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halthepainter
12-01-2009, 12:25 AM
I know December is such a busy month but I hope all my oil pastel friends will try at least one of the challenges. All the images are my personal photos and you may do with them as you will.

The first image is of a temple in Bancock, Thialand. Back in the 70s I had a two day R&R in Bancock. Bancock is a city of temples. It seems every king was expected to build a temple.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Nov-2009/140488-dec_challenge_bancock_temple.jpg

I wish that there had been a couple saffron robed monks in the scene. Their robes are just a bit lighter than the tiled roof. I'm interested to see how you handle the tile texture of the roof and detail. With a dark under painting, detail could be etched into the oil pastels. (RG I can never remember the term)

The second image is of the Coast Guard Light and Fort Constitution (Previously fort William and Mary), in New Castle, NH. The colonists took the powder and shot from there and used it at the Battle of Bunker Hill.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Nov-2009/140488-dec_challenge_fort_constitution.jpg
The water was unusually calm and I did a plein air painting of this scene in soft pastels. I almost completed the painting before the tide drove me off the rocks and I took this reference photo to use to complete the painting.

The final image is of one of the fountains in Prescott Park, Portsmouth, NH.
I have painted in this park a number of times. The fountain actually has a vertical metal ring over the top of the center post to half way down it length of the supporting pipe and water flows down the inside of the ring and well as down the outside of the ring. Just explaining the photo, not expecting anyone to put in that level of detail.http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Nov-2009/140488-Dec_Challenge_Prescott.jpg

Once, while painting in the park, a woman and her Jr highschool aged son watched me paint for a while. After a bit her son said "You're the best artist in the world." I told him I wished I could have him as a juror for all the juried shows I enter.

I included subjects that I like. My mentor of a number of years often chided me for painting picture post cards. I like picture post cards and they sell.

kazuki
12-01-2009, 02:08 AM
Lovely photos, Hal. :clap:

Have a great month ahead!

Pat Isaac
12-01-2009, 08:32 AM
Thanks for hosting, Hal. Great pictures.

Pat

SammyH
12-02-2009, 08:39 AM
Hal,
These are really lovely reference photos. I like all of them but especially the lighthouse.
December may be a slow month for painting challenges but I hope I'm wrong. I teach my class tomorrow morning and am always ready by Sunday afternoon but this week haven't even read over the material yet. I'm in charge of a big show that opens on Jan. 9th and am bogged down with details like the press release, newsletter, hiring a judge, etc. I had one of my co-chairs resign and must get a replacement.
Good luck with the challenges. I'll be watching to see how you handle them.

halthepainter
12-02-2009, 10:18 AM
Hal,
These are really lovely reference photos. I like all of them but especially the lighthouse.
December may be a slow month for painting challenges but I hope I'm wrong. I teach my class tomorrow morning and am always ready by Sunday afternoon but this week haven't even read over the material yet. I'm in charge of a big show that opens on Jan. 9th and am bogged down with details like the press release, newsletter, hiring a judge, etc. I had one of my co-chairs resign and must get a replacement.
Good luck with the challenges. I'll be watching to see how you handle them.

Hi Sammy, I feel for you. It's tough being the responsible adult in an organization. It always falls on the backs of one or two people to do all the work. I was President of a large art association and coop gallery until I burned out. Don't take on too much and burn out yourself. :heart: :thumbsup:

It was actually enlightening to walk around with the judges while they made their judgements. It was enlightening to say the least and also disappointing. So everyone out there don't be too disappointed if you aren't judged favorably by a gallery or for an art show. It is a flawed process fueled by the personal prejudices of a particular judge.

Pat Isaac
12-02-2009, 10:22 AM
That is definitely true about judges, Hal. Art is very subjective so some personal opinions are bound to come into play. Another set of judges could pick an entirely different show, but it is an enlightening experience.

Pat

oldrockchick
12-02-2009, 12:18 PM
I will try to find time to do one. I may even print one out to take to Dagenham with me.

truck driver
12-02-2009, 07:07 PM
sgraffito - scratching out.

your welcome hal, though I am quite surprised Bill didnt beat me to this one!

RG

halthepainter
12-02-2009, 07:11 PM
sgraffito - scratching out.

your welcome hal, though I am quite surprised Bill didnt beat me to this one!

RG

Thank you RG, Bill hasn't been around much lately.

For some reason I always draw a total blank when it comes to remembering that term.

VladK
12-02-2009, 11:40 PM
Hal, first of all, thank you for the nice pictures, really challenging. As December's gonna be busy, anyway, I started underpaintings, and definitely will find some time to finish them up.
I just primed them with Colourfix.

Your lighthouse is amazing but i needed to sacrifice the stone wall, which could be also a great subject to paint;)
The sunny fountain is also interesting and promises to be colorful:rolleyes:
I'm still deciding of what to crop from the temple photo:evil:

Oh, the paper is 9x12 140lb wc paper. Watercolors i bought cheap in Utrecht art supplies.

kazuki
12-03-2009, 04:17 AM
Here's my first entry for this month. I started with pentels in non-stretched, un-primed canvas. Have to mention that pentels worked decently in canvas with solvent. Unfortunately, using solvent regularly is not an option for me. So I went out yesterday and bought wow, oh wow 33 colors of Senns to make up my wonderful personalized 47 color Senns set. http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/03-Dec-2009/109571-Dec09_066_Small.jpg

Here's the my light house.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/03-Dec-2009/109571-Dec09_068_Medium.jpg

I'm satisfied with the overall effect, except for the top of the light house where I couldn't bring much details. Also, I struggle to keep straight lines straight.

Just noticed that my bridge seems remote. Will correct it tomorrow and post again.

seejay
12-03-2009, 06:16 AM
Hal, good photos. Thanks.

Vlad and Sue, good to see some good progress early in the month.

Pat Isaac
12-03-2009, 07:54 AM
Nicely done, Sue and look at those luscious Senns.
Great start Vlad.

Pat

SammyH
12-03-2009, 08:26 AM
There are some fantastic beginnings here.
Vlad, you are skilled with watercolor and I am impressed by both of your underpaintings.
Sue, love your OPs on canvas. Nice reflections in the water.
Good starts for both of you. Looking forward to future posts as they develop.

halthepainter
12-03-2009, 11:17 AM
Hal, first of all, thank you for the nice pictures, really challenging. As December's gonna be busy, anyway, I started underpaintings, and definitely will find some time to finish them up.
I just primed them with Colourfix.

Your lighthouse is amazing but i needed to sacrifice the stone wall, which could be also a great subject to paint;)
The sunny fountain is also interesting and promises to be colorful:rolleyes:
I'm still deciding of what to crop from the temple photo:evil:

Oh, the paper is 9x12 140lb wc paper. Watercolors i bought cheap in Utrecht art supplies.

Vlad you're off to a wonderful start. Cheap watercolors are just fine for the underpainting.

I will probably leave the lighthouse centered (not a desirable composition) but I love the lighthouse and the textured wall so much I can't bear to crop them.

The arc of the fountain is actually a full circle with water flowing down the inside of the arc. I'm attaching a copy of a painting I did last summer of the fountain. My excuse for the poor painting is that it was plein air and a wedding party took over the garden. They didn't force me out but I was terribly distracted by all the milling about and rushed the painting.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/03-Dec-2009/140488-lores_fountain.jpg

As far as croping the temple, I can't decide if I want to crop it and feature the statuary or keep the full photo and put three monks over by the columns as the center of interest.

Anyway you're off to a great start.

halthepainter
12-03-2009, 11:22 AM
Sue that is a wonderful painting. I love the ripples you put in your water. Is that a linen canvas?

Congratulations of the Senns. I love them. Now I wish I hadn't spent all the money on large sets of Erengi and Gray Pas and just purchased only Senns.

It really is a wonderful job Sue.

halthepainter
12-03-2009, 01:01 PM
I suspect quite a few of you don't participate in the weekly "Oil Gusher" and I just wanted to mention in this thread that I posted photos of Bancock Temples and water markets in our "travel Photo" sticky thread that perhaps some of you might find interesting. I also posted some of my aviation photos there. Some of the temples are quite spectacular.

truck driver
12-03-2009, 02:24 PM
Hal, first of all, thank you for the nice pictures, really challenging. As December's gonna be busy, anyway, I started underpaintings, and definitely will find some time to finish them up.
I just primed them with Colourfix.

Your lighthouse is amazing but i needed to sacrifice the stone wall, which could be also a great subject to paint;)
The sunny fountain is also interesting and promises to be colorful:rolleyes:
I'm still deciding of what to crop from the temple photo:evil:

Oh, the paper is 9x12 140lb wc paper. Watercolors i bought cheap in Utrecht art supplies.


Brand of watercolour or cheap vs, expensive is not a factor for using as an underpainting. Expecially with a coulourfix primer over them. my reasoning is this, Watercolor doesnt form a paint film, the binder provides just enough to stick the pigment to the surface of the substrate, then when you coat it with colorfix theres plenty of substrate left between the pigment particles for the colourfix to bind to. So no issues, with cheap watercolor, though I dont own any. Holbein, Grahams, and Daniel Smith are my wc choices. We do have somwhere some winsor newton artist watercolours as well. I think my dear wife has those hidden somewhere. BTW the utrecht brands of watercolours, and oil paints sare actually pretty good.
RG

robertsloan2
12-03-2009, 06:49 PM
Hal, thank you for hosting and providing such great photos. I can't even decide which of these I want to do -- December is going to be a very busy month for me, I can see that. For some reason I keep seeing weird crops of the lighthouse one, picking out areas of it to refine as their own paintings, like part of the foreground with the lighthouse only in it as a reflection.

Great watercolors, Vlad! Full of color and life.

Sue, congratulations on your 33 new Senneliers and wow for what you did with them. The lighthouse scene is gorgeous. You got those foreground ripples that fascinated me looking at the photo so well.

Hal, your painting of the fountain is so colorful and lively. I like that, maybe rushing it forced you to keep it bright and vivid. It looks so good.

I hope I can make time to do one of these this month. It's going to be pretty tough, December has a lot stacked up in it and I'm hosting a Pastel Strokes in the Pastel Forum so I've got to participate there and do something with softies -- but maybe I can sneak back here long enough to do at least one of these. They are all so cool!

GOSH
12-03-2009, 07:11 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/03-Dec-2009/143278-S7301013.jpg

Hello everyone!

