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View Full Version : Anyone Tried Color Mixing With Acrylic Inks?


mickeyw3340
11-23-2009, 10:15 AM
I have really gotten excited about the use of Liquitex Acrylic Inks in my paintings. For Instance the veins in a tree leaf and those kind of things. Has anyone had any luck mixing colors? For instance, I don't like carbon black. In my paintings I use UMB and Burnt Sienna for darks and would like to do the same with the inks. Any advice appreciated. I plan to experiment over the 4 day weeknd, but thought I would throw this out for comments.

objectivistartist
11-23-2009, 10:56 AM
I use the acrylic inks all the time in my ink paintings, so yes, they never gave me problems - is like glazing with thinned paints...

mickeyw3340
11-23-2009, 11:30 AM
I use the acrylic inks all the time in my ink paintings, so yes, they never gave me problems - is like glazing with thinned paints...
Thanks Robert. :thumbsup: My plan wasn't so much glazing as it was to use some small screw top containers and mix just a few custom colors that would be handy for use with the pens.

Einion
11-23-2009, 05:13 PM
Has anyone had any luck mixing colors? For instance, I don't like carbon black. In my paintings I use UMB and Burnt Sienna for darks and would like to do the same with the inks.
It's all the same, pretty much. It's just down to pigments and how they mix - if you're using the same ones then they'll mix in much the same way, if you're using different ones you'll have to adjust.

Einion

Briar Rose
11-23-2009, 06:47 PM
What are acrylic inks? I have only heard of acrylic paints. And I have some WN inks. I like using a couple of different mediums for my paints, mostly water color and acrylic. You have my interests now.

Can you post some of what you are going to do?

mickeyw3340
11-24-2009, 09:06 AM
Hi Rose,
I don't have anything worth looking at yet, but what I am using the acrylic ink for is things that most would use a rigger brush for. Veins in a leaf, wire on a fence, tiny grasses and weeds, etc. Acylic ink is just acrylic in a very thin ink form. You use a dip pen to apply it. A set of Speedball brand pens includes two handles and an assortment of various widths of nibs. I like the control it gives me in some cases. My first application for it has been the tiny black feathers in the mask of a male cardinal bird project I am doing.

eeglug
11-24-2009, 03:01 PM
Do these inks have similar lightfast properties as their paint counterparts?

Mickey, from your description it sounds like you are using these inks on top of (dry) acrylic paint layers - correct?

I'm also wondering if one can apply acrylic paint and acrylic ink together in an effort to create a blend or gradient - assuming that the paint has been thinned down with medium or water so that they will actually mix.

mickeyw3340
11-24-2009, 03:42 PM
Do these inks have similar lightfast properties as their paint counterparts?

They are their paint counterparts

Mickey, from your description it sounds like you are using these inks on top of (dry) acrylic paint layers - correct?

Correct

I'm also wondering if one can apply acrylic paint and acrylic ink together in an effort to create a blend or gradient - assuming that the paint has been thinned down with medium or water so that they will actually mix.

Yes they can be mixed.

The ink is liquitex acrylic thinned down to ink level. I have noted that when dry the ink can be lifted with a wet paper towel scrubbed quite hard. It is not as moisture proof as the full bodied paint.


..

eeglug
11-24-2009, 11:35 PM
Thanks! I'll have to give them a try.

Charlie's Mum
11-25-2009, 05:12 PM
Do these inks have similar lightfast properties as their paint counterparts?
Acrylic inks are good, permanent and lightfast.

Mickey, from your description it sounds like you are using these inks on top of (dry) acrylic paint layers - correct?

If you want to use the inks above or under acrylic paints, that's Ok - they are simply liquid, fluid acrylics, with added versatility.

I'm also wondering if one can apply acrylic paint and acrylic ink together in an effort to create a blend or gradient - assuming that the paint has been thinned down with medium or water so that they will actually mix.

There's no problem mixing the inks with water.
I don't use them with heavier paint but that's not to say you cannot.
They are highly saturated colour so can be watered down considerably.


For those who would like to know more about their properties, here is the link to the Brilliance of Acrylic Inks (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=285864) classroom, in the Information Kiosk.

*The inks are so much more versatile than confining their use to pen work.
*They will mix.
*They are mostly transparent and therefore layers show through with delightful results in colour mixing.
*You can use the opaque ones to cover errors if necessary.
*The white is uaually opaque and can be used (in layers) to paint over and to paint out mistakes.

noodle1
11-26-2009, 11:56 AM
Been reading here and Maureen I've been looking for this..Yay thank you for posting the link. I bought just about every color of the Liquitex (so impressed with your work with them) now I get to try. Have used with quill pens but not with a brush..sorry to interrupt the conversation just so excited...LOL

Elaine