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View Full Version : Buying an extended palette - with a catch


Wandrin_Dreamer
02-10-2010, 10:38 AM
I apologise for starting a thread that has been approached a hundred times already. My situation is somewhat different from the norm though. I am currently in South Korea, and every time I do a stint here, I make a point to learn new things. This time, I have decided to head into colour.

I would like to buy an extended palette, simply because I have loads of time to experiment and mess around. The other reason is that, with a lot of help with many translaters, I have (I hope) found out where a decent art shop is - 3 hours away on the underground/subway - so I don't want to be going back and forth a million times either at 6 hours a trip both ways.

I have been doing a lot of research here on what exactly I should buy. But, there is a catch. For starters, I have been told that cadmium yellow and red is not popular here and is therefore very difficult to impossible to find (this is at least according to the art teacher at the school I am teaching at). The closest I could find in the past was what is called 'permanent yellow' but it was transparent and a bit of a pain to use really. I have also never seen Alizarin Crimson, Paynes Grey (I used it a lot in oils - not that I have done too much work in oil either), purple (although they have violet), phthalo green or any other green besides sap or viridian. In the beginning, when I started this quest to find acrylic paint, I thought perhaps things were just named differently here, but that is not the case, I don't think. Maybe with a different culture comes different colours? Who knows.

Now I know the principle behind a limited palette - have the primaries and a warm and cool shade of each. I already managed to find the browns (siennas and umbers). My problem comes in (besides the whole language barrier, so I can't even ask for advice in art shops) is that I have no clue on what I am buying here unless it has a name I recognise from home or the forums here. I decided to do an experiment and buy a set palette from a shop nearby, so that I could see what the colours were like. It included neon colours :eek: (those were immediately donated to my classroom), and random things that I have never heard of like 'brilliant blue' (in whose opinion?), coral red (which looks more like shocking pink - it will also probably hit the classroom) and midium magenta (which I am assuming is supposed to be 'medium magenta' although it looks like baby pink to me). A colour that was of interest was 'carmine'. It is red, but definitely creates a really vivid pink tone when added to other colours. (Would that perhaps be the closest equivalent to Alizarin Crimson?) Titanium white is one of the few colours we all seem to have though. (I was particularly tempted to name this thread 'lost in translation'.)

Anyway, I don't know if anyone can really help me, or whether this is going to be a trial and error process. Does anyone know of any decent alternatives to cad yellow and red (besides Yellow Ochre for the yellow)? Any advice on alternative reds? What greens should I get? Anything else you think I might be able to use? Because of the lack of being able to find the colours by name, could I please, please ask if you could give the name of the colour (just in case luck is on my side) and then a quick description, eg. bluey green, so that if luck isn't on my side, I still have an idea of what I am looking for. (It is going to be a blooming nightmare trying to shop from the label though, because those are never accurate.)

Thank you for your help. I know I am asking a lot, but I just have no idea where else I can go for advice at this point in time.

sashntash
02-10-2010, 11:20 AM
My first two questions are :wave:

1) Do you know what brands are available at the shop you will be going to? Do they have a website that you could link to?? Either the shop or the brands that are available? It would be easier if we knew what the choices are in order to give any helpful advice.

2) Have you looked into the shipping costs of ordering from dickblick.com? I'm guessing that the costs would be prohibitive, but maybe not...

As far as colors are concerned:

Diarylide yellow is a good substitute for Cad Yellow Dark. It's a warm dark yellow. Finding a substitute for Cad Yellow Light is very difficult, in my experience, because all the other light yellows tend to be transparent.

For a Cad Red subsitute - you might like Pyrrole Red or Napthol Red.

I'm guessing that you will be able to find Ultramarine Blue for the "coolish" blue. Cerulean Blue is a nice greenish-blue.

It might be useful to look at the Golden Acrylics website. They have a color chart of their heavy body acrylics and if you click on the individual color swatch it takes you to more detailed info about that particular color. But you might be able to use their color chart to compare with the paints that you find in the art shop..