Here is my take on the lighthouse. :wave:
Watercolor strathmore 6x18", liquitex primer, linseed oil, little brush, Senneliers sap green and 205, and a pencil.
Hubby surprised I used pencil.

halthepainter
12-03-2009, 07:27 PM
Nicely done Gosh, the landscape format paper makes for an interesting composition.

SammyH
12-03-2009, 08:12 PM
Hal, wonderful, bright, impressionistic fountain. Very nice job.
GOSH, love the monochromatic lighthouse. The wispy clouds and reflections in the water are so loose and painterly.

VladK
12-04-2009, 12:38 AM
Sammy, thanks, I learnt to paint with watercolor only, we had no other choice those days:lol:
Sue, what a wonderful thing you have done:clap: What I would fix is the bridge (kissing the horizon) and the value of the closer wall (darken). I still remember(after so many years) how my drawing teacher taught to determine value: look through your hand as if through a spyglass and you'll clearly see dark and light areas...

Thanks RG for sharing the knowledge. I love watercolor but it lacks expression and boldness in my opinion. And I agree with you that in this case it's just an underpainting, which will be covered with primer, and then I'll eventually go over this with layers of OPs...

Robert, thank you.

And, Gosh, your work is very beautiful :music:

VladK
12-04-2009, 12:48 AM
Hal, I had no choice with lighthouse, otherwise I would end up with loooong miniature on 9x12. But wall is so challenging..., I still regret :D
Thanks for your tip on fountain, your work is very lively and energetic:thumbsup:

About temple: I even had an idea to make it in moonlight with ninjas:eek:
still deciding...

Meanwhile, here is my first layer on top of watercolors, I locked up in color masses and some values. I decided to take my time and do it in no hurry.

halthepainter
12-04-2009, 09:00 AM
Vlad your pathway leading into the fountain is a neat touch.

Ninjas??? Uhmmmmmmmmmmmmmm??????????:rolleyes:

Pat Isaac
12-04-2009, 03:34 PM
Looking good, Vlad.

Pat

VladK
12-04-2009, 03:58 PM
Thanks Pat, will do my best:cat:

VladK
12-05-2009, 12:31 AM
Here is my update.

Pat Isaac
12-05-2009, 07:35 AM
Wow this is lovely, Vlad. Good color and a nice cheerful feel.

Pat

halthepainter
12-05-2009, 08:50 AM
Wow Vlad, looks great. Good job.

Vlad this is not a criticism but just a style idea. The leaves of the overhanging trees are quite busy and a bit distracting from your gorgeous fountain. As a style alternative, I wonder if the leaves might be massed in color with the leaves suggested as variations of texture and just a few leaves actually defined.

Just an idea??

marionh
12-06-2009, 10:01 AM
Here is my WIP on the lighthouse. I cropped the image to give me a 30x40cm view. On Fisher sanded paper.
Stage 1 - watercolour underpainting using warm colours for light and cool colours for darks.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Dec-2009/42113-lighthouse_crop_stage_1_800x600.jpg
Stage 2 - getting it to look right. Raised the horizon line slightly and so had to change the perspective of the wall.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Dec-2009/42113-lighthouse_crop_stage_2_800x600.jpg
Stage 2.5 - half way to stage 3 where each 'block' is split into 3 or 4 smaller blocks following the colour shifts. Change the wall because I noticed the step in it. Hope that I can get the reworking to disappear, but the tooth of the paper seems to be filling up.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Dec-2009/42113-lighthouse_crop_stage_2.5_800x600.jpg

Question, should I raise the height of the light house a little more than I have done? I am unsure if it now looks in proportion and would like to know what you think.

halthepainter
12-06-2009, 10:53 AM
Marion your process is quite exciting. I know several artists who do the underpainging in bright complementary colors. It is coming along beautifully and I think the current height of the lighthouse will work.

Pat Isaac
12-06-2009, 11:59 AM
This is looking very nice and thanks for showing us your process..

Pat

SammyH
12-06-2009, 02:07 PM
Vlad, love your colorful, impressionistic garden fountain painting.
Marion, your lighthouse painting is looking good already. Great colors and looseness.

VladK
12-06-2009, 07:19 PM
Thank you Pat and Sammy for encouragement:)
And Hal, thank you for support.

Hal, I realized, when I looked the next day, there was a negative gap above the fountain, and I made branches longer, so they hang close to fountain, shifting interest to it.
Also, I added more sun throughout to make it more lively (in my opinion at least;) )

And here is my final version

VladK
12-06-2009, 07:22 PM
Marion, great start, beautiful colors:thumbsup:

Pat Isaac
12-06-2009, 07:25 PM
Nicely done, Vlad.....:thumbsup:

Pat

SammyH
12-06-2009, 07:46 PM
Very nice, Vlad. I like the addition of sunlight especially on the tree trunk where you added more darks and lights. It looks more 3D now. I also like the variety of greens in the foliage above the fountain.

VladK
12-07-2009, 02:35 PM
Thank you Pat and Sammy :)

I just realized the quality of my last photo taken is poor, it's bluish and cold, while the original is much warmer and colorful. I took it outside, but not in the direct sunlight. Most probably, siding has reflected that bluish tone, as I laid it on a chair by the wall...

I usually do it under the different lamps with no flash.

What whould you suggest when taking a photos from pictures to preserve original colors? Does anybody use flash? Any special lightbulbs?

Thank you for suggestions.

halthepainter
12-07-2009, 03:24 PM
Vlad I take my photos in one of two ways.

I will take it outside in indirect light. If the painting is small, I lay it on the ground between my feet and take a photo looking down vertically. I am able to hold my digital camera very steady this way and can keep the painting well framed in the camera so I don't get a sloping side or an image shape other than a rectangle.

A larger painting I will put on one of my plein air easels and take a photo that way. I never use flash, it washes out colors as does direct sunlight.
I have also photographed my paintings in my studio using an Ott light when the day is gray and dull.

I will brace myself to get a steady platform (I have a camera tripod but I find it a bit of a pain. Even with a tripod, It can still be hard to get the image perfectly framed.) I will take multiple images really trying hard to make sure I can get an even sided image. I don't want any trapezoids. One of my photoshop programs can correct for an uneven side but that program has bombed on me.

I also take some photos in close and some stepped back just a bit. I then sort for best focus, and best framed photo to choose for the one or two I save and publish.

I'm sure some of our good photographers here will cringe at my techniques but they work for me. I try to work on the KISS principle. (Keep It Simple Stupid)

The KISS principle is also why I don't worry about the properties of pigments and trust the manufacturer as to archival properties. That is also why I like limited palettes and often try the palettes of the old masters or of prominent modern painters who use limited palettes.

Sorry to digress Vlad, that is more an arguement for oils and acrylics.

VladK
12-07-2009, 04:07 PM
Thank you Hal, this is, perhaps, a solution, indirect sunlight w/o reflections, etc., or OTT light.

Basically, I take the pictures the same way as you do (most natural way) although, agree, professionals may smile;)

My problem was i took it under different lighting. Thanks again.:)

kazuki
12-08-2009, 06:14 AM
Thanks everyone for your kind words to me. :D

Beautiful work on your fountain painting, Vlad. Thanks for the WIP.

Thanks for the closeup of the fountain, Hal. It will surely help. I just can't decide if I should do the fountain first or the Thai temple. :confused:

What a beautiful interpretation, Gosh. Love the crop. Love that watercolor block... Wish I had one :envy:

Marion, exciting to see your WIP. Can't wait to see more updates.

Here's my final version. If you don't see much difference from the previous version, don't worry, I don't see much either :wink2:
I did go through the bridge with color pencils (I don't have oil pencils yet, so I used non-artist-quality colored pencils).

C&C welcome.

marionh
12-08-2009, 08:26 AM
Thank you all for your great support.
Here is an update - still a way to go but any comments and suggestions welcome.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Dec-2009/42113-002_800x600.JPG

marionh
12-08-2009, 08:33 AM
Hal like your crop and your treatment of the fountain.
Vlad, love your garden. I particularly like the greenery at the bottom left.
Sue - I can't see your image.

Pat Isaac
12-08-2009, 08:46 AM
This is looking wonderful Marion. Love the color.
Pat

halthepainter
12-08-2009, 08:50 AM
Very nice Marion. Wonderfully bright cheerful painting.

halthepainter
12-08-2009, 08:52 AM
Kazuki, your final image didn't come through?????:confused:

truck driver
12-08-2009, 02:54 PM
Vlad I take my photos in one of two ways.

I will take it outside in indirect light. If the painting is small, I lay it on the ground between my feet and take a photo looking down vertically. I am able to hold my digital camera very steady this way and can keep the painting well framed in the camera so I don't get a sloping side or an image shape other than a rectangle.

A larger painting I will put on one of my plein air easels and take a photo that way. I never use flash, it washes out colors as does direct sunlight.
I have also photographed my paintings in my studio using an Ott light when the day is gray and dull.

I will brace myself to get a steady platform (I have a camera tripod but I find it a bit of a pain. Even with a tripod, It can still be hard to get the image perfectly framed.) I will take multiple images really trying hard to make sure I can get an even sided image. I don't want any trapezoids. One of my photoshop programs can correct for an uneven side but that program has bombed on me.

I also take some photos in close and some stepped back just a bit. I then sort for best focus, and best framed photo to choose for the one or two I save and publish.

I'm sure some of our good photographers here will cringe at my techniques but they work for me. I try to work on the KISS principle. (Keep It Simple Stupid)

The KISS principle is also why I don't worry about the properties of pigments and trust the manufacturer as to archival properties. That is also why I like limited palettes and often try the palettes of the old masters or of prominent modern painters who use limited palettes.

Sorry to digress Vlad, that is more an arguement for oils and acrylics.
TRUST THE MANUFACTURE ...... You gotta be kidding me right?

RG

halthepainter
12-08-2009, 03:39 PM
TRUST THE MANUFACTURE ...... You gotta be kidding me right?

RG

RG, I would much prefer to be painting than researching paints, Ops, mediums, surfaces etc. :D

I try to purchase good quality, hopefully archival materials, which is probably silly because I fully expect my family to dump my unsold paintings in the trash can once I'm gone. :rolleyes:

I'll keep watching you, Bill and Robert to keep me advised should a problem arise with any of the materials I use. :thumbsup:

hollyga
12-08-2009, 06:51 PM
Marion - Love the light house! And, hopefully, I will remember what I have learned from seeing your work in progress here when I start working on my next painting. This is a really tough time of year for us post office worker-bees, so I won't be participating this month. That's a long time to remember stuff! Thanks for sharing your process!

