of film, an inch of space, that might work. I'd probably just use the sheet though since that would be so much simpler. Gaps might work if I had a piece left that was almost big enough though.

PeggyB
02-13-2010, 08:30 PM
I don't know if this is a concern for you, but the Graphix website does not say this product is archival as the Dick Blick site claims.

Here is what the Graphix site says about double tack mounting film: "This acrylic-based, acid free, adhesive backed, double sided adhesive film is heat resistant, transparent and won't yellow over time, it's tear resistant and bonds instantly to many surfaces; paper, fabric, wood, metal, plastic and glass."

This is how Dick Blick describes it: "Grafix is acid free and archival!"

Both sites say "acid free" however acid free does not mean archival. It may indeed be archival, but that information isn't given on the product's own website.

Now then, as to your original question. Given the papers you are using, there probably won't be a problem of buckeling so long as you use wide enough strips and plenty of them. If you are mounting full sheets of these papers I'd have greater concern for the weight of the paper pulling away from strips over time. In my opinion, cutting the strips and making certain there are enough of them to hold the weight of those papers isn't worth the few dollars you'll be saving. However, I've never used the Graphix double tack so this is completely a guess on my part. As many of you know, I have the good fortune to have a complete framing shop in my home, and access to professional framers' supplies. For those of you who don't know, I was able to inexpensively purchase all the equipment from the gallery/frame shop that I worked at when it went out of business.

Peggy

Paula Ford
02-13-2010, 09:31 PM
I use double tack and buy it in bulk :lol:

If using 11"x14" or smaller, I apply a full sheet to gatorboard (or acid-free foamboard if using 5"x7"). If using bigger than 11x14, I cut 4" strips and apply them around all four edges of the gatorboard and also use a +/-4" square in the middle of the board.

I use it with Uart and Wallis papers. The Uart bonds perfectly and stays put. When I use Wallis, the edges, less than a 1/16" of an inch comes up off the board, if at all, but that will be hidden under the frame and will press up against the spacer so I don't worry about it at all.

It's a great product and I don't have to deal with goopy, messy, spray adhesives and don't have to take it to a framer for dry mounting (which I've done and the paper didn't stay bonded so I wasted my money).

Studio-1-F
02-14-2010, 09:08 AM
If using bigger than 11x14, I cut 4" strips and apply them around all four edges of the gatorboard and also use a +/-4" square in the middle of the board.
Paula, does this arrangement hold up under wet underpainting? I know there can be vastly different definitions of "wet" among us, in this context, but does it feel secure? Just wondering what your 'gut feel' is.

Thanks in advance.

Jan

Paula Ford
02-14-2010, 11:54 AM
I don't remember if I've done a wet underpainting on a piece that is bigger than 11x14 with the bonded papers. The only reason why is because of the normal frame I use doesn't have a really deep rabbet so on bigger pieces I use Ampersand pastelbord. Also, sometimes I tone with dry pastel on big pieces.

So, I don't know Jan. My gut says when using Uart, there would be no problem, but would hesitate using Wallis because it does have a bit of a problem around the edges lifting in the first place.

With Uart, I don't see any problem.

adventureartist
02-14-2010, 03:55 PM
I color tone my Wallis papers first (wet), stretch while drying, THEN after it is completely dried I use the Grafix on foamboard. A whole sheet as I get mine in bulk also. I want the surface to be uniformly smooth. No problems, with UArt and Pastelmat doing and underpainting after fixing to the boards. As Paula has stated it really saves one that messy process of using glues and sprays. I use a burnisher (a rubber roller) to get the papers on with no bubbles. These arrangements are great for preparing boards for plein air.

Paula Ford
02-14-2010, 04:05 PM
Dru, Where do you get your double tack from?

artsygala
02-14-2010, 05:48 PM
I've decided to not be a cheapskate and I'll use a whole piece of Graphix.

I prepared my first boards today and it was so easy! All my papers adhered to museum board and foam core with no bubbles or sticky mess.

I also sent Graphix an email, asking them about archival quality and whether it can stand up to being wet. I also asked them if they tested it for longevity.