Here's the link:

http://www.goldenpaints.com/products/color/heavybody/heavybody.php

and here's the link to Winsor & Newton's color chart for their artist acrylics:

http://www.winsornewton.com/products/acrylic-colours/artists-acrylic-colour-/colour-chart/

Wandrin_Dreamer
02-10-2010, 11:47 AM
Hi! Thanks for responding.

I will see if I can ask one of the 'English' teachers to ask the art teacher about brands for me. I must admit that I didn't think about that. I know that what I have managed to find so far is called 'ShinHan', but I have no idea if it is a good paint or not. I went looking, after you mentioned it, and it seems that they pride themselves on 'safe paint', which I suppose explains the absense of cadmium... lol.

As to buying on line, I really wish that was an option. I can't get a credit card here as I am not Korean, and I can't get one at home, as I don't work there.

Anyway, thanks for your help so far. At least there might be more that I can do before I head off on my 6 hour adventure into unknown lands.

Ahh, look at the time. 1am! I have to head off now!

ETA: Sorry, I have just seen that you have added a lot more information. I will read it when I am more awake. THANK YOU for your help!

Margie L
02-10-2010, 11:51 AM
Good luck finding the colors you want. Are you in Korea teaching English? Perhaps the store you are going to will carry some western brands. Susan had good ideas about finding color charts on line.
For the red you found--try calming it down with a bit of one of your browns.
Are the paints sealed in the store? Could you sneak a peek at the color in the tube before purchasing it?
If in the end you cannot find good colors, you might use the colors they have to start your own new style Korean Fauvist!?
Best of luck
Margie

Einion
02-10-2010, 03:49 PM
I have been doing a lot of research here on what exactly I should buy.
In terms of colour and mixing possibilities 'extended palette' covers a lot of ground. Are you aiming to expand on the size/type of palette you're mostly familiar with or are you looking to try a wider range of pigments for comparison purposes?

There are many many threads here and Colour Theory if you want to read a range of views on palette choices and what they provide.

But, there is a catch. For starters, I have been told that cadmium yellow and red is not popular here and is therefore very difficult to impossible to find (this is at least according to the art teacher at the school I am teaching at). The closest I could find in the past was what is called 'permanent yellow' but it was transparent and a bit of a pain to use really.
I feel the same way about many options that stand in for Cadmium Yellow or Cadmium Red (two of the cornerstone pigments in my palette for most of my life). Bismuth Yellow, PY184, is something to look out for as an alternative, although it's not the equal of a cad yellow it's not nearly as transparent as other yellow pigments.

I have also never seen Alizarin Crimson, Paynes Grey (I used it a lot in oils - not that I have done too much work in oil either), purple (although they have violet), phthalo green or any other green besides sap or viridian.
Alizarin Crimson is (thankfully) almost unavailable in acrylics.

Payne's Grey is certainly made but obviously it's the type of thing that might not be in every maker's range.

Viridian is not commonly available in acrylic. Many paints that were or are labelled as Viridian will actually be hues, mostly based on PG7.

Now I know the principle behind a limited palette - have the primaries and a warm and cool shade of each.
That's a particular kind of palette: a split-primary or twin-primary palette. There are actually at least three major palettes other than this in common usage (not counting all the additional variations where people add earths, greens, oranges and violets as they see fit).

The most limited palette is a primary palette, with white that's only four paints. The best of them in terms of colour range uses paints that are roughly like the CMY inks used in magazine printing and now in inkjet printers. It's actually surprisingly versatile, but tends to be very transparent.

My problem comes in (besides the whole language barrier, so I can't even ask for advice in art shops) is that I have no clue on what I am buying here unless it has a name I recognise from home or the forums here.
Are the pigments listed on the tubes or in a leaflet by any chance?

Any advice on alternative reds? What greens should I get?
There are many possible reds, spanning a range of hues, but whether they're available to you is another question of course! PR112, PR170, PR188, PR209, PR254, PR255, PR264 (good substitute for Ali Crimson).