Holly

VladK
12-08-2009, 10:09 PM
Marion, what I can say is WOW, so airy and bright:thumbsup:
Sue, your image did not upload for some reason

kazuki
12-09-2009, 03:23 AM
Here's my final version. If you don't see much difference from the previous version, don't worry, I don't see much either :wink2:
I did go through the bridge with color pencils (I don't have oil pencils yet, so I used non-artist-quality colored pencils).

C&C welcome.

Sorry.

Hope it uploads this time!
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Dec-2009/109571-Dec09_076_Small.jpg

kazuki
12-09-2009, 03:25 AM
Is that a linen canvas?




Hal, I'm not really sure. I'll check with them when I go to the store next time...

truck driver
12-09-2009, 03:51 AM
Sorry.

Hope it uploads this time!
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Dec-2009/109571-Dec09_076_Small.jpg

Looks great sue, I cant remember if you said but that looks like portrait linen you painted that on. How did that surface work for you?

RG

kazuki
12-09-2009, 04:08 AM
Looks great sue, I cant remember if you said but that looks like portrait linen you painted that on. How did that surface work for you?

RG


This surface worked great. For the first time in OPs, I found some surface-OP combo without any issues. It's thinned pentels underpainting and the top surface is fully senns.

halthepainter
12-09-2009, 08:50 AM
Sue, I think your painting works very well. Your bridge works well. Great job.

Your canvas surface worked very well for this painting.

truck driver
12-09-2009, 02:14 PM
Thats not canvas, thats linen..

RG

halthepainter
12-09-2009, 02:20 PM
Thats not canvas, thats linen..

RG

I stand corrected. :wink2:

truck driver
12-09-2009, 09:37 PM
I stand corrected. :wink2:

of couse i'm just going by the texture, and color and weave of this material..
I Could be wrong.. perhaps.. maybe.... prlly not though...

RG

halthepainter
12-09-2009, 10:56 PM
of couse i'm just going by the texture, and color and weave of this material..
I Could be wrong.. perhaps.. maybe.... prlly not though...

RG

Back in post 16, I asked Sue if her surface were linen but she never responded. Yeah it looks like linen to me.

I guess I should have been more precise with my comment in post #56.

VladK
12-10-2009, 12:36 AM
Great job Sue:thumbsup:

Here is my final version.

kazuki
12-10-2009, 01:29 AM
Back in post 16, I asked Sue if her surface were linen but she never responded. Yeah it looks like linen to me.

I guess I should have been more precise with my comment in post #56.


I'm sorry I missed your question, Hal. But pls notice that I did respond to that question in post number 53. :-)

kazuki
12-10-2009, 01:32 AM
Great job Sue:thumbsup:

Here is my final version.


Thanks, Vlad.

Wow, what a great work on the light house. :clap:

kazuki
12-10-2009, 01:38 AM
I stand corrected. :wink2:


And I'm confused :confused: LOL.

But I did mention in my first post that it was a canvas. I don't really know the difference between canvas and linen. But if some more info might help, it's actually white primed on the other side. Because of the color, I prefer working on this unprimed side. It works for me though.

So you guys agree that it's linen and it should not be called canvas?

RG, did you mention it is portrait linen? So it means it would work well for portraits?

SammyH
12-10-2009, 05:49 AM
Hal, it looks like I was wrong about the lack of activity in this busy month. Your lighthouse seems to be drawing a lot of attention.

Marion, gorgeous colors and nice movement in the sky. Very pretty.

Sue, Good job. I like the linen texture.

Vlad, this is well done. Nice sky and movement in the water.

Shirl Parker
12-10-2009, 10:14 AM
Sue, for clarification,

"canvas |ˈkanvəs|
noun
a strong, coarse unbleached cloth made from hemp, flax, cotton, or a similar yarn, used to make items such as sails and tents and as a surface for oil painting "

Linen would fall under the category "similar yarn". It is a finer texture, and generally more expensive.

truck driver
12-10-2009, 02:54 PM
Portrait linen, is linen with a very fine weave.

Linen, is a material that is produced from fibers made from flax. These fibers are very long, the longest of any used for art materials. This results in a lightweight strong material. This stuff is awesome. I would still suggest a coat of rsg, and oil ground. However even without flax is much more resistant to oil, than canvas - which is mostly made from cotten.



true portrait linen is amongst the costly material one can find to paint on, however its texture more than makes up for its cost. A well prepared piece of portrait linen canvas on board, with real chalk gesso, (albo) is as smooth as glass.

RG

VladK
12-11-2009, 08:58 AM
Thank you Sammy and Sue. I might be missing something as I worked on it late night. Thanks to Hal, I've got a full spectrum lamp and it's completely different experience.

halthepainter
12-11-2009, 09:19 AM
Vlad your final version is beautiful, great colors, great ripples.

Glad you like your new lighting.

I once painted a boat for a corporation. It was their boat that took people to an island recreation area. I did the painting in normal household lighting. When I went to deliver it, I was appalled at the difference in the look of the painting. I wound up having to tweak the painting prior to delivery.

Just to be fair and balanced, I attended a demo where an artist painted with a 60 watt bulb attached to her easel as her only light. She said that since the painting would hang in normal household light, that that was the light she used for the painting. Her painting was lovely but I wondered how it would look in a gallery with florescent lighting.

Pat Isaac
12-11-2009, 09:19 AM
Somehow, I missed this. Excellent work, Vlad and I like your use of color...

Pat

VladK
12-11-2009, 10:28 AM
Thanks Pat and Hal:)

Pat, I try to use as much clean colors as I can(although sometimes i overdo;) ), and this challenge gives me an opportunity to experiment a little. Thanks for encouragement:music:

Hal, I agree with you, because when any work executed well it will be presented at least the same. And in your example, when artist tries to execute her work in non-adequate lighting, it will transcend to the presentation level.

truck driver
12-12-2009, 07:42 PM
Vlad,

I like your work on this one a lot, I love the clouds the depth and the overall impression you have managed to create. Great work

RG

truck driver
12-13-2009, 12:13 AM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/12-Dec-2009/136518-dec-chal-pencil.jpg

Well, I got started working on the challenge.. started in pencil.. now I think I'm gonna have to do it in graphite, before I can do it in op.

RG

marionh
12-13-2009, 02:15 AM
Sue, nice painting, love the sky and you've achieved the open desolate look of many sea scenes.

Vlad, Nice sky as well and you've achieved a good colour harmony.

RG, this looks like a good start. Do the OPs cover the pencil and graphite marks or do they feature in the final work? Asking as I am finding some of the OPs surprisingly transparent, I had thought they would be more opaque.

truck driver
12-13-2009, 02:45 AM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/12-Dec-2009/136518-dec-chal-pen2.jpg

Hal here is your dec challenge, If I get a chance I'll do another one maybe even in oil pastels this time..

RG

truck driver
12-13-2009, 02:49 AM
Sue, nice painting, love the sky and you've achieved the open desolate look of many sea scenes.

Vlad, Nice sky as well and you've achieved a good colour harmony.

RG, this looks like a good start. Do the OPs cover the pencil and graphite marks or do they feature in the final work? Asking as I am finding some of the OPs surprisingly transparent, I had thought they would be more opaque.

that depends on the effect you are after. I would reccomend to those who do there initial drawing with pencil to cover the drawing with goldens, pastel grounds, or Golden fine pumice grounds. To isolate the pencil from the op. Otherwise the pencil and op will mix together. You can use graphite to enhance ops, expeccially when your looking for truly dark or even shiny metallic surfaces. My intention was to draw something and then do the op over it. However I got carried away, and did the entire thing in graphite. I will quite probably start over, and draw it again this time without all the shading..

Just wanted to let Hal know I wasnt ignoring his challenge.

RG

halthepainter
12-13-2009, 10:37 AM
Aha, do I detect gridding in post #73 ???:eek:

Just kidding RG, I often grid myself. I'll post my WIP in a bit and I used proportional dividers to try to get the proportions about right. One of my problems, when I start smearing my OPs around, I tend to have some of my objects grow because, I can't seem to contain them within their original shapes.

Your drawing is just beautiful RG. Very well done.

A monochromatic treatment of that subject would also be very exciting.

Pat Isaac
12-13-2009, 10:41 AM
That is a lovely drawing, RG.
Yes, Marion many of the OPs are trasparent, especially some yellows and greens.

Pat

halthepainter
12-13-2009, 12:00 PM
I'm just posting this WIP to let everyone know I'm working on my own challenge. It's so preliminary, no comments please.

Since there was no green in the painting, I decided to experiment with the Zorn Palette again (red, yellow, black and white).

I found it interesting that when putting my sky in with white and just a smidge of black, it didn't read as blue to me but as just a dead white. I then added some creamy clouds of white, red and yellow and eureka the sky turned blue.

I'm working on a black gessoed (with marble dust) archival canvas panel to which I just used opaque white water colors to locate some of the elements.

Like my Japanese Lantern in last month's challenge, I'm only using white, black, red, and yellow Senns, mixing on a paper palette pad, scraping my mixutre off the pad with a palette knife and applying with a color shaper.

I know it's silly but I'm having fun.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Dec-2009/140488-wip_dec_challenge_temple.jpg

Pat Isaac
12-13-2009, 01:23 PM
Looking forward to the finish, Hal.

Pat

truck driver
12-13-2009, 06:36 PM
Yes you do Hal, You also detect the tape around the edge with inch 1/4 and 1/2 marks on all sides. Theres also another mark on the edge for the horizons, and the ground plane. other marks locating the center. And somewhere else on the edge is a 20 step value scale hand drawn in..
However note theres no line on it that I didnt draw..

RG

halthepainter
12-13-2009, 07:02 PM
Just teasing a bit RG, as I said it's a beautiful drawing.

I often grid myself but in this WIP, I used proportional dividers to locate my prespective lines on the edges of my painting rather than create a grid.

You're one up on me, is the tape drawn yourself or is it something purchased? If purchased what's the source?

truck driver
12-13-2009, 09:26 PM
Just teasing a bit RG, as I said it's a beautiful drawing.

I often grid myself but in this WIP, I used proportional dividers to locate my prespective lines on the edges of my painting rather than create a grid.

You're one up on me, is the tape drawn yourself or is it something purchased? If purchased what's the source?

