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joypainter66
01-16-2010, 08:23 PM
Artisan paints by Winsor Newton are the greatest for the look and feel of oils without the fumes of turp or other solvents. I switched to them from regular oils about 5 years ago and enjoy painting on Gessoboard with Artisan brushes. Cleanup is just soap and water. The trick is to use as little water as possible; paint using only paint (the brush should just be damp, not wet). Drying time is about the same as regular oils. I'd love to communicate with others who enjoy using water mixable oils.

herzeleid
01-18-2010, 12:54 PM
I really enjoy these paints as well, I came to these from using Acrylics for my whole painting-life. I wanted to start using oils because I was not happy with the super fast drying time of acrylics, and I wanted a smoother blendability with oils. I researched regular oils (as I had NEVER touched them before) and found that the process was really quite complicated!! Then I saw the W&N Artisan Oils, and thought "Hmm, everyone seems to like this and they say they act just like real oils!" Well, I ended up getting a set of both regular oils and the Artisan oils for my birthday, and I can say they do both act exactly the same! I don't have the means to set up a whole huge "oil painting station", so it's very convenient for me to use the Artisans that use only water.

Joy, do you have some examples of your WMO's work? I would love to see :)

Coquette
01-18-2010, 01:33 PM
I am also a fan of Artisan paints :wave: While I was in school there was a gentleman who came in to my painting class and did a demo for W&N paint. When he left he gave everyone a starter pack of the Artisan paint. Since I live in a small apartment and can't ventilate for turpentine and other solvents very well, the Artisan paint was exactly what I needed. One of the things I like best is the buttery quality of the paint and blending is a breeze.

Consuelo

dspinks
01-18-2010, 04:52 PM
Consuelo, that's exactly how I got my introduction to Artisans! I was only just starting to learn to draw and was VERY afraid of color, so they sat in my supply closet until I felt confident enough to crack them open. I'm glad I finally did, as I really like using them.

mplsmarjorie
01-18-2010, 09:07 PM
I am loving w/m oils - my favorite is WN Artisan. It seems like the most buttery. I made the transition from watercolor, so it took me a while to let go and just let the paint be thick. I love it now, and only dip my brush in a little water/blended with some w/m linseed oil to get started. Then before you know it, I am just painting with paint, no thinner. They are bloody expensive, but so is regular oil. I am getting very clever with coupons from Utrecht, and the prices from Cheap Joe's Artstuff are very good, too. When they have free shipping events I load up. I am also experimenting with black gesso, which is very cool to work on. I have noticed that if I let the oils dry for a few days and go back to add to the painting, it is dangerous to add paint to a thick spot - it can take all the underpaint off. If adding later in the process a light touch is best, or use a little water/oil to thin.

herzeleid
01-20-2010, 10:01 AM
Marjorie-- I too love black gesso!! However my recent experiment isn't turning out so well; my black gesso has a matte finish too it, and then the oils on top of it leave like a greasy shine :( What kind of black gesso are you using? I believe mine is a Bob Ross brand black gesso, don't know the specifics as the bottle isn't in front of me at the moment.

greywolf-art
01-20-2010, 04:00 PM
Artisan are my favourites too, I have some Holbein aqua duo's too but rarely use them as I'm not overly keen on the colours!

I only use water for clean up, if I need to thin the paint down a bit I use the artisan thinners which work much better than water, I also occasionally add a touch of artisan linseed to improve flow too (especially useful for fine detail work)

kbaxterpackwood
01-20-2010, 08:58 PM
Are the artisans good enough to be considered a professional quality paint though? Just wondering as I'm finishing up a few pieces that I'm looking to put in a local gallery. W&N Artisans are what I'm able to purchase locally.

Kimberly

hal_s
01-20-2010, 10:39 PM
Are the artisans good enough to be considered a professional quality paint though? Just wondering as I'm finishing up a few pieces that I'm looking to put in a local gallery. W&N Artisans are what I'm able to purchase locally.
Kimberly
According to W&N:


Artisan Water Mixable Oil colour is a relatively new medium in terms of art materials, however, colours containing oil and water are not new and have in fact existed since prehistoric times. For example, egg tempera is an oil in water emulsion, which has been used by artists for over 600 years.
During the development process, Artisancolours were tested for many properties that would be indicative of its durability such as adhesion, flexibility, drying, film hardness, and water resistance, as well as application properties such as mixability with water, flow, texture retention and wetting. In addition, the full range of colours were painted out on canvas directly from the tube and with mediums and/or water at different thicknesses and have been observed and tested at regular intervals since.
All results from this development stage have confirmed that Artisan does indeed act in the same way as a conventional oil colour.
To ensure the long term durability of Artisan, Winsor & Newton have and will continue to study Artisanunder various conditions using paint films that have been allowed to dry naturally for longer periods of time (test samples that have been aged artificially) and also by use of specialised equipment. The key areas to consider when assessing long term durability are:-
The evaporation of water from the paint film
Film hardness and future resistance to water & solvent
Adhesion and flexibilityIn combination with the work carried out to date and the ongoing studies, there is further analysis taking place in various conservation departments across the world.

greywolf-art
01-21-2010, 08:08 AM
Are the artisans good enough to be considered a professional quality paint though? Just wondering as I'm finishing up a few pieces that I'm looking to put in a local gallery. W&N Artisans are what I'm able to purchase locally.