Deborah Secor
02-14-2010, 06:45 PM
Oooo, let us know what they say, Gillian. This may be a good solution for something I want to do. I'd love to know where you get this product in bulk, too...

Deborah

Paula Ford
02-14-2010, 06:52 PM
Misterart.com has a really good price on double tack. That is where I got my last shipment.

adventureartist
02-14-2010, 08:08 PM
That is where I get mine. Sorry it took all day to get back, I was out painting!

artsygala
02-15-2010, 01:45 PM
I just got an email from Jerry's: 15% off and free shipping for orders over $99.

For the 24 x 36 25 sheet pack, that means each sheet is $5.00. (free shipping)
For the 18 x 24 25 sheet pack, each sheet is $2.85 (not free shipping)

I'd order the 24 x 36 and cut them in half.

It says they are out of stock of both sizes, but they should honour the discount if you place an order.

ElsieH
02-15-2010, 03:25 PM
:wave:

Thanks for this great thread! I'm learning!
I have not yet tired this product and so am interesting in what various people are saying.:thumbsup:
Also, I'll be interested about what you hear from Graphix.

Blick Art Materials
02-15-2010, 05:04 PM
Hi All,
I wanted to clarify the Double Tack Mounting Film we carry, as I see there are some concerns over its archival qualitites. Grafix manufactures a secondary film that has a craft paper carrier, which would not be considered archival. However, the film we carry has a polyester carrier, which is archival. Rest assured, when using the film we carry, it will both preserve your work as well as itself! I personally use this extensively and have been very impressed with its durability and long term qualities.

Kristal

Peiwend
02-15-2010, 09:37 PM
Thank you all for sharing the great information in this thread. Have any of you tried Letraset/Bainbridge Studiotac adhesive in sheets? It seems to be similar to the Graphix Double Tack and claims to be archival on the package. I found a supplier (Currys) for the Studiotac in Canada but the large sheets of Double Tack would probably be expensive to ship to Canada.

I have a problem with large pastels (around 18" x 24" and larger) on Uart and Wallis buckling and slumping in the summer when it's very damp and humid here. Right now, I've started using archival liquid photographers adhesive to mount the paper to rag matboard but it's difficult and slow to do.

_________________________Wendell

Sonni
02-15-2010, 10:01 PM
There was some buckling with a watercolor underpainting on Wallis Paper when I used strips on a 12x16, instead of tacking down the entire support to matboard. I won't do that again.

ElsieH
02-15-2010, 11:02 PM
:wave:

Thanks, Krystal for clarifying the archival quality.

I think I'm going to give this stuff a try on Wallis.
I've been using PastelMat lately and really like the firm surface of the thicker paper. I do love Wallis, and I think this might help it have a firm base.

PeggyB
02-16-2010, 12:21 AM
Hi All,
I wanted to clarify the Double Tack Mounting Film we carry, as I see there are some concerns over its archival qualitites. Grafix manufactures a secondary film that has a craft paper carrier, which would not be considered archival. However, the film we carry has a polyester carrier, which is archival. Rest assured, when using the film we carry, it will both preserve your work as well as itself! I personally use this extensively and have been very impressed with its durability and long term qualities.

Kristal

Thanks Kristal. :thumbsup: It is good to know there are really two different varieties of this product available, and that Dick Blick can be relied upon to carry exactly what they describe. I hope everyone will be careful to know which one they are getting from other sources if archival qualities are a concern for them.

Peggy

artsygala
02-16-2010, 05:50 PM
I received a prompt reply from the Graphix representative, Katy.

There are two types. The acid-free archival film is clear while the non-archival is white.

She was interested in how pastellists are using the film. I told her about how some pastellists like to apply watercolour washes, or spread the pastel around with alcohol. She said the film was designed as a drymounting, and didn't know what effect moisture would have on it.

As for longevity, she didn't know, but as the film is acid-free, archival, non-yellowing and acrylic-based which remains flexible rather than becoming brittle, it is as safe a product, or more so, as other adhesives and drymounting films that are used.