I do the tape myself. Draw all my little aids, if its a colour painting, i will put marks of the ops i'm using on the tape along with the number of what it is.
Just kind of a method of working that works for me. I dont always use a grid. But I do the measuring thing on the tape, just for a reference even when I'm not using a photo. Helps me keep track of size relationships. I also have trouble drawing in my perspetive boxes at times, I keep working on it though. :) If you are working from a digital image you can also enable the rulers in the image program your working on, and if you are having trouble figuring out size relationships measure with your mouse. The other thing I do with digital images is adjust the size of the image to match. then I will place the laptop back away from the drawing/painting so whats on the screen is the same size as the image I'm working on, and use that to draw, and shade from.

Hope this at least gives some insight into how I do things, for those that care.

RG

RG

truck driver
12-13-2009, 09:51 PM
all that aside theres probably close to 30/40 hours in that "drawing" you cant see the details from the pictures, but every tile on the roof is drawn....

RG

kazuki
12-13-2009, 10:05 PM
Thanks Sammy and Marion for the kind words.

Vlad, your final version is very good. Love all the details in it.

Beautiful work on the Thai temple, RG.
I was about to ask the question Marion had asked, about pencil underwork and OPs and top. Anyway, I got the answer. I so wish that I do my portrait undersketch in pencil/charcoal which can also serve as a value painting. But I would need to buy pumice gel first. Thanks a lot for the info.

Nice one, Hal. Waiting to see the results.

kazuki
12-13-2009, 10:06 PM
Thanks, Shirl and RG for the info on the linen. I transferred one of my portrait sketches to the linen by rubbing white OP on the behind but the result was not very good. The texture of the linen prevented the drawing from being transferred accurately. I got stuck at that point! Any help will do. Thanks.

truck driver
12-13-2009, 10:27 PM
Thanks, Shirl and RG for the info on the linen. I transferred one of my portrait sketches to the linen by rubbing white OP on the behind but the result was not very good. The texture of the linen prevented the drawing from being transferred accurately. I got stuck at that point! Any help will do. Thanks.

heres a couple of methods that you can use to transfer acurately a drawing to linen. Instead of using op use white dry pastel it will transfer cleaner.

or you can poke holes in your drawing with a pin, and get a small bag made of linen filled with charcoal, and pat it along the front side of your drawing.
this is called pouncing, it is a very, very old transfer technique.

One more this is the one I use, take a sheet of paper, and on one side cover it completely and thickly with a 9b graphite stick. Use this paper as you would carbon paper.

Hopefully this gives you some ideas.

RG

halthepainter
12-13-2009, 11:45 PM
I do the tape myself. Draw all my little aids, if its a colour painting, i will put marks of the ops i'm using on the tape along with the number of what it is.
Just kind of a method of working that works for me. I dont always use a grid. But I do the measuring thing on the tape, just for a reference even when I'm not using a photo. Helps me keep track of size relationships. I also have trouble drawing in my perspetive boxes at times, I keep working on it though. :) If you are working from a digital image you can also enable the rulers in the image program your working on, and if you are having trouble figuring out size relationships measure with your mouse. The other thing I do with digital images is adjust the size of the image to match. then I will place the laptop back away from the drawing/painting so whats on the screen is the same size as the image I'm working on, and use that to draw, and shade from.

Hope this at least gives some insight into how I do things, for those that care.

RG

RG

Thank you RG, I'm just a casual photo shop user. I need to pump up my photoshop skills.

robertsloan2
12-14-2009, 02:57 AM
Vlad, your lighthouse is gorgeous! I love the finish. That's so rich and colorful, so true and bright and cheery in the sunlight. Wonderful painting.

RG, that is a splendid, spot on preliminary drawing for your temple. It's going to rock. I agree with Hal, you probably ought to go over it with clear gesso with pumice or clear Colourfix primer or something like that where it'll have an acrylic barrier between the drawing and the oil pastels. Gorgeous values and I can see the advantage of painting right over a full value drawing like that.

Grid method's perfectly accurate and fair, it's been used for centuries and still is part of meticulous craft. I love seeing people take the time to do it. I am just not one of them because I'm too used to freehand sketching. So I will occasionally give a cat a crooked nose or something because I was lazy.

Hal, wow! Your very limited palette works so well! That's gorgeous blue created by its complements and shading up from black. I think most black is actually more blue cast than pure neutral anyway. Though mixing it with yellow usually does also give some olive greens so even if it had any greens you could've gotten away with that palette.

The experiment's working, big time!

kazuki
12-14-2009, 05:26 AM
all that aside theres probably close to 30/40 hours in that "drawing" you cant see the details from the pictures, but every tile on the roof is drawn....

RG


I did notice there are lots of details in your drawing. Great work! :clap:

kazuki
12-14-2009, 05:29 AM
heres a couple of methods that you can use to transfer acurately a drawing to linen. Instead of using op use white dry pastel it will transfer cleaner.

or you can poke holes in your drawing with a pin, and get a small bag made of linen filled with charcoal, and pat it along the front side of your drawing.
this is called pouncing, it is a very, very old transfer technique.

One more this is the one I use, take a sheet of paper, and on one side cover it completely and thickly with a 9b graphite stick. Use this paper as you would carbon paper.

Hopefully this gives you some ideas.

RG

Thanks you, RG. Using a dry pastel instead of OP sounds like an easier option for me.
By the way, if I use graphite stick, would I be able to carry on with the OPs without using pumice gel over the under drawing?

marionh
12-14-2009, 05:47 AM
RG thanks for taking the time to explain. Your drawing is good, I particularly like the roof. You certainly have more patience than me.

Hal, good so far. Interested in your technique and the result of using that limited palette. You may have noticed that I love to use lots of colour.

halthepainter
12-14-2009, 09:39 AM
RG thanks for taking the time to explain. Your drawing is good, I particularly like the roof. You certainly have more patience than me.

Hal, good so far. Interested in your technique and the result of using that limited palette. You may have noticed that I love to use lots of colour.

Yes RG, wonderful work. I, like Robert haven't the patience to work that meticulously and often tend to work a little loosely.

Marion, I'm a great fan of limited palettes. The Sennenliers lend themselves of mixing on a paper palette pad without solvents.
My favorite living oil painter, John Stobart used five pigments and white, George Cherepov's limited palette was three colors and white. I've seen wonderful watercolour paintings done with only magenta, cyan, and yellow.
My Anders Zorn palette is only two colors, if you don't consider black a color.

I attended a demo, and had a small private chuckle when the artist displayed his palette. He laid out his twelve colors and seriously referred to his palette as his limited palette.

Robert thank you for your kind comments.

truck driver
12-14-2009, 03:32 PM
Kazuki, as long as your lines are light, you wont have the issues with graphite getting into the ops, and dirtying the colour, the problem comes into play when you start with a full value drawing such as the one I did.

RG

truck driver
12-14-2009, 03:39 PM
Also I dont always go to the extremes I did with this one, this image is deceptively tricky, which is why I used the methods that I did to render it. 80% of the time Its a quick freehand sketch. In particular my wife and I have had several discussions on where the vp is actually located, where the viewer is at, the angles for the bulding, and the angles of the marble base. With this image perspective is everything. I do believe that because of the method I chose, that I actually have some understanding of this image. So the time is worth it. However not even I am enough of a sadistic masochist, to draw in that fashion, for everything. However even with the free hand sketches I still do the rulers on the outside.

its so usefull to draw on the tape, and have a record of what ops you used.

RG

truck driver
12-14-2009, 03:45 PM
Kazuki - heres one more tip. When you do a graphite, charcoal underdrawing you need to lighten it to keep the loose graphite, and or charcoal particles from blending with the op. That is if your not using a hard surface barrier such as clear colourfix, or goldens acrylic pumice gel, or pastel ground.

The easiest way I know of to do this involves the sticky tack that is sold to hang posters on the wall, flatten it out and roll it across the image. It will lighten everything and leave the texture in place.

RG

halthepainter
12-14-2009, 03:48 PM
its so usefull to draw on the tape, and have a record of what ops you used.

RG

I also found this to be a meticulous subject, not one lending inself to casual sketching. I had prespective lines going all over the place then losing them as I applied my OPs.

I didn't have to worry about keeping track of the OPs I used since I only used four of them. :lol: :lol: :lol:

truck driver
12-14-2009, 03:52 PM
Thanks hal, Robert, Kazuki, marionh, pat, and anybody else I have missed for the comments on the drawing. I'm still uncertain on if I just want to leave this drawing alone, and do another one to paint on, or paint on this one.

RG

halthepainter
12-14-2009, 03:53 PM
Kazuki - heres one more tip. When you do a graphite, charcoal underdrawing you need to lighten it to keep the loose graphite, and or charcoal particles from blending with the op. That is if your not using a hard surface barrier such as clear colourfix, or goldens acrylic pumice gel, or pastel ground.

The easiest way I know of to do this involves the sticky tack that is sold to hang posters on the wall, flatten it out and roll it across the image. It will lighten everything and leave the texture in place.

RG

I would also think a spray fixative would work at least on a charcoal drawing. I would sometime use fixative between layers of soft pastels when I needed more tooth or didn't want the lower layers of colors interferring with the top layers. I've never tired fixative on graphite and have on idea how it would work on that.

halthepainter
12-14-2009, 03:55 PM
Thanks hal, Robert, Kazuki, marionh, pat, and anybody else I have missed for the comments on the drawing. I'm still uncertain on if I just want to leave this drawing alone, and do another one to paint on, or paint on this one.

RG

Robert it's such a nice drawing I would tend to want to keep it myself.

truck driver
12-14-2009, 03:57 PM
I would also think a spray fixative would work at least on a charcoal drawing. I would sometime use fixative between layers of soft pastels when I needed more tooth or didn't want the lower layers of colors interferring with the top layers. I've never tired fixative on graphite and have on idea how it would work on that.

I've never tried op over a fixative. Golden over graphite works so well, when i found that solution I quit looking :)

RG

truck driver
12-14-2009, 03:59 PM
Robert it's such a nice drawing I would tend to want to keep it myself.


I'm thinking trace and transfer, I'll spray it with fixative, and get out the tracing paper.

RG

kazuki
12-14-2009, 08:31 PM
Thanks for all the tips, RG. And thanks for mentioning perspective, I'll keep this in mind while drawing this picture.

I think I should start using a proper barrier. I've seen golden pumice gel being used in one of Wendy's demos. Does clear colorfix work in the same way?

Tack? Is it like blue tack?

Hal, I decided not to use spray fixative even for soft pastels. That was after I read about the toxic features of it. I paint indoors, in a slightly ventilated room and I have a small child so spray fixative is not an option for me.

