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View Full Version : Art Movement-November-Dutch and Flemish Renaissance Painting


trafford
10-31-2009, 12:13 PM
Our art movement for November is:

DUTCH and FLEMISH RENAISSANCE PAINTING (1500-1584)

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-Oct-2009/42757-wayfarer2.jpg
Hieronymous Bosch

I thought this time period was a good idea as so many of these artists did genre paintings: people eating, celebrating or just lots of food. A kick off for whatever holidays we celebrate at this time of year.

Here is a link http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dutch_and_Flemish_Renaissance_painting

and some artists....

trafford
10-31-2009, 12:34 PM
I'm sorry, my PC keeps freezing...I'll do the best I can, but may have to abandon til later.

Hang in there I'll have to finish tonight. :(

gakinme
10-31-2009, 06:20 PM
Thank you, Janet, for this thread. I love this period. I have a book on the drawings back then plus I started taking notice of Bruegel's work only recently. Love the many characters in one picture. Will definitely give these a try as soon as I'm rested.

gakinme
10-31-2009, 08:23 PM
First one is graphite stick of Lucas Van Leyden's An Old Man Drawing. Original was black chalk.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-Oct-2009/86669-lucasvanleyden_oldmandrawing.jpg

Second one is Pieter Bruegel the elder, The Painter and the Connoisseur with Prismacolor pencil. The original was with ink but I was too lazy.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-Oct-2009/86669-pieterbruegel_painterandconnoisseur.jpg

brianvds
11-01-2009, 12:49 AM
As it happens, already have a copy of the Bruegel self-portrait that I did last year as part of a completely different project:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-Oct-2009/142294-pr5_bruegel.JPG

At the time I was trying my hand at miniatures - it is only a few centimetres high - but without much success because I don't have a steady enough hand, and one can in any event not do any better on such a small scale than you can on a larger scale.

But for this project I think I'll revisit Bruegel, even though I find much of his work a bit depressing... ;-)

trafford
11-01-2009, 08:15 AM
Thanks everyone, couldn't get my computer to working yesterday....but you thankfully ran with it.

Pieter Aertsen (1508-1575)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pieter_Aertsen

456554

Pieter Bruegel the elder (1525-1569)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pieter_Bruegel_the_Elder

456555

Pieter Bruegel younger (1564-1663)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pieter_Brueghel_the_Younger

456557

trafford
11-01-2009, 08:41 AM
....and then there is Hieronymous Bosch (1450-1516)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hieronymus_Bosch

456559

For newbies to this forum: Please copy or be inspired by any artists of this period. You might want to do something of your own 'in the style of' or take just a small portion of a painting to study. Have fun and do art.

Feel free to post any thoughts, links etc. that you want. I'll try to add some more when my computer decides to behave-Janet :rolleyes:

trafford
11-01-2009, 08:47 AM
OK, here's the image...I'm giving up and going back to bed :eek:

456560

azulparsnip
11-01-2009, 12:13 PM
this will be fun, painting food while smelling turkey cook

artbyjune
11-01-2009, 05:39 PM
This is definitely an interesting period. I like Bosch...having just recently seen a book on his work.

trafford
11-02-2009, 05:22 AM
Bosch seems to be almost a surrealist. I think I'd like to do little bits of his paintings like that egg, bird, sort of plant in the picture I posted. Want to read more about him and what fellow artists thought of his work.

P.S. I apologize for mis-spelling his first name....I had a bad couple of days.

artbyjune
11-02-2009, 01:49 PM
Does Hans Holbein the younger fit in to this period/style?

http://www.hans-holbein.org/

LGHumphrey
11-02-2009, 03:10 PM
Copy after a selfportrait by Maerten van Heemskerk, 1553.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/02-Nov-2009/60616-P1040086.JPG

trafford
11-02-2009, 04:13 PM
LG, I think this is one of the best portraits you've posted. I will have to look van Heemskerk up.

June, Holbein could fit in even if he was German. They were all Renaissance painters of the same time period. As a matter of fact there is the early Dutch Renaissance that includes the painter you like Roger van der Weyden.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Early_Netherlandish_painting

I just didn't want to go as far as The Golden Age (Vermeer, Hals etc.) Too crowded. :)

artbyjune
11-04-2009, 10:02 AM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/04-Nov-2009/106623-boschfigcrow1a6k.jpg

Small study of one figure from Bosch's Garden of earthly delights. Gouache, 4 ins square. The more I look at his work, the better I like it. I wish I had a large print of this painting (triptych)...I am going to search for a web copy that allows you to zoom in for details.

