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Epicurea
02-27-2001, 06:46 AM
How should I seal plywood panels in order to paint on them (acrylics)? Will acrylic gesso seal it properly or do I need to do something else to it first?

Cassandra

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Blessed are they who can laugh at themselves, for they shall never cease to be amused.

tammy
02-27-2001, 11:26 PM
I would normally say, use Gesso on the panels but let I did the 1/8 thick ones and they did fine. When I did 1/4 thick one, the gesso chipped off the sides of the panels after it dried so I'm still not sure.
I think some would probably tell you to use pure gesso instead of the acrylic.

Either way, put coats of gesso on the front, back and sides of the panels is what I gather.

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Don't worry, its gonna be all right....
Tammy's Home for Artists (http://tammy.artistnation.com)

Dima
02-28-2001, 05:32 PM
Hello Cassandra and Tammy,

I am wrestling with the same question and trying to find out what would be good practice I use 'Caparol capaplex', a product from Germany or 'Lascaux varnish 575' from Switzerland. Cannot tell you which is the best, but both are recommended for that special purpose.
I haven't used plywood but use it to seal MDF board.
I know that some manufacturers like Talens sell a thing as 'sizing' and that should be what to look for; but then the question is for what surface is it suited.
Tammy, the question is how to seal a very absorbent ground so that it will hold the gesso as one integral layer.

Dick

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Epicurea
03-02-2001, 05:43 AM
A friend told me this yesterday: Gesso is enough to seal it, but first it needs a support. Make a box frame or H frame out of 1x2's and nail the plywood to it through the front...wood glue is optional, but she's of the opinion that it doesn't really help much since it will eventually break down. Then seal with an initial coat of thinned gesso, let dry, repeat with thicker coats, just like gessoing anything else.

Anybody else have any suggestions?


Cassandra

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Blessed are they who can laugh at themselves, for they shall never cease to be amused.

"The worst enemy to creativity is self-doubt." -- Sylvia Plath

carly
03-03-2001, 05:59 PM
I hope I understood this right...you make an H frame for the back of the board and nail thru the board (in the center?).

I'm assuming this is to keep the board from warping but gesso over a nail would not adhere very well. If I were going to attach the board to a frame, I'd wait until the painting were completed then block it into a frame.
carly

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"Everything is not art and Art is not everything, but it comes close."....carly

Epicurea
03-03-2001, 07:41 PM
Yep, that's what she told me, nail through then gesso over wood & nails. So far I've only used gesso on paper & canvas, so I wouldn't know how it would adhere to metal. This was how she learned to prepare wood panels in college (majored in painting), but different artists do things differently, and a lot of the time instructors teach whatever methods *they* use and/or like.

I'm pretty sure she told me that she's done this herself, so I'll make sure to ask her about the adherence of gesso to the nails.

It just occurred to me...some artists paint on metal sheets (I've been thinking about trying it myself). Acrylic doesn't adhere well to smooth surfaces (so it makes sense that gesso wouldn't hold well on metal, including nails, either), so preparation involves scuffing/sanding (as with preparing glass for acrylic) to create a rougher surface. Which leads me to think that maybe I could nail a wood panel to a frame, then sand the whole thing, then gesso it?


Cassandra

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Blessed are they who can laugh at themselves, for they shall never cease to be amused.

"The worst enemy to creativity is self-doubt." -- Sylvia Plath

[This message has been edited by Epicurea (edited March 03, 2001).]

ReNae
03-04-2001, 01:48 PM
Cassandra,

One thing you should remember about wood, it will absorb the humidity in the air. I would also suggest sealing the sides and back with a varnish/sealant of some sort. You do not want moisture to get into the wood and 'bleed' through.


Warmth,
ReNae

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The bird sings not because it has an answer. The bird sings for it has a song.

fmarsh
03-06-2001, 05:21 AM
I would not even consider nailing through the panel. The nails will move in time, and logic tells me that they will also oxidise. Glue the panel to the cradle.


I seal by coating the panel with clear acrlic medium, back front and sides, Then coat with 3 to 4 thin coats of acrylic gesso, sanding finely between each. You could also use bunny glue to size and traditional gesso.

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Paintings of Australia, France & Scotland (http://www.geocities.com/fjmarsh)

cuttlefish
03-07-2001, 04:10 PM
Bunny glue (and other natural animal, vegetable, and dairy derived adhesives) is a very bad thing to use with acrylics. It's great stuff for oils since the oil seals the glue from moisture, allowing the glue sizing to maintain a barirer between the paint and support; but aqueous media like acrylic will just make it all gooey and will weaken the paint film and make the paint resoluble as it mixes with it.

Sandi
03-08-2001, 03:33 PM
Make sure you clean it with rubbing alcohol first to remove the hand oils, then ... oh heck! I almost forgot Keith's link. Go here: http://www.sonic.net/finearts/index.html

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SKirk, visual artist (http://skirkart.artistnation.com/)
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Only those who dare to fail greatly can ever achieve greatly.
- Robert F. Kennedy

Epicurea
03-18-2001, 09:28 PM
Thanks for the link...had it bookmarked a long time ago but had forgotten about it.

Thanks all for the comments. This is turning out to look complicated & time consuming & expensive enough that I think I may just go with sheet metal...no sealing, no supports/braces, no nails, no glues, just a once over with the metal-brush attachment on a hand-held grinder & you're all set. And it's SHINY. http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/biggrin.gif


Cassandra

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Blessed are they who can laugh at themselves, for they shall never cease to be amused.

"The worst enemy to creativity is self-doubt." -- Sylvia Plath