Can someone let me know if pumice gel or colorfix have any effects on health? Or any restrictions like "to be used in well ventilated area"?

RG, Tracing and transferring sounds like a good idea. Hal, I would have preferred to keep the drawing too.

halthepainter
12-14-2009, 08:41 PM
Hal, I decided not to use spray fixative even for soft pastels. That was after I read about the toxic features of it. I paint indoors, in a slightly ventilated room and I have a small child so spray fixative is not an option for me.


Hi sue, I don't spray fixative inside. I'll take my work outside on the deck or in my garage to spray it. It dries in a couple minutes.

truck driver
12-14-2009, 08:46 PM
Thanks for all the tips, RG. And thanks for mentioning perspective, I'll keep this in mind while drawing this picture.

I think I should start using a proper barrier. I've seen golden pumice gel being used in one of Sammy's demos. Does clear colorfix work in the same way?

Tack? Is it like blue tack?

Hal, I decided not to use spray fixative even for soft pastels. That was after I read about the toxic features of it. I paint indoors, in a slightly ventilated room and I have a small child so spray fixative is not an option for me.

Can someone let me know if pumice gel or colorfix have any effects on health? Or any restrictions like "to be used in well ventilated area"?

RG, Tracing and transferring sounds like a good idea. Hal, I would have preferred to keep the drawing too.

Yes, blue tack is one brand, and actually probably the best brand for what I was describing.

No toxicity concerns with either colourfix, or either of goldens products (pumice gel, and pastel grounds). Yes clear colourfix works in much the same way. The texture of the surface is slightly different.
Though I wouldnt reccomend eating either of them ;)

Another thing you could try for your dry pastels and charcoal is hairspray. The brand that works best here is called AquaNet. It has a lot of the same properties of a spray fixative, but without the odor and harsh chemical smells.


RG

kazuki
12-14-2009, 09:08 PM
Hi sue, I don't spray fixative inside. I'll take my work outside on the deck or in my garage to spray it. It dries in a couple minutes.


That't a good idea, Hal.

kazuki
12-14-2009, 09:13 PM
Though I wouldnt reccomend eating either of them ;)
RG

LOL.:lol:

A hair spray sounds great. I don't think we have AquaNet here in Singapore. But I'll try the brand I have now. So hair spray doesn't change or dull the colors more than a spray fixative does, does it?

robertsloan2
12-15-2009, 01:18 AM
I used to use AquaNet back in my street art days and I eventually stopped, on the basis that a hair spray is not designed to be archival and not yellow. It gets washed out within days so any chemical changes over years after application would be irrelevant to its original purpose. It is cheaper, but I switched over to using Krylon or Blick fixative.

Now I've been intrigued by SpectraFix, which costs a little more but may last longer too and doesn't even have propellant -- it's grain alcohol and casein milk proteins formulated to make a clear archival fixative. So I'm looking at getting a can of it either next month or as soon as my Blick fixative runs out. The spray can it comes in is a refillable mister and you can get concentrate that you mix with Everclear or vodka to refill it.

So that leaves me happier on environmental grounds and maybe on toxic propellants in my own breathing space too. It sounded good, so I'll try a can of it to see if it works and then cost out whether the concentrate plus cost of vodka is cheaper. They also have a small empty reusable sprayer for use with the concentrate.

At the very least this would work out a lot better for travel since the concentrate doesn't violate any airline regulations and you can buy everclear or vodka just about anywhere in the world.

So far the only place I know carries it is Dakota Pastels, http://www.dakotapastels.com -- but I think they do ship worldwide and maybe the concentrate would be cheaper to ship than the big spray can, since even in Singapore it's probably not that hard to find cheap vodka. It doesn't have to be good stuff, just high proof white alcohol.

truck driver
12-15-2009, 03:15 AM
if you use this stick with vodka, no 180 grain everclear needs to be sprayed anywhere...

RG

truck driver
12-15-2009, 03:42 AM
Casein, is age old, though i'm kind of disturbed by this.
1. any alchohol will work. so why even mention 95% grain alchahol spraying that can be dangerous to your health, as well as if theres an open flame anywhere its over.
2. methyl alchohol rubbing alchohol contains some elements that shouldnt be breathed as well.
3. cheap russian vodka should work well.

The website mentions that it doesnt change the dry pastel visibly makes no comments about any testing of any kind.

However those are the draw backs. In theory this is how a fixative of this nature would work.

You are using the alcohol as a dispersent, casein mixes with alcahol you spray, alchahol evaporates, leaves a mist of casein on pastels. This will indeed fix the pastels. Casein forms something that can be called a milk glue as it dries. Casein is a milky white, to clear substance when wet, and dries clear. So it should perform the way they say it should. Cant tell you without trying it. However you can order it directly from there website giving you now 2 places to get it.

RG

truck driver
12-15-2009, 03:57 AM
Water (aqua), Dimethyl Ether, SD Alcohol 40-B (alcohol denat), VA/Crotonates/Vinyl Neodecandate Copolymer, Octylacrylamide/Acrylates Butylaminoethyl Methacrylate Copolymer, Aminomethylpropanol, Sodium Benzoate, Cyclohexylamine, Cyclopentasiloxane, Sodium PCA, Masking Fragrance (parfum)


Acrylayets, methacrylate, crotonates.. remove denatured alcohol , and fragrance. Replace denatured alchohol with methyl alcohol. and you have fixative. only real major difference is the spray nossle.....


RG

halthepainter
12-15-2009, 08:42 AM
Water (aqua), Dimethyl Ether, SD Alcohol 40-B (alcohol denat), VA/Crotonates/Vinyl Neodecandate Copolymer, Octylacrylamide/Acrylates Butylaminoethyl Methacrylate Copolymer, Aminomethylpropanol, Sodium Benzoate, Cyclohexylamine, Cyclopentasiloxane, Sodium PCA, Masking Fragrance (parfum)


Acrylayets, methacrylate, crotonates.. remove denatured alcohol , and fragrance. Replace denatured alchohol with methyl alcohol. and you have fixative. only real major difference is the spray nossle.....


RG

:evil: I love it when you talk dirty!:evil:

VladK
12-15-2009, 11:56 PM
First of all, thank you everyone for feedback on lighthouse.

Now comes the temple.
1. In Photoshop I Resized the image, to fit 11x14 page
2. Desaturated, Adjusted the Brightness and Contrast to have easy tracing
3. I've got Yupo translucent WC paper pad from DickBlick just to try tracing and paper itself. Paper is very smooth. But non-organic:eek: : it says 100% polypropylene, acidfree, 104lb. I should have washed hands like surgeon before tracing, because when I started with watercolor underpainting I could easily tell where my fingerprints are:D This was the only con so far.
I very seldom do tracing, usually do it freehand, but as I realize, sometimes it is very useful and helpful. Bottom line - you need a clean drawing:smug:
4. I waited until wc is dry, and primed it with clear colourfix. Will wait until dry...

truck driver
12-16-2009, 01:52 AM
Vlad,

Let me know how the yupo works for you. I'm curious as I dont know anything about it in an oil pastel context. Drawing looks good btw

RG

kazuki
12-16-2009, 04:31 AM
I guess I'll stick to the less expensive choice as of now LOL.
Anyway, I don't do much of soft pastels and OPs just need proper treatment even without fixative.

kazuki
12-16-2009, 04:45 AM
Here's my garden.

A4 sized watercolor block, Senneliers with no underpainting.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Dec-2009/109571-Dec09_292_Small.jpg

I still don't call it done (Wow I'm changing. In the past I wanted to call a painting done once there's color all over the paper) I have already made some major changes in the painting and I'm most likely to find more when I look at it with fresh eyes, or through others' eyes. That said, C&C welcome.

P.S. Forgot to mention. I found the bottom left foliage uninteresting(to me), so I extended the flower beds till near the tree.

hollyga
12-16-2009, 06:15 AM
Sue, this is gorgeous. Maybe a highlight or two in the greenery underneath the tree will bring it out more - not too much, though, 'cause it's in the shade.

Vlad - I love the drawing - can't wait to see the progress.

I've seen several mentions along the way for Yuppo - I have no clue what that is - is it a type of paper?

Holly

Pat Isaac
12-16-2009, 07:49 AM
Love the addition of the flowers, Sue. Very cheery. Maybe a little more definition of values on the white of the fountain.
Nice start Vlad. The primer might add some tooth to the Yupo. It is very smooth, but some nice work has been done on it.

Pat

truck driver
12-16-2009, 12:07 PM
Sue, this is gorgeous. Maybe a highlight or two in the greenery underneath the tree will bring it out more - not too much, though, 'cause it's in the shade.

Vlad - I love the drawing - can't wait to see the progress.

I've seen several mentions along the way for Yuppo - I have no clue what that is - is it a type of paper?

Holly

Yupo is a 100% polypropylene paper, which means it is not absorbant at all. Its vary smooth and works well for really fluid techniques, especcially with watercolor. I dont have any experience with it, as far as oil pastels go.


RG

hollyga
12-16-2009, 06:58 PM
Thanks, RG. Since I have never done too much with watercolor, I don't think I will put this on my "must have" list right away. Might be fun to try in the future, though.

Holly

halthepainter
12-16-2009, 11:28 PM
Yupo is a 100% polypropylene paper, which means it is not absorbant at all. Its vary smooth and works well for really fluid techniques, especcially with watercolor. I dont have any experience with it, as far as oil pastels go.


RG

One of our professional painters paints watercolor on yupo and initially it looks like a mess. As RG says it sits on top of the painting and it looks as if it will never look right but her paintings eventually become beautiful finished works.

A couple of other professional artists here have tried yupo but their works have thus far been very messy. Sush, don't tell them though. I certainly don't want to hurt their feelings.

VladK
12-17-2009, 10:31 PM
Here is my update.
Yupo is not that bad, but one needs to be very careful.
When i tried to remove some layer with paper towel it removed everything up to the paper, including Colourfix primer:eek: Perhaps, I pressed it more than needed:lol:
But as soon as technique is developed (as in any craft) this can be one of the good choices. As for me, tranlucent Yupo can be used to quickly transfer the drawing. I did not like it for watercolor though (probably, needed to clean surface with alcohol before applying watercolor)

halthepainter
12-17-2009, 11:09 PM
Looking very good Vlad. I like the warmth you've put in some of your stone work.

truck driver
12-18-2009, 02:09 AM
Looks like your heading in the right direction Vlad. I'm going to reserve comments for the next stage.

