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View Full Version : Talens Rembrandts dont blend well?


JPQ
01-22-2010, 08:33 PM
Talens Rembrandts dont blend well? currently i have only 3 hues and with these is hard think this thing i mean these are so close in hue and value... Actually maybe some uses if these dont blend well is usefull feature.

*Deirdre*
01-23-2010, 09:45 AM
I think most of your question is answered here (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=600313&highlight=talens+rembrandts) but if not a search for Talens Rembrandt blend should bring up the subject.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/23-Jan-2010/33616-Search-pastels.gif

Hope that helps!

Phil Coleman
01-23-2010, 02:45 PM
Rembrandts blend exceptionally well!

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/23-Jan-2010/114684-00001XX.jpg

JPQ
01-23-2010, 04:08 PM
I think really well. even i dont know how many pastels used here. ps. btw now seems very nice product for backgrounds becouse even harder than w&n softiest hues but at least constant hardness.

pastelist
01-23-2010, 05:22 PM
I agree they blend quite well. I also have been using them for years for that quality. It night be the paper being used. I use sanded pastel paper.

JPQ
01-23-2010, 07:03 PM
i dont use sanded i dont even know where i can get sanded paper.

Colorix
01-23-2010, 07:13 PM
Very expensive from England.

Charlie

pastelist
01-23-2010, 09:58 PM
It runs about $9.00 a sheet (32 x40) @ Daniel Smith or Cheap Joe's. There is also Wallis Paper through Dick Blick.

*Deirdre*
01-23-2010, 10:15 PM
i dont use sanded i dont even know where i can get sanded paper.
The Paper thread is here (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=549160) There is usually a way of getting these from online suppliers - if you can't find them locally.

Colorix
01-24-2010, 07:33 AM
For Europeans, it is often smarter to buy from a country beloinging to the EU, as then we pay the taxes in the country we buy from, and only have to add the transport cost ('only', as it is always more expensive when crossing borders). Smartest for us is to buy European supplies in Europe. And buy the American brands from the US, and count int taxes, duties, transport, and other fees.

Jackson's in England carry the Fisher 400, for example, and also Clirefontaine PastelMat. (Not the Pans, though. To see where you can get pans, go to their website, they list all retailers.)

And, yes, it costs more to import stuff. On the other hand, when a shop imports, they of course add the same costs, plus whatever needed to pay for the shop, the staff, the electricity, etc.

Charlie

JPQ
01-24-2010, 10:32 AM
For Europeans, it is often smarter to buy from a country beloinging to the EU, as then we pay the taxes in the country we buy from, and only have to add the transport cost ('only', as it is always more expensive when crossing borders). Smartest for us is to buy European supplies in Europe. And buy the American brands from the US, and count int taxes, duties, transport, and other fees.

Jackson's in England carry the Fisher 400, for example, and also Clirefontaine PastelMat. (Not the Pans, though. To see where you can get pans, go to their website, they list all retailers.)

And, yes, it costs more to import stuff. On the other hand, when a shop imports, they of course add the same costs, plus whatever needed to pay for the shop, the staff, the electricity, etc.

Charlie

you talk pans Pan pastels their found zinkvit in sweden. At least.

Colorix
01-24-2010, 11:27 AM
Yes, Pans, in *sets* only, are available in Sweden. I'm very impressed with the Pan-people, they are great at marketing.

robertsloan2
01-24-2010, 11:27 AM
I have Rembrandts that blend as well as any of my other pastels. They didn't give me any problems.

It could be the difference between plain paper and sanded papers. Art Spectrum Colourfix is my favorite sanded paper. It's cheaper to get the Art Spectrum Colourfix primer and put two smooth thin coats on good 140lb watercolor paper. I make all my practice paper just using cheaper watercolor paper and the same primer.

You can try different sanded papers by getting a sampler from Dakota Pastels. Wallis is the roughest with very deep tooth, a lot of people love Wallis. Don't try to finger blend on Wallis or you'll lose your fingerprints and try Blood Blending on your painting, which only works well in dark areas.

How to blend is the other part of it. You can blend with your fingers, that's common and probably the first thing anyone learns. If the hues and values are very close, sometimes you can't tell that they're blended. Try two colors that are very different for blending tests, one light and one dark.