You don't need a green, greens can be considered a convenience colour - many painters use only one or none at all, preferring to mix everything from yellows, ochres, blues and black.

Einion

brusher
02-10-2010, 04:13 PM
Dear Wandrin':
In my opinion, Shin Han seems to be a very good maker. I have several of their tube watercolors and they are very good. I know their paints are sold many places here in the US also, so they are becoming more prominent in the market :) I think you could buy the acrylics locally without much worry.

Thanks, Cathy

Nilesh
02-10-2010, 04:29 PM
I apologise for starting a thread that has been approached a hundred times already. My situation is somewhat different from the norm though. I am currently in South Korea, and every time I do a stint here, I make a point to learn new things. This time, I have decided to head into colour.

I would like to buy an extended palette, simply because I have loads of time to experiment and mess around. The other reason is that, with a lot of help with many translaters, I have (I hope) found out where a decent art shop is - 3 hours away on the underground/subway - so I don't want to be going back and forth a million times either at 6 hours a trip both ways.

I have been doing a lot of research here on what exactly I should buy. But, there is a catch. For starters, I have been told that cadmium yellow and red is not popular here and is therefore very difficult to impossible to find (this is at least according to the art teacher at the school I am teaching at). The closest I could find in the past was what is called 'permanent yellow' but it was transparent and a bit of a pain to use really. I have also never seen Alizarin Crimson, Paynes Grey (I used it a lot in oils - not that I have done too much work in oil either), purple (although they have violet), phthalo green or any other green besides sap or viridian. In the beginning, when I started this quest to find acrylic paint, I thought perhaps things were just named differently here, but that is not the case, I don't think. Maybe with a different culture comes different colours? Who knows.

Now I know the principle behind a limited palette - have the primaries and a warm and cool shade of each. I already managed to find the browns (siennas and umbers). My problem comes in (besides the whole language barrier, so I can't even ask for advice in art shops) is that I have no clue on what I am buying here unless it has a name I recognise from home or the forums here. I decided to do an experiment and buy a set palette from a shop nearby, so that I could see what the colours were like. It included neon colours :eek: (those were immediately donated to my classroom), and random things that I have never heard of like 'brilliant blue' (in whose opinion?), coral red (which looks more like shocking pink - it will also probably hit the classroom) and midium magenta (which I am assuming is supposed to be 'medium magenta' although it looks like baby pink to me). A colour that was of interest was 'carmine'. It is red, but definitely creates a really vivid pink tone when added to other colours. (Would that perhaps be the closest equivalent to Alizarin Crimson?) Titanium white is one of the few colours we all seem to have though. (I was particularly tempted to name this thread 'lost in translation'.)

Anyway, I don't know if anyone can really help me, or whether this is going to be a trial and error process. Does anyone know of any decent alternatives to cad yellow and red (besides Yellow Ochre for the yellow)? Any advice on alternative reds? What greens should I get? Anything else you think I might be able to use? Because of the lack of being able to find the colours by name, could I please, please ask if you could give the name of the colour (just in case luck is on my side) and then a quick description, eg. bluey green, so that if luck isn't on my side, I still have an idea of what I am looking for. (It is going to be a blooming nightmare trying to shop from the label though, because those are never accurate.)

Thank you for your help. I know I am asking a lot, but I just have no idea where else I can go for advice at this point in time.
There are a lot of el-cheapo paints in that part of the world. Many of the colors are not lightfast. If you are serious about learning, you are probably best advised to seek out quality colors and pigments. If possible, the tubes or jars should give the pigment index names, not just the 'poetic' names.

There are many other yellows and reds. Cadmiums are not necessary for most artists' uses. Some artists will use whatever else they can most of the time, and reserve the cads for situations where they need them. There are things the cads can't do that the others can do, and vice versa. Most (perhaps all) of your needs can almost certainly be met with the alternatives. There is more than a bit of inertia when it comes to changing palettes and adopting relatively new pigments.