RG

robertsloan2
12-18-2009, 02:26 AM
Vlad, that's beautiful! I love the light streaming through the colonnade, that's a gorgeous little touch. Beautiful, very natural colors and great depth to the scene.

Pat Isaac
12-18-2009, 08:10 AM
Coming along nicely, Vlad.

Pat

kazuki
12-18-2009, 10:14 PM
Thanks for the comments, everyone.

Pat, here's what I have after adding colors to the fountain. Don't see much difference though!
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/18-Dec-2009/109571-Dec09_325_Small.jpg

Looks like I'm in need of oil pencils. But how do people who don't have oil pencils do minute work? I don't mean this is very minute work, but I mean the kind of work involved in the bridge and the top of light house in the light house painting?

Is there a way to use the OPs to do the job?

kazuki
12-18-2009, 10:19 PM
Vlad I don't think I commented in stage 1 of your temple painting. But this is really gorgeous and stage 2 is coming very well. Can't wait to see more.

I'm also curious about the Yupo. Never heard of that. Your WIP is going to be a good learning experience for me too.

And I need to mention, I like the way you have marked your colors in the tape for future reference. Must be very useful. I usually keep a working tray where I place all used colors in a painting and this working tray stays up until the whole painting is finished. But it looks like a good idea to keep the colors on paper itself I should try this one.

VladK
12-18-2009, 11:37 PM
Thanks Hal, RG , Robert, Pat, and Sue. Here is my update. All comments are welcome:wink2:
To be honest I liked regular watercolor paper much better then Yupo.

Sue, I like thick layers as you do. Looking at your closeup fountain I think oil pencils won't do any good as you have thick layer of pastel already. When I tried to use pencil on such thick layer it just removed the pastel. But on thin layers they are incredible helpful.

truck driver
12-19-2009, 02:55 AM
Sue: take a look at Hals description of using ops rubbed onto a piece of pallete' paper and applying them with a coulour shaper. You can use tortillions instead of a colour shaper as well. Also cotton swabs such as a qtip can be used for delicate work. A favorite method of mine is to lay down an area of dark, cover it with several layers of op and scrape back down to the underlying dark areas. (Thanks FishFan) you can also cut small pieces of op to work in fine details. All of these require expermintation to get to work right.

Hopefully some of this helps.

RG

truck driver
12-19-2009, 03:18 AM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/19-Dec-2009/136518-dec-chal1.jpg

not a great picture but this is where we are with this.

RG

Pat Isaac
12-19-2009, 07:42 AM
Sue, RG has given you some good tips for detail using shapers and tortillions. I do like your impasto effect though and the pencils wouldn't do what you want.
Vlad great finish on the Yupo.
RGnice start, but the picture is so small..

Pat

halthepainter
12-19-2009, 08:46 AM
Vlad that is an absolutely fantastic job. Amazing detail.

I have a number of artist friends who paint on yupo at least part of the time. However, in my opinion, only one of them does a decent job with it.. Most of their work just winds up being too smeary.

Sue, RG's advice is good. A small delicate, metal, palette knife can also be used on some of the delicate work. One of you group, I don't remember which one, uses a small brush and natural turpenoid as a solvent and paints detail on some of her paintings. It takes a long time to dry but works. I personally haven't tried that myself but I intend to try it soon.

RG your painting looks as if it will be fantastic. I see you seem to be completing one section of the painting at a time. That's a little bit of an different technique but it obiviously eliminates smearing.

With soft pastels, I worked top down, back to front, dark to light. With Ops so far, I've been laying in basic colors then working top down, back to front, etc........

SammyH
12-19-2009, 09:48 AM
Sue, I also like the your impasto rendition. It looks painterly and impressionistic. Very pretty.

Vlad, Beautiful colors. I love the reflections of the columns on the ground and the colors in the sky. The foreground columns and figures look terrific. Great job especially since it's on slick Yupo.

RG, It's difficult to make out the details of you temple. I'll be looking forward to seeing it posted again.

truck driver
12-19-2009, 06:45 PM
Yeah its small couldnt find camera had to do i t with laptop.

Hal, You cant tell because its so light but there are 2 layers of op on almost the entiere thing.

Then I add the darks from left to right, then work my way back across, and balance everything out.

Kinda weird I know but it works for me.


RG

halthepainter
12-20-2009, 09:40 AM
This is my effort on my Temple with Monks.

I played down some of the detail. Once again it's the Zorne palette of red, yellow, black and white.

Smaller details, such as the monks, were put in with with a small palette knife. I had some difficulty with my sgraffito efforts. My canvas texture betrayed me by catching my palette knife or dark pencil and diverting the line.

I added the monks at the end of the painting and intended to put them in with oil pencils but I couldn't get them to leave any pigment behind. So I wound up putting them in with a palette knife.

Anyway, I'll go with this for the moment and reevaluate it again in few days.

11 by 14 inches, canvas on masonite, black gesso and marble dust, senneliers.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/20-Dec-2009/140488-loresf_temple_monks.jpg

Suggestions welcome.

Pat Isaac
12-20-2009, 10:13 AM
Very nice, hal. I really like the group of monks and their reflection. Good detailing on the roof.

Pat

VladK
12-20-2009, 07:43 PM
Thanks everyone :) It was real challenge with the Yupo. I struggled on the last layers. First 2-3 layers were okay, later it's getting messy. Scgraffito on the roof I did with the toothpick.

Hal, nice job, and paleette worked well:thumbsup:. And you put the monks for real I thought you were kidding:wink2:

kazuki
12-20-2009, 09:49 PM
Vlad, your painting has come really awesome. And thanks for those thoughts on the fountain. I guessed that too. But if I have oil pencils, I could rely on them completely rather than applying OPs in those areas.

Thanks for those wonderful ideas, RG. Out of all the ideas, I have used tortillions before, but I didn't think they are capable of transferring color from OPs to the painting. I rather used them for minute coverage and not minute details, if I am not wrong.
Cotton swabs sounds good, does that need a thinner to be used?
I should definitely try rubbing the OPs and applying with color shaper (Thanks Hal).
But the last idea of scraping down to underlying dark areas is really brilliant and I'm sure it takes more practice than other ideas. I'm going to use both of these ideas in the future.

RG, Can't wait to see more of your painting. Hope you have found your camera now!

Thanks, Pat. I thought the same about pencils too, on top of OPs. May be using the pencils alone will help.

Thanks, Sammy.

Hal, thanks for the advice. A brush and thinned OPs sound like a promising bet. But I don't know how well I can do it provided the very small work space I have and to keep it safe from my son.
And the temple has come out really well. I love the monks over there. The little ones there, are they learning from their master?

halthepainter
12-20-2009, 10:13 PM
Hi Sue. The youngest monks I saw I would guess were about 10 years of age. Yes that was a class of youngsters.

SammyH
12-20-2009, 10:40 PM
Hal,
Love the temple with monks. I'm amazed at how much blue you were able to get using just red, yellow, black and white. The sky is cool and the group of monks add a lot of interest. You are getting to be an expert with OPs.

halthepainter
12-20-2009, 10:54 PM
Hal,
Love the temple with monks. I'm amazed at how much blue you were able to get using just red, yellow, black and white. The sky is cool and the group of monks add a lot of interest. You are getting to be an expert with OPs.

Thank you Sammy. I wish I could feel that I'm becoming expert in the medium. There are several more techniques I want to familarize myself with.

As mentioned earlier, I laid in my sky with mixed white with a little black and the result looked dead white. Once I laid in warm clouds the sky suddenly read as blue. I confess I was a bit amazed.

marionh
12-21-2009, 03:05 AM
Sue, love your lively treatment.

But how do people who don't have oil pencils do minute work? I don't mean this is very minute work, but I mean the kind of work involved in the bridge and the top of light house in the light house painting?
Sue for lines and finer work I use the bottom sharper edge of the pastel. I also break my pastels which gives me a sharp edge and allows me to use the side for broad strokes - pretty much as I do with soft pastels. For the light house top, I used a carbon pencil to draw the shape and then scribbled some pastel on the side and lifted it with a colour shaper, and pressed it onto the paper.

Vlad, Very nice. Love your roof line and reflections and also the way you have captured the light on the stonework. Thanks for the WIP pics, they were very interesting.

RG Hard to see :lol: but what I do see looks very interesting.

Hal, Your roof is superb and I love the addition of the monks, it provides a great focal point. Your limited palette certainly works for you.

marionh
12-21-2009, 07:41 AM
Well I think this is now finished. I've been giving it a good dose of looking at and have fiddled about enough I think :lol:
I've certainly been learning about how to correct mistakes.:)
C&Cs more than welcome as I can always fiddle some more.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/21-Dec-2009/42113-lighthouse_800x600.jpg

It seems that the longer I leave it the more the support shows through. Is this normal and because the OP soaks in? or a feature of the support which is Fisher sanded paper?

halthepainter
12-21-2009, 09:20 AM
Beautiful Job Marion. It's such a bright cheery painting. Love it.

Great foreground rocks. The photo had darkened that area too much but your addition of them is great.

Pat Isaac
12-21-2009, 09:23 AM
Nicely done, Marion. The water and rocks are just great.

Pat

VladK
12-21-2009, 09:31 AM
Marion, I like your painting very much. Especially dramatic windy sky, moving water in the rocks. Impressive work:thumbsup:

And thank you for the feedback on the temple. I tried to convey impression of warmth after the summer rain had just passed.

Sue, I also use small children's erasers (kind that can be weared on a pencil) as a color shapers.
The advantage is you can cut the tips to any shape you want and they are cheap (I bought pack of 20 in a dollar store). And they are perfect fit on the other side of medium tortillions.
So you can put them on tortillions and have a lot of 2-in-1 tools with different shapes:cat:

And I very often use the same "bottom edge" technique as Marion described.

robertsloan2
12-21-2009, 10:58 AM
Marion, that is gorgeous! I love the sky and the water, the buildings are so solid and three dimensional, the light pouring on everything is consistent and brilliant. Wonderful painting. Great composition too.

truck driver
12-21-2009, 01:36 PM
Vlad, your painting has come really awesome. And thanks for those thoughts on the fountain. I guessed that too. But if I have oil pencils, I could rely on them completely rather than applying OPs in those areas.

Thanks for those wonderful ideas, RG. Out of all the ideas, I have used tortillions before, but I didn't think they are capable of transferring color from OPs to the painting. I rather used them for minute coverage and not minute details, if I am not wrong.
Cotton swabs sounds good, does that need a thinner to be used?
I should definitely try rubbing the OPs and applying with color shaper (Thanks Hal).
But the last idea of scraping down to underlying dark areas is really brilliant and I'm sure it takes more practice than other ideas. I'm going to use both of these ideas in the future.