Then try blending with other things. A rubber tipped Colour Shaper is a wonderful blending tool, you can go back and forth over a hard edge to soften it with that or use it to move color around. The sample video from Deborah Secor's pastel landscape painting video on ArtistNetworkTV shows Deborah explaining and demonstrating a Colour Shaper and its uses.

You can also use a chamois, a bit of tissue paper, toilet paper or paper towel. Some people use cotton buds to blend. Some people use inexpensive cardboard tortillon or stump blenders, these are cheap anywhere and good for blending pencils as well as pastels.

Finally, there's the method I learned from Colorix in ESP: Colourful Still Life, which I think Deborah Secor also mentioned in ESP: Snow. You can blend with the sticks. Try putting two very different colors right next to each other. Take a third that's between them and start going back and forth between the areas in short angled strokes, scribble back and forth.

This blends the colors together in a beautiful way that leaves a little texture and a lot of sparkle. Some blending methods break down the crystalline structure of the pigments but stick-blending doesn't. The results look more fresh and colorful than most blending methods.

Also, I forgot to mention that you can use a fan brush to do some light blending too. This is a very gentle blender and softens edges without making much dramatic changes to what you have down.

Try these different methods. It may not be the Rembrandts but the way you're handling them. If other brands blend more easily for you, that may be how you're handling them with pressure and what type of marks you make. Each brand has a different texture and people's "hand" varies a lot, so trying different brands and techniques is good.

Lyta
01-24-2010, 02:32 PM
You can get individual PanPastels via amazon.co.uk; however, I don't know if they're well-packaged for shipping, haven't ordered any yet. The pricing looks reasonable.

Robert, very nice collection of techniques! (Even though I only use pastel pencils...) But blood blending seriously bothers me. :eek: Blood isn't even archival. :evil:

JPQ
01-24-2010, 04:06 PM
i know place which is closer to me which have pan pastels what i allredy know. But if you talk other people forget this...

robertsloan2
01-24-2010, 04:31 PM
Lyta, I was joking. I don't think even serious goth painters go for blood blending on pastels on purpose. It just happens nastily when finger blending on Wallis. Besides, dried blood never gives that beautiful color fresh blood has, for that you need good sticks.

JPQ, it's great that you can get Pan Pastels in Finland. I love mine and they are the ultimate for easy blending. The Sofft tools can also be used as blenders for stick pastels. They're great for that.

JPQ
01-24-2010, 06:20 PM
I found pan pastels form sweden. and i like pure pigment colours. I not yet testet them but i maybe someday order these and few other stuff form Sweden shop what is allredy mentioned (other reasons) i looked their contact information for idea but i found they allredy sell them.
ps. both reds have own place like all colours. some things are normal other colours than others and some colours says all is not normal.

Colorix
01-24-2010, 06:21 PM
JPQ, I get it now, zinkvitt, the online store! Sorry I misunderstood you.

Charlie

JPQ
01-25-2010, 02:58 PM
JPQ, I get it now, zinkvitt, the online store! Sorry I misunderstood you.

Charlie

No harmdone. ps. buy maybe latter in this year depends how fast i get other important stuff. i think these are good solution making backgrounds. when we talk large areas and even some works what are fully made with pan pastels look nice even these dont look traditional pastel works which is not important to me to me only what art looks/sounds is important not how is done. even my current selection reqular soft pastels i can mix so wide colour range i think. actually i think when i use correct brands to me (maybe what i know now is mainly Schimcke,Sennlier and Pan Pastels,and pan pastels and sennlier comment based what i see made with them and i mention only brands what i can get easily) i dont need over 200 pastels. and 200 is bare maxium. even smaller amount in my style can work i think. even current set only few thing are very hard. dark greens but these hand made ones i have so nice yellows and blues which i can use mixing some really nice greens.

JPQ
01-25-2010, 03:07 PM
Yes, Pans, in *sets* only, are available in Sweden. I'm very impressed with the Pan-people, they are great at marketing.

I think one by one is zinkwit (i maybe type this becouse i dont good in typing) site. ps. offtopic how when is mixing features in koh-i-noor soft pastels and daler rowney soft pastels ? and how good their lightfastness is.