If you want to explore the many alternatives, there are some web resources that you might enjoy. The most in-depth and thorough is probably handprint.com. It is much larger than it appears at first, and there is *much* detail about individual pigments.

There is also *much* detail about different palettes and the theories behind them.

If you are an 'in-depth' kind of study, this might be the site for you.
[Personally, I find it a bit otiose -- much of the information is superfluous for most of us; and it also takes certain perspectives (predominantly at least, or very predominantly) -- certain traditional academic/scientific/theoretical perspectives or orientations. I realize that most people feel it is somewhat sacrilegious or heretical to criticize such a great man and website, and that genuflection is the only proper stance in relation to them. My apologies for blaspheming the Emperor of endless impressive dribble. I take that back. He isn't that bad. It's just that it's all a bit much (verging on absurd) in some ways, and there are more concise and to-the-point ways of dealing with all these things.]

Nilesh
02-10-2010, 04:46 PM
Another way of finding alternatives is to go to dickblick.com and find out what the different acrylic paint lines have for opaque yellows and reds. You can also go to individual paint manufacturers' sites for this information. But the Blick site has it more readily available, once you learn how to navigate the color swatches and find the pigment index names.

Once you find the pigment index names, you can use handprint.com for a reference.

If you use unknown or inferior pigments or mixes, your learning will be skewed somewhat -- if you use other pigments in the future (higher quality, single-pigment colors, for example), they will mix differently and often give a different appearance, and have other properties that differ.

So it's probably better to learn with the quality paints to begin with.

Handprint.com can also provide you with a very wide range of palette options, from minimalist to very extended.

There is also a good discussion there of the six-color warm/cool-primary palettes and refinements or improvements on them.

Nilesh
02-10-2010, 07:32 PM
There might be some information here that would be of interest:

http://artschoolathome.wordpress.com/category/colour/

Andun
02-10-2010, 07:53 PM
I taught in Korea about 15 years ago and had all the same problems you mention here about paint and the credit card. I took care of it so easily by asking my sister back in Canada to order through Dick Blick and had Blick send it to me while she paid with her credit card and my bank(Citibank)send the money to her account. Simple and hassle free.(Gotta love the internet and email:))

Wandrin_Dreamer
02-11-2010, 07:15 AM
Wow! You guys are amazing!

You have given me a million ideas to help fix this inconvenience.

sashntash: Thank you SO much for mentioning the colour charts. It seems so obvious now, I have no idea why I didn't think of it! I will now go in with a good idea of what I am looking for. Thank you!

Margie L: Thanks for the idea of toning down the rather shocking red with one of the browns. It is things like that that I am particularly clueless about at this point in time. And yes, I am an English teacher. :D

Einion: I don't know where to begin with your contribution. You are clearly very knowledgeable on the subject of colour palettes. I will go where you have directed me and do some more research before I head off tomorrow to go and find some paint. They do have the pigments on the tubes, not that I really have a clue what they mean at this point in time. Thanks though for the pigments you have given me. If I can find those, then I should be on my way to getting what I need.

Cathy: Thanks for the heads up that ShinHan is not bad. If I can't find something better, at least I won't feel like I am completely throwing my money away.

Nilesh: You are another person who seems particularly knowledgeable. I will head off to handprint.com, as I know I have loads to learn. I will also make sure that I get decent paints. I don't really want to sit here wasting my time, and I would like to actually learn something valuable while I am here. That last link you sent also seems to have a lot of interesting information on it. Thanks a ton for all your help! It is really appreciated!

Anthony: I am glad that I am not the only one who found the artshop transition quite different. I wish I could ask my folks to send me what I am after, but to be honest, the SA postal system is not reliable, and if they courier it to me, it is going to end up being the most expensive paint around! (I am saving those requests for emergency clothing needs... lol.) How long were you here for? Where were you situated?

Anyway, a general thanks again. I have my homework cut out for me tonight. In a mad stroke of luck, I managed to get tomorrow off, so I think I will head off on my long trip instead of heading off to school. If the directions I have been given are remotely accurate, I will find the place. I can't wait. I can then use my long weekend to get stuck in and do something. (If nothing else, I need to break the monotony of yellow-brown walls, brown furniture, brown floor and white table top.)