RG, Can't wait to see more of your painting. Hope you have found your camera now!

Thanks, Pat. I thought the same about pencils too, on top of OPs. May be using the pencils alone will help.

Thanks, Sammy.

Hal, thanks for the advice. A brush and thinned OPs sound like a promising bet. But I don't know how well I can do it provided the very small work space I have and to keep it safe from my son.
And the temple has come out really well. I love the monks over there. The little ones there, are they learning from their master?

If your interested in playing with ops with thinner, I am going to suggest some alternatives to what we normally consider to be thinner that work great with oil pastels.

1. Linseed oil - refined linseed oil not boiled works well. non poisonus used in foodstuffs.
2. Safflower oil - slightly less yellowing than linseed oil - again makes an excellent cooking oil
3. Walnut oil - Really good salad dressing
4. Mineral oil

Dont buy these from a grocery store :) they will most likely contain vitamin a or e which will keep them from drying at all. Of the 4 Mineral oil/ Baby oil has the most harmfull affect, none of them have real odor issues. All of them are at least as affective as oms in my experience.

Also with CP or oil pencil you will have better luck laying these down first and adding op on top.

The tortillions can be used to lay down oil pastel as well as move it around, put some of the op on a wax paper, and pick it up with the tortillion.

If you do use ops with a brush make sure you get the brush clean, it can be fun to get the wax out of the brush. Although soap and water will accomplish it.

One more .. there is a product produced by Weber that is called Res-n-gel, that can be used to create sort of a paint from ops. It is a oil paint extender gell. To use it put some op on wax paper with a dab of the gel, and blend together it will form a creamy paste. You can then apply this with a brush, a pallete knife, or tortillion. You can also use it to flatten layers of a painting.

One of the Oil Pastel society signature members uses this a lot in his work (George Shipperly).

Though a warning about Res-N-Gel dont use it as a isolation layer, It will delaminate the painting. (thanks to Reeta for this information)

RG

truck driver
12-21-2009, 01:54 PM
Well I think this is now finished. I've been giving it a good dose of looking at and have fiddled about enough I think :lol:
I've certainly been learning about how to correct mistakes.:)
C&Cs more than welcome as I can always fiddle some more.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/21-Dec-2009/42113-lighthouse_800x600.jpg

It seems that the longer I leave it the more the support shows through. Is this normal and because the OP soaks in? or a feature of the support which is Fisher sanded paper?


This looks really well, as a suggestion for the future, you might want to add some slight colour to your clouds and sky. Really light yellow, light violet works well. This helps add definition to the clouds, creating an overall deeper impression of the sky.

RG

paul444
12-22-2009, 08:06 AM
Well done everyone some excellent paintings this month. :clap: :clap:

Well here is mine... its 11 X 9 using sennelier pastels.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/22-Dec-2009/82968-light_house__ds_wc.jpg

Pat Isaac
12-22-2009, 08:21 AM
Well done, Paul. Nice color.

Pat

halthepainter
12-22-2009, 08:57 AM
Beautiful job Paul. Love the vibrancy of your wall as well as the beautiful colors in the painting.

SammyH
12-22-2009, 10:49 AM
Marion, Beautiful painting with great colors. I also like the rocks and water.

Paul, Vibrant colors. The brick structure certainly looks like an old, wore building. Very nice painting.

truck driver
12-22-2009, 11:48 PM
Paul: where you been hiding? I've missed your vibrant artwork. Thanks for demonstrating what I was talking about with the clouds. :) I love the vibrancy and depth you have managed to bring to this image. As well as what you have done with the rock wall.

RG

robertsloan2
12-23-2009, 12:30 AM
Paul, that is gorgeous! I love the texture of the rock wall. The clouds are beautiful, the water's rich and natural, the tower looks real -- everything's great in this one. Composition balances perfect.

truck driver
12-23-2009, 10:40 AM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/23-Dec-2009/136518-dec-chal-preview.jpg

I promised a better photo, theres still a lot of work to do on this.

RG

VladK
12-23-2009, 10:52 AM
Paul, beautiful bright work.

RG, this step has come out great. I like the way you have prepared this layer. Can't wait for the update.:music:
Did you use your earlier pencil drawing on this one?

halthepainter
12-23-2009, 10:59 AM
RG, it's showing great promise.

One small thing: your line on our middle column is arching down. That division between the blocks of the column would be above your eye level and should be arching up like the rim of a glass held above eye level.

truck driver
12-23-2009, 11:45 AM
Hal: Yep it is, and yep your right. Theres a lot of work with the columns, I'm happy somebody caught my perspective mistake. :) theres a couple more there right now however the others are part of what I'm trying to accomplish at this point, when I add the next layer those mistakes will go away. The curve on the column was to see if anybody said anything about it. ;)

Vlad: This is a transfer of the drawing, Didnt come out quite as clean as I would of liked. Transfer paper moved around on me a bit, and I didnt transfer quite as much detail as I should of. I just couldnt bring myself to use the original drawing, as it is a rather nice piece of artwork in its own right.

RG

truck driver
12-23-2009, 11:55 AM
Vlad: I knew I missed one, erasers can work in a couple of ways with oil pastels as colour shapers which you mentioned, you can also use erasers to lighten areas of op work to good affect. I've talked about using the putty stuff to hang stuff on the wall with graphite, you can lift op using the same technique. You can also use kneaded erasers to lift and shape areas, as well as vinyl, though with vinyl make certain you brush it off, and dont try to wipe it off with your hand, as you will cause more damage than good.

RG

VladK
12-23-2009, 12:41 PM
RG, I also had the same problem with transferring until I taped the paper on all four sides;)

And about erasers, yep, you're right, anything (to the certain degree;) ) can be used to move OPs, just need to be cautious. And thanks to this forum and people we have around here, we can listen, learn, and share experience.

Merry Christmas everybody!

GOSH
12-23-2009, 04:04 PM
GOSH! Wow! The quality of the challenges is very high. Great work from everybody.

Attempt #2
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/23-Dec-2009/143278-sonia_-_december_chal.jpg


Attempt #1
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/23-Dec-2009/143278-sonia_attempt_1_dec_chall.jpg

Senneliers and Holbein (indigo blue), 2 different surfaces and sizes. I seem to have trouble with this challenge: can't decide on colors, can't concentrate on details...I need a doughnut. :wave: :wave:

halthepainter
12-23-2009, 04:25 PM
Gosh delighted you're participating.

I like both efforts. They are quite enjoyable.

Your warm sky is wonderfully colorful and the colors work so well with the temple colors.

This is a personal belief, that other artists here may disagree with, but I believe warm colors sell better than cool colors, not that any of us care if our paintings sell or not. :rolleyes:

SammyH
12-23-2009, 04:36 PM
Gosh,

This is a difficult challenge and anybody who is trying it should be congratulated. Your drawing on the first one is right on and the pillars and figure look really good. I think all you need to do with this one is tone down the blues and put some texture on the roof and reflections on the ground.

The image of the second try seems to be fuzzy which could very well be from reproducing it. On this one, the sky competes with the temple and the back column is leaning forward. The ground does look interesting and reflective.

My vote goes to the first try which is very nice. Please post it again if you work on it. It may help to crop some of the foreground off and put some of the beautiful colors of the forward columns on the ground and in the sky..

SammyH
12-23-2009, 04:42 PM
Sorry, Hal. I wouldn't deliberately contradict you but we were typing at the same time. I agree that warm colors attract people more than cool and I personally favor warm colors. IMHO, that beautiful orange/yellow sky does draw one's eye.

halthepainter
12-23-2009, 05:07 PM
Sorry, Hal. I wouldn't deliberately contradict you but we were typing at the same time. I agree that warm colors attract people more than cool and I personally favor warm colors. IMHO, that beautiful orange/yellow sky does draw one's eye.

Sammy you're more than welcome to contradict me. My wife does it all the time no matter what the subject. :p

GOSH
12-23-2009, 05:51 PM
Thanks, SammyH and hal. Funny you were saying something about orange...

Attempt #3
Please use protective eyewear :cool:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/23-Dec-2009/143278-sonia-dec_chal-_attempt_3.jpg

halthepainter
12-23-2009, 05:54 PM
Wow Gosh, you just blew my computer screen. :eek: :lol:

kazuki
12-23-2009, 10:11 PM
Wow, I'm gone for 2 days and the thread got 2 more pages of posts. So fast, especially during holiday season. Keep it up guys and gals. :thumbsup:


Vlad, I hadn't thought about erasers as shapers. This is great idea. I couldn't get hold of the kind of erasers that go behind a pencil but I did buy some less expensive eraser and I intend to cut them in different shapes. As of mounting them on to something for ease of use, hmm, I'll have to think about it.

RG, using edible oils for thinners is a great idea. Will try one or most of them in the near future. I haven't used tortillons for this purpose but I'll do it now. I didn't get wax paper when I tried before. So I bought tracing paper to store my OP paintings. I guess the tracing paper should solve this issue too?
Haven't heard off Res-N-gel so far. Will check it out during my next art store visit.

Paul, that's a nice painting. Love all the details.

RG, this stage of your painting is coming really well.
Have been using putty erasers to lift off OPs even though I read in a book that putty erasers don't work on OPs the way they do on soft pastels. But it works for me. :smug: I have never tried vinyl.

Gosh, both your versions are beautiful. They are different in their own rights.
I just typed the above before seeing your version 3. You are adventurous :wink2:

halthepainter
12-26-2009, 11:05 PM
Wow, I thought the temple would be a tough one for everyone. The work by everyone has been fantastic.

Super jobs on the Lighthouse at Fort Constitution. The competition has been so great that I decided the do the Prescott Park Fountains.

This is all Erengis, all direct application and no blending. The surface is 140 pound cold pressed water color paper, terre cotta color fix ground. Image size 11 by 14.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/26-Dec-2009/140488-lores_op_prescott_fountain.JPG

The photo is a bit darker than the actual image.

Suggestions are welcome.

truck driver
12-27-2009, 02:56 AM
Looks like you've painted that scene before, Hal :)

Good Job bro.

RG

hollyga
12-27-2009, 08:01 AM
This is another WOW, Hal, and I love all the rich pure color with no blending. I also really like your rendition of the temple with the little group of monks - both are stunning!