Kimberly

Yes they are good enough to be entered into any gallery ect, in fact if you don't use water to thin the paint there is no difference at all.

The pigment load is possibly slightly lower than their artist quality oils, but that is only a problem if you don't find the colours bright/strong enough as they are - it doesn't affect the archival qualities of the paint!

The pigment loading issue is slightly misleading TBH, if you are an abstract painter looking for the most vivid/brilliant colours imaginable then fair enough, but for most 'realist' work this is actually a bit of a non-issue as you would very rarely use full strength pigments anyway, and as long as you can mix the colours you want then it doesn't really matter what the pigment load is.

Even student quality paint can be used to get good results if you are good at colour mixing, though I wouldn't advise using them as they are full of fillers and I don't trust their archival qualities, having said that Artisans are much closer to artist quality paints anyway so are more than good enough!

kbaxterpackwood
01-21-2010, 04:45 PM
The pigment loading issue is slightly misleading TBH, if you are an abstract painter looking for the most vivid/brilliant colours imaginable then fair enough, but for most 'realist' work this is actually a bit of a non-issue as you would very rarely use full strength pigments anyway, and as long as you can mix the colours you want then it doesn't really matter what the pigment load is.



What is TBH?

kbaxterpackwood
01-21-2010, 04:50 PM
Even student quality paint can be used to get good results if you are good at colour mixing, though I wouldn't advise using them as they are full of fillers and I don't trust their archival qualities, having said that Artisans are much closer to artist quality paints anyway so are more than good enough!

I'm using W&N Galeria's Titanium white (acrylic), comes in large tubes, for filling in the backgrounds on my really large paintings. I'm not sure what the quality of the paint is for certian but I do know that D&R acrylics rated better than the Galeria's did, according to online reviews I read. Note that when I say large paintings I"m talking about works that are 3x4 feet to 6x10 feet in size.

Finding the W&N Artisans in large quantity is an issue as I prefer to work large.

Btw I love my W&N Artisans, only the red oxide gives me fits as it's really stiff coming out of the tube.

Kimberly

Crystal1
01-21-2010, 05:32 PM
TBH=To be honest

Artisan water mixable oils are available in 200ml tubes at dickblick.com. I am just getting started with them myself. Good luck!!

kbaxterpackwood
01-21-2010, 06:55 PM
TBH=To be honest

Artisan water mixable oils are available in 200ml tubes at dickblick.com. I am just getting started with them myself. Good luck!!

Thank you for the explanation on the acronym, I'm not up on the new language.

I'll check out the 200ml tubes.

Kimberly

greywolf-art
01-22-2010, 08:39 AM
yeah some of the artisan paints can be quite stiff, what you have to bear in mind here is that this is down to the differences in the physical properties of the different pigments, some manufacturers tend to alter their formula to create more consistent stiffness (and in some cases consistent drying time too) but this means using more oil or other additives to the paint.

W&N tend to go more for keeping the paints as pure as they can (within practical limits of course) using single pigments where possible and trying to pack in as much pure pigment as is practical - which does mean that the more densley packed pigments can sometimes be a little stiff coming out of the tube.

Another side to the story is that W&N create 'studio' paints, what this means is that unlike some of the european paint makers who during the impressionist era developed paints that would be usable straight from the tube in a plein aire situation - usually by adding more oil to the mix.

W&N however made their paints as dense as possible so that in a studio you could alter the consistency to whatever you wanted - so if you needed a stiff paint you had one, if you needed something more fluid you added linseed oil ect, when people complain of paints being too stiff its because they have got too used to the watered down plein air paints and don't really understand how to use 'Studio' paints.

kbaxterpackwood
01-22-2010, 05:00 PM
yeah some of the artisan paints can be quite stiff, what you have to bear in mind here is that this is down to the differences in the physical properties of the different pigments, some manufacturers tend to alter their formula to create more consistent stiffness (and in some cases consistent drying time too) but this means using more oil or other additives to the paint.

W&N tend to go more for keeping the paints as pure as they can (within practical limits of course) using single pigments where possible and trying to pack in as much pure pigment as is practical - which does mean that the more densley packed pigments can sometimes be a little stiff coming out of the tube.

Another side to the story is that W&N create 'studio' paints, what this means is that unlike some of the european paint makers who during the impressionist era developed paints that would be usable straight from the tube in a plein aire situation - usually by adding more oil to the mix.

W&N however made their paints as dense as possible so that in a studio you could alter the consistency to whatever you wanted - so if you needed a stiff paint you had one, if you needed something more fluid you added linseed oil ect, when people complain of paints being too stiff its because they have got too used to the watered down plein air paints and don't really understand how to use 'Studio' paints.

thank you for this explanation/comparison. I now have an anwser for when my students ask about this, and they will even if they are using the Reeves student paints they will still ask the whys and wherefore of the various paint brands.

Kimberly