Thanks a ton for all your responses. I feel a lot more confident about going tomorrow. :D

sashntash
02-11-2010, 07:39 AM
Good luck !!!

And please do give us a full report when you get back.... Can't wait to hear what you found...

maryinasia
02-11-2010, 08:15 AM
To make a point to learn new things, have you considered exploring the traditional Korean water colors?

Wandrin_Dreamer
02-12-2010, 04:24 AM
Oh WOW... That was expensive! I blew almost the equivalent of my monthly expenses in 45 minutes! Apparently, this is the only place that imports paint, so thank Merlin I was able to actually find brands and colours I recognised. But I think they flew this lot in from the States first class! (The tubes average US$20 each!!!!!)

Anyway, I managed to find cad red med and cad yellow med (and got 2 tubes each). I also got napthol red, lemon yellow, cerulean blue, phthalo blue (red), ultramarine blue (I couldn't decide what I wanted in the blues, so I am hoping that I didn't screw up there), dioxazine purple (because I was curious, didn't see the price at that point, and then forgot to put it back), payne's grey (because I really liked using it in oils and I figured it would spare me the headache of trying to make it all the time - I have my heating set a bit high for acrylic so everything dries at a ridiculous rate) and 2 tubes of tit white. I also bought 2 canvases, although in hindsight, I probably should have got more, as those ARE cheap - well, when compared to home.

I think the next thing I need to do is determine whether the ShinHan acrylic is good, because that is a tenth of the price and makes me feel a little more at ease when it comes to experimenting.

Anyway, you guys were really great. I was actually surprised that I did find imported paint. I really thought it was going to be a lot more difficult than that (which is why I wanted to go completely prepared so that I would be able to figure my way around what I needed/wanted).
I didn't end up getting a very large palette, but at that price, I would end up being the stereotypical 'poor artist' if I had.

As a general thought about selecting a palette, I think it all comes down to personal preference. From all the reading I have done here over the past few weeks, I have noticed that people I consider really good artists have palettes (and comments) that 'contradict' other folks that I consider really good too. I suppose it comes from experience, 'feel' and, as I said, personal preference. I think that is also what made this whole process incredibly daunting. I don't know what I would prefer as I haven't tried before.

Maryinasia: It sounds like a good idea. I will see what I can find out about it. Maybe the art teacher at my school can show me a thing or two in it.

Thanks again for all the help and support. I can't wait to start now (although the whopping price tag on that journey has made me rather nervous).

Andun
02-12-2010, 04:33 AM
I lived in Chamshil which is in Seoul between Olympic park and Lotte world. I lived there for two years but am much happier in Japan. So easy to get supplies:)

Wandrin_Dreamer
02-12-2010, 05:19 AM
I lived in Chamshil which is in Seoul between Olympic park and Lotte world. I lived there for two years but am much happier in Japan. So easy to get supplies:)

I will definitely keep that in mind. I was actually tempted to do Japan this time around, but chickened out because I would then have to learn another language. (I can do all the basic things in Korean... just not ask difficult questions about art things... lol).

Andun
02-12-2010, 05:33 AM
Trust me..Japanese is much easier to learn than Korean:) and...the Yen is much stronger than the Won too:)

sashntash
02-12-2010, 09:43 AM
Thanks for the follow-up report !!!

So glad you found some good stuff. I think you made excellent choices of colors. Cerulean blue, phthalo blue and ultramarine will be all you need!! And your choices of reds and yellows give you a good range also.

As you said, the choice of colors is based on personal preference after a lot of experimenting. But you now have a good palette to start from....

What brands did you find??

sashntash
02-12-2010, 09:45 AM
ohhhh... just a caution with the phthalo blue if you aren't used to it.

It's a beautiful and useful color, but it is very very strong. Use just a tiny bit of it in mixes, otherwise it will overpower all other colors.