See you later.:wave:

trafford
11-12-2009, 08:25 AM
Very inspired by...a Walker/Bosch study. Like the modern feel of the boy and the wonderful bird. :heart:

artbyjune
11-23-2009, 09:40 AM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/23-Nov-2009/106623-magdalene1a6k.jpg


Here's my initial drawing for a study of R. van der Weyden. A portrait of Mary Magdelene. My drawing is 6 by 8 ins...so quite small really. Don't know if I'll get around to colouring it before the end of the month!:wave:

artbyjune
11-24-2009, 09:52 AM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/24-Nov-2009/106623-magdalenecol1a6k.jpg


A quick colour-in, done this morning, with watercolours.

I was interested in the background mainly, or at least, in the way the old masters had portrait sitters in front of landscapes.

:wave:

LGHumphrey
11-24-2009, 04:14 PM
Lovely work, June, I like those colours.

Here's another one after Maerten van Heemskerk.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/24-Nov-2009/60616-P1040085.JPG

brianvds
11-24-2009, 10:39 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/24-Nov-2009/106623-magdalenecol1a6k.jpg


A quick colour-in, done this morning, with watercolours.

I was interested in the background mainly, or at least, in the way the old masters had portrait sitters in front of landscapes.

:wave:

Lovely work! I am so completely in awe of Van der Weyden that thus far I have never dared to try copying anything by him! :o

artbyjune
11-25-2009, 02:50 AM
Beautiful work Lawrence. I love those eyes staring right at us!

Brian, I hope to see you copy van der Weyden. I love his rich colours. My copy -because its in watercolours- doesn't do justice to the richness of his work in oils but it was very instructive for me. And I am happy with my result.

azulparsnip
11-25-2009, 10:18 AM
Lawrence - what exceptional portraits. The first one I like the shadowed side - the subtle colors and form and the beard is warm with the light percolating thru it.

June - wonderful, wonderful. luminous. The background is lovely also.

gakinme
11-25-2009, 07:51 PM
June, beautiful lady. Very soft looking. And good colors too.

I borrowed a few landscape painting books of the Dutch and Flemish period raring to go and then realized it was not exactly the right period.:o

Anyway, here's one. :lol:

Derwent Drawing Pencil - based on a drawing of Simon de Vlieger 's work called Rijnsburg Abbey 1630

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/24-Nov-2009/86669-simondevlieger_rijnsburgabbey.jpg

artbyjune
11-26-2009, 12:32 PM
Good work, Sandra. I love the birds and animals especially, but that's just me!

I really like Dutch and Flemish landscape drawings. I guess that could be a whole new 'art movement' topic!

azulparsnip
11-29-2009, 09:06 PM
I'm sorry I haven't gotten anything done to post in here :( I hope to do something in the next day or so.

trafford
11-30-2009, 04:42 PM
I didn't get to this either, but hope to do a quickie soon. Beautiful work June and LG and Sandra...nice landscape. Like the sepia.

gakinme
11-30-2009, 08:36 PM
Here is a quick sketch based on Thomas Gainsborough (1727-1788) A road through a Wood, with figures on horseback and on foot.

Derwent Graphitint with wash
Michael's housebrand watercolor paper 90 lbs

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Nov-2009/86669-thomasgainsborough_roadthruwood.jpg

gakinme
12-02-2009, 12:05 AM
Whoops, I just noticed I am 200 years too late. Haha...

azulparsnip
12-03-2009, 07:43 PM
are they hunting for a turkey????

gakinme
12-03-2009, 09:29 PM
I think they are just passing through, Robin. No great significance.

brianvds
12-06-2009, 06:16 AM
At last worked up the courage to tackle the utterly awesome Van der Weyden; I tried out a detail from his Deposition. Seeing as most of his surviving drawings are in silverpoint, I decided to use what I consider to be the modern equivalent, namely ballpoint pen, which also creates thin lines of even width, and also cannot be erased. Exhilarating and terrifying at the same time, at least if you do it the way I did it, namely to storm right in without a preliminary pencil outline.