Holly

halthepainter
12-27-2009, 11:19 AM
Looks like you've painted that scene before, Hal :)

Good Job bro.

RG

Thank you RG. Yeah, I've set up in that garden several times for plein air painting sessions. It's wonderfully cool on a hot summer day. There are three fountains and depending on where you set up you can get interesting variations in composition and lighting effects.

Hi Holly. Thank you and I'm happy you enjoyed the painting.

SammyH
12-27-2009, 02:50 PM
Hal,
Very nice garden. I like the unblended impressionistic look. Vibrant colors.

kazuki
12-27-2009, 09:17 PM
Wow, I love your garden, Hal. :clap: Especially I like the way you have done the flower bed. Makes me think I should have done mine differently! :envy:
:lol:

halthepainter
12-27-2009, 11:02 PM
Hi Sue, thank you for the kind words.

In a prior post you wrote of difficulty in doing detail in OPs. My narrow vertical fence posts were done with a freshly broken OP. I used the new fresh edge for thin lines.

You seem to want some suggestions about your flowerbeds and I hope you won't mind if I make a few suggestions.

Your dark mass of flowers in the foreground doesn't read as a flat bed but as a vertical (at least to me) Perhaps patterns of flowers in a diagonal with variations in light patterns could also make that read as a flat bed of flowers. The dots of flowers in the dark area are all about the same size, with uniform spacing, Variations in texture, size and patterns make for a more interesting visual subject.

The remainder of the flowerbeds read well.

I can't determine the direction of your light source. I would think there should be some shadows on your pathways around the fountain and flowerbeds.

paul444
12-28-2009, 05:01 AM
Thanks for the feed back everyone, RG your temple is looking good.
Gosh, two great temples, to me the warm orange sky really sets it off nicely.
Hal, fantastic job on the garden, you really nailed them flower beds.
Sue, we all see and interpret things differently, this does not mean it is wrong, just different... I think we all see things in our own drawings we would change or do different and change our approach in the next painting.

kazuki
12-28-2009, 10:40 AM
Hal, thanks for mentioning the flower bed. I did think that they look a bit 2d. I had a well thought plan for the flower bed. I started by drawing perspective lines for the rows of plants and applied ground and dark green colors along those lines but somewhere down the layers, they got lost. And I ended up with a mass of flowers with no particular 'gardening plan'!!!! :-(
But I had no plan to vary the size or colors of the flowers themselves to denote distance. A valuable lesson for future :-)

VladK
12-29-2009, 01:36 PM
Gosh, I like your temples, especially attempt #2

Hal, your fountain is beatiful. I like the flower bed and how the ground breaks through. Erengi ops have great colors and I use them, too, mostly without blending.

halthepainter
12-29-2009, 01:49 PM
Thank you Vlad.

kazuki
12-30-2009, 09:02 PM
And here comes my third entry, but with the addition of some surprise characters.

Thai dancers in a temple:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Dec-2009/109571-Dec09_417_Small.jpg

Thanks to Hal for bringing up the idea of including some monks here, I got a chance to include these dancers who were in my list for a long time!

Thanks a ton, RG, for helping me off-thread with the positioning of the dancers.

I did change my signature, in case I forget to add "C&C welcome". Please feel free to say whatever you want to.

truck driver
12-30-2009, 09:27 PM
Hal, thanks for mentioning the flower bed. I did think that they look a bit 2d. I had a well thought plan for the flower bed. I started by drawing perspective lines for the rows of plants and applied ground and dark green colors along those lines but somewhere down the layers, they got lost. And I ended up with a mass of flowers with no particular 'gardening plan'!!!! :-(
But I had no plan to vary the size or colors of the flowers themselves to denote distance. A valuable lesson for future :-)


I missed this earlier, Colour variation is an extremely important part of perspective. Another interesting part of perspective in painting, is allowing the details to fade with distance. A really good example here is FE Church's landscape work. The closer leaves are highly detailed, and textured. Some say he used a copal varnish based medium to model the leaves, and make them stand out even more in the foreground. With less and less modeling going back into the near and distant foreground.

RG

truck driver
12-30-2009, 09:31 PM
And here comes my third entry, but with the addition of some surprise characters.

Thai dancers in a temple:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Dec-2009/109571-Dec09_417_Small.jpg

Thanks to Hal for bringing up the idea of including some monks here, I got a chance to include these dancers who were in my list for a long time!

Thanks a ton, RG, for helping me off-thread with the positioning of the dancers.

I did change my signature, in case I forget to add "C&C welcome". Please feel free to say whatever you want to.


I think this came out really well, I've been looking forward to seeing it, ever since you sent me the picture of the dancers. Very colourfull and well thought out. Very nice work with the shadows as well. My one nitpick is in the roundness of the temple columns they somehow read as square in this one. Perhaps others will see it differently though.

RG

halthepainter
12-30-2009, 10:10 PM
Love it Sue. Your dancers are wonderful and your roof is fantastic, I love the color gradation.

Please tell us the size of the image, materials used and any special techniques you may have used.

Pat Isaac
12-31-2009, 07:54 AM
Great finish, Sue. The dancers certainly add a colorful note and I really like the roof texture.

Pat

halthepainter
12-31-2009, 09:56 PM
The Challenge

The Artists

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-Dec-2009/140488-gosh_light.jpg By Goshhttp://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-Dec-2009/140488-gosh_temple_cool.jpg http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-Dec-2009/140488-gosh_temple_warm.jpg Also by Gosh

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-Dec-2009/140488-hals_garden.jpg By Hal http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-Dec-2009/140488-hals_temple.jpg By Hal

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-Dec-2009/140488-marion_light.jpg Marion Light http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-Dec-2009/140488-paul_light.jpg Paul light http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-Dec-2009/140488-rg_temple.jpg RG Temple http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-Dec-2009/140488-sue_garden.jpg Sue Garden http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-Dec-2009/140488-sue_litght.jpg Sue Light http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-Dec-2009/140488-Sue_Temple.jpg Sue Temple http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-Dec-2009/140488-vlad_light.jpg Vlad Light http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-Dec-2009/140488-vlad_garden vlad Garden http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-Dec-2009/140488-vlad_temple Vlad Temple

Wonderful Job Artists, I hope I didn't miss anyone. I maxed out this post anyway. Thank you all for making this an exciting challenge.:thumbsup:

Hal

kazuki
12-31-2009, 10:11 PM
Thanks, RG and Pat. RG what you said about the pillars is true. After you mentioned, it even looks to me like that. May be a bit more blending will help.

Love it Sue. Your dancers are wonderful and your roof is fantastic, I love the color gradation.

Please tell us the size of the image, materials used and any special techniques you may have used.

Thanks Hal. It's A4 size, canson paper, fully senns with no underpainting just a transferred drawing. I thought of posting it WIP but I wanted to keep my dancers a surprise :D
I used most layers in this painting than any other of my painting. The roof and most other areas contain almost 4 layers. Roof was done by sgraffitto.
Actually this painting gave me a back ache :eek: because I was totally absorbed in working the roof and was determined to complete in a short time cap. But I enjoyed it so well.

halthepainter
12-31-2009, 10:42 PM
Hi Sue for we Yankees, what is an A4 size. I don't think your columns read all that bad, in several, they sugguest that they are curved and not flat. Often that is enough, just the suggestion of roundness is enough.

kazuki
12-31-2009, 11:47 PM
Hi Sue for we Yankees, what is an A4 size.

Hal, A4 size is 8.3 x 11.7 in. Wow, I didn't know A4 size is asian standard. This is very common in India and in Singapore too, where I live now!

In India, all exam papers, copier and printer papers, and almost everything else is A4 by default. As far as I know, we have A3, A2, A1, A5 etc too.

robertsloan2
12-31-2009, 11:48 PM
These are fantastic! Thanks for that roundup at the end, I'm overwhelmed by the beauty of this month's paintings.

Everyone's invited to jump in on mine when it's midnight your time. I posted a little early because I might crash before midnight and anyway the ball dropped in NYC a couple of hours ago.

kazuki
12-31-2009, 11:49 PM
The Challenge

Wonderful Job Artists, I hope I didn't miss anyone. I maxed out this post anyway. Thank you all for making this an exciting challenge.:thumbsup:

Hal[/LEFT]

Thanks for the challenge, Hal. All the pictures were great challenges and it was very exciting!

GOSH
01-01-2010, 03:45 AM
Terrific Month!!:clap:
Thank you Hal

paul444
01-01-2010, 05:25 AM
Well done, Excellent paintings .

truck driver
01-01-2010, 07:05 AM
Great work from everybody, we added some new people to our challenges, talked a lot about some great artwork topics.

RG

Pat Isaac
01-01-2010, 08:40 AM
Thanks for putting all the paintings together, Hal. Great to see them that way.

Pat

SammyH
01-01-2010, 09:23 AM
Hal,
Showing the collection of work all together is a really nice touch. There is some very nice work there.
I'm really glad that I was wrong about December being a slow month because we were all so busy. It's easy to see that this gang has their priorities right.
Thanks for hosting the December challenge.

oldrockchick
01-03-2010, 01:39 PM
Apologies Hal for not taking part. I did run them off and put them to do but this month has been non-stop, what with being away and then all the radio stuff, reviews to write and Christmas shopping and getting the house ready for visitors. I had to move a lot of my art stuff into cupboards I only had a few pencils out. When I did get time I was too exhausted.

Some lovely refs though and I have already given a thought to the lighthouse.... if it's the 'thought that counts' I guess I've done something as I have visualised how I would have done it.

Thank you for hosting and congratulations on the high calibre of everybody's work.

I feel a little bad as I know how disappointign it can be not to have many people participate. :o I am so very sorry.

hollyga
01-03-2010, 03:00 PM
Hal, I apologize for not participating, as well. December is a BEAR of a month for us postal folks. What little time I had, I spent concentrating on the water lily and on Kaya, of course! (She is a trooper, by the way. She is doing as well as she can and still has her very good moments. She's loving all of her special treats, special food preparation, and all of the special attention!) If I had had time, I would have done the light house and the garden - I don't think I could have tackled the temple. What wonderful references and thank you for hosting!

Holly

halthepainter
01-03-2010, 04:29 PM
No apologies necessary Holly and Lin. I had second thoughts about hosting December because it's such a busy month.

I was amazed by the quality of work done by everyone on the challenges. I imagined that the temple would be a real bear for everyone but everyone just blew me away with their results. The results on the lighthouse were amazing also.

Only a couple of us tried the garden fountain and other than mine those result were terrific also.