Einion
02-12-2010, 11:21 AM
Oh WOW... That was expensive! ...(The tubes average US$20 each!!!!!)
Ouch!

Glad you were able to find cad red and yellow, in certain ways there really is no substitute for them. The Lemon Yellow is probably PY3, which is a decent choice for this type of yellow.

A form of French Ultramarine is one of the two key blues to get IMO, so that's ideal. Phthalo Blue GS is a better choice as a pairing with ultramarine than the red shade but it's not a big deal. Cerulean Blue unfortunately tends to be expensive (even before the import markup!) and although it definitely has some uses frankly it's easily substituted for.

Dioxazine Purple is arguably the violet pigment in modern painting so it's no bad thing to have it on hand. Not sure which naphthol you got but it'll provide you with different options in this area, being such a different pigment to cad red - the tints and other mixtures are not alike and it's much more transparent, which allows for different uses.

...payne's grey (because I really liked using it in oils and I figured it would spare me the headache of trying to make it all the time...
As you're probably aware this is usually a simple mixture of French Ultramarine and a black. If you want to make up a batch of a colour that you intend to use in future paintings it can keep quite well in a 35mm film container if you have any. But any small jar with a decent seal will work pretty well; any babyfood jars around?

As far as the very fast drying goes, this is a big deal with standard acrylics. Lots of prior threads on various ways to combat it, as well as to live with it.

I also bought 2 canvases, although in hindsight, I probably should have got more, as those ARE cheap - well, when compared to home.
You can also paint on paper (primed or unprimed), hardboard, MDF, plywood and even cardboard. More in the November 2004 classroom (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=227402) thread.

I think the next thing I need to do is determine whether the ShinHan acrylic is good, because that is a tenth of the price and makes me feel a little more at ease when it comes to experimenting.
Other than consistency/viscosity, which can be some pointer to relative quality, one good way is to do a direct side-by-side mixing comparison.

For example, take your Ultramarine and white from ShinHan and another maker and make two 1:1 mixtures (try to be as precise as possible). If the tint using the ShinHan white is much darker then you know there's less white pigment in the paint.

As a general thought about selecting a palette, I think it all comes down to personal preference.
Very much so. See the number of different ones in these two threads from Colour Theory, Show us your palette colors and tell us why: 2001-2005 (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=2494) and Show us your palette colors and tell us why: 2006-present (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=511425)!

From all the reading I have done here over the past few weeks, I have noticed that people I consider really good artists have palettes (and comments) that 'contradict' other folks that I consider really good too.
Yep, that's a good way of putting it - it's very easy to find a painter that considers a given colour indispensable that another painter (even one doing very similar work) does not own.

Einion

Wandrin_Dreamer
02-13-2010, 04:02 AM
Anthony Dunphy: Trust me..Japanese is much easier to learn than Korean:) and...the Yen is much stronger than the Won too:)

Ahhh... You're kidding me! I should have gone to Japan then! Oh well... when Sept comes, my contract will be up, and I will definitely think about it!

sashntash: It was my pleasue. I was a bit nervous about posting it, in case I had made a huge mistake. As I said, even though I had done a lot of research, I still felt pretty clueless about what I wanted/needed.

Thanks also for the tip on Phthalo Blue. I will start off with a very light hand! :D

Einion, where do I begin to thank you?

Einion: As you're probably aware this is usually a simple mixture of French Ultramarine and a black.

Actually, I had heard so many different answers to that that I wasn't aware. I have heard everything from burnt (or was it raw?) sienna and cobalt blue, to cobalt blue and black. As I have never had a feeling of 'warmth' from Payne's Grey, I discredited the sienna option. Really, lol, the internet needs to sort out all its misinformation!

LOL, no baby food jars around here. I am too restless still to think about anything like that yet. But I do have the perfect containers for it back in SA. I will see what I can find here. I am sure I can improvise somewhere.

You can also paint on paper (primed or unprimed), hardboard, MDF, plywood and even cardboard. More in the November 2004 classroom (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=227402) thread.