Whatever mistakes you make you just have to live with or find a way to work into the drawing in such a way that they are not too noticeable. But for this same reason it also sort of liberates you to shrug off your mistakes, seeing as you can't do anything about them anyway, which to some extent helps to force a somewhat more bold approach. Anyway, enough philosophy; here's my attempt:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Dec-2009/142294-183-8378_IMG.JPG

trafford
12-06-2009, 07:48 AM
A very good attempt, indeed. :thumbsup:

artbyjune
12-06-2009, 09:51 AM
I think it is an excellent study, Brian. I wouldn't mind doing more on van der Weyden. Maybe we could do him as a separate oldies sometime??

I've been using biro myself a lot recently. I love the way it skims and rushes over the paper.

brianvds
12-07-2009, 07:30 AM
I think it is an excellent study, Brian. I wouldn't mind doing more on van der Weyden. Maybe we could do him as a separate oldies sometime??

An excellent idea!I love Van der Weyden's work. I am also completely and utterly in awe of it.

I've been using biro myself a lot recently. I love the way it skims and rushes over the paper.

Yes, it is truly an underestimated medium; pity it tends to fade over time, although apparently one does get lightfast ballpoints.

Now keep an eye on this thread, because I'm going to look up some links to sites with ballpoint art that will take your breath away. Will do so tomorrow or so, seeing as I am in a bit of a hurry at the moment and can't quite remember where I put those links...

artbyjune
12-07-2009, 08:08 AM
I use a waterproof, lightfast, non-fade ballpoint. It has a fairly fine point and so I need to look into finding thicker points, etc. At the moment, I use uniball by mitsubishi pencil co. in black. I also have some Pitt pens and some stabilo.

I am looking forward to viewing your links as I would like to learn more about ballpoint.

brianvds
12-07-2009, 11:17 AM
I use a waterproof, lightfast, non-fade ballpoint. It has a fairly fine point and so I need to look into finding thicker points, etc. At the moment, I use uniball by mitsubishi pencil co. in black. I also have some Pitt pens and some stabilo.

I am looking forward to viewing your links as I would like to learn more about ballpoint.
I have never seen fade-proof ballpoints around here, at least not ones with the slightly oily ink as you get in normal ballpoints, and that is what I like to work with.

Here are two links that might interest you. A collection of the work of various artists:

http://jerrystith.multiply.com/

And in much lighter mood, but no less skillful:

http://www.biro-art.com/

I am quite in awe of what some people at that first link can achieve, though I have to say I am not all that fond of photorealism with ballpoint - I prefer the Renaissance approach of shading with hatching and cross hatching. For this, I prefer a pen with a very thin point, giving a fine line.

One ends up with a drawing that is somewhere between silverpoint and etching in its appearance, and I like that very much.

Hmm, I just noticed that at that first link, one cannot see the larger sized images; there seems to be something wrong with their software. Perhaps you'll have better luck!

gakinme
12-10-2009, 05:26 PM
Beautiful face there, Brian. Very smooth rendering.

brianvds
12-10-2009, 09:23 PM
Beautiful face there, Brian. Very smooth rendering.

If you check out some of the work on the links I posted in my previous message, you'll see far more smooth renderings! I actually have no idea how the heck they do that. On the other hand, I sort of prefer this slightly rough, hatched look because it seems to me a more natural way to draw with so linear a medium. And one can still achieve a fairly smooth appearance, at least when viewed from a little distance.

artbyjune
12-11-2009, 08:30 AM
Brian, the first of your links doesn't connect up on my pc. Can you recheck the link? The second one links thru OK. I am looking at it now!! Fun site. Quirky!!:thumbsup: :clap:

brianvds
12-12-2009, 09:28 PM
Brian, the first of your links doesn't connect up on my pc. Can you recheck the link? The second one links thru OK. I am looking at it now!! Fun site. Quirky!!:thumbsup: :clap:

That link worked until a day or two ago. But in my experience it is a pretty twitchy site that. Try again in a few days!

Hmm, very weird. I just got it to work by first going to this page:

http://jerrystith.multiply.com/links/item/17

and then clicking on the "home" link. The guy who runs this site is pretty eccentric, and his site takes after the owner. ;-)