I have tried a bit on paper, but I must admit that there is something about the texture of canvas that appeals to me. I will try painting on hardboard etc. when I get home, as that will just be too heavy to fly back when my contract is up - and, knowing my connection with Murphey's law, the day I paint something on hardboard here, is the day I am going to fall head over heels in love with it, and not be able to part with it. I am hoping with canvas that, if I take the canvas off the frames when I am leaving, then I can just roll them up and stick them in a tube, and then fight with them to remount them when I get back home - that is if there is anything worth saving when I am done (and the dust has had its say - Korean dust is sticky, and stains EVERYTHING yellow, even your clothes if you don't wear and wash them often).

For example, take your Ultramarine and white from ShinHan and another maker and make two 1:1 mixtures (try to be as precise as possible). If the tint using the ShinHan white is much darker then you know there's less white pigment in the paint.

Now that sounds like an excellent idea. I am going to try that as soon as I have finished posting here. (Housework can wait a bit...) If they turn out to not be a poorer quality, then maybe I can save myself a ton of cash for everything except the cadmiums. :D And that would be a relief!

Thanks again to all for your invaluable advice and information. This is one of my favourite websites (even if I lurk a LOT more than I post) as there is sooo much to learn here. :thumbsup:

old_hobbyist
02-13-2010, 12:41 PM
IMHO, I'd follow Margie's suggestion start your own new style Korean Fauvist I have been doing a lot of research here on what exactly I should buy. Instead it is apparent to me that you've formed a really good excuse to NOT paint!

Wandrin_Dreamer
02-13-2010, 09:49 PM
Instead it is apparent to me that you've formed a really good excuse to NOT paint!

Actually, LOL, that is the furthest from the truth. I have finished 1,5 canvases in a week and a half (done with the tubes I had bought earlier). I only come on here to research when I get stuck. But I was wanting to get decent colours, and as I was not sure what I could use in the Korean paint section, I decided this would be the best place to ask. One thing that is a lot nicer with painting than with sketching or charcoal, is that if a mistake is made, it can just be painted over. Too many mistakes with pencil, and it means the paper is damaged, and well, a bugger up with charcoal on paper, and you need to start all over again. The closest I have come to being nervous to start painting is the day I bought the new paints - because that was RATHER expensive. And as I work (mentally) in SA Rands, I know that the equivalent of that total cost is almost half a starting teachers salary at home!

sashntash
02-14-2010, 07:50 AM
Research is always good :wink2:

I can't imagine being in a foreign country, unable to speak the language, and trying to buy paints in an art supply store... not to mention the distance you had to travel to do it.

I'm glad that your research has been successful and that you now have some decent paints to use.....

You're on your way !!!! Happy painting... and don't forget to post some of your efforts !!!

Einion
02-15-2010, 03:44 AM
Trust me..Japanese is much easier to learn than Korean:)
Given the written aspect of the language I wouldn't be too sure - the curator of the Japanese print collection in the V&A told me this about Japanese, "After you've been learning it for six years then you have to decide whether you want to continue..." :eek:

Although compared to English both are easier :D


Einion, where do I begin to thank you?
De nada. That's what we're here for.

Actually, I had heard so many different answers to that that I wasn't aware. I have heard everything from burnt (or was it raw?) sienna and cobalt blue, to cobalt blue and black.
...
Really, lol, the internet needs to sort out all its misinformation!
On the palette people can mix the same sort of colour in multiple ways; commercial versions have been relatively standardised on the French Ultramarine + black for a while.

As I have never had a feeling of 'warmth' from Payne's Grey, I discredited the sienna option.
FWIW a mixture of a blue and an earth can easily have no hint that there's a glowing earth like Burnt Sienna hidden in the mixture - once it's fully blended it's just a homogeneous grey or blackish paint.

Einion

Imzadi
02-15-2010, 04:28 AM
You might look on the internet for sources and websites in Australia that could ship to you. They may carry some of the U.S. brand paints.