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LDianeJohnson
02-07-2001, 01:11 PM
VonOrloff asked me in the acrylic book forum page to
describe my traveling acrylic kit. I have many traveling setups. But
the following is my smallest, most efficient and convenient
arrangement to date:

<IMG SRC="http://www.ldianejohnson.com/WC/acrylics/acrylic_ptg_pack3.jpg" WIDTH=275 HEIGHT=504 ALIGN=bottom>

This is the kit packed. I use the Eagle Creek small pack. It is
just 20" high, has wheels and doubles as a backpack. There is
additional front zipping backpack attached which can't be seen well here
that I put my coat, umbrella, wipes, food bars, drinking water, and
business cards in. This bag is expensive but well worth it. It is
less than carry-on size so is easy to take on the airplane.

The inside contains my lap easel which can also be attached to the
tripod, pack chair, paints, brushes, paper palette, paper towels, plastic trash bags, mirror, spray bottle, water, etc. as you'll see below. You can also see the wood bracked I fashioned for paintings over 8x10 in size (shown is a 12x16 canvas).

<IMG SRC="http://www.ldianejohnson.com/WC/acrylics/acrylic_ptg_pack2.jpg" WIDTH=288 HEIGHT=450 ALIGN=bottom>

Here is everything opened up. Notice the white foamcore board in
the pack. Just behind it are 3 protected canvas'. The max size I can
carry is a 14x18. I use both prestretched canvas as well as masonite
boards I prepare.

<IMG SRC="http://www.ldianejohnson.com/WC/acrylics/acrylic_ptg_pack.jpg" WIDTH=280 HEIGHT=343 ALIGN=bottom>

Shown above with a painting in progress.

<IMG SRC="http://www.ldianejohnson.com/WC/acrylics/plein_air_canvas.jpg" WIDTH=350 HEIGHT=241 ALIGN=bottom>

For extended trips, I carry an adjustable plastic tube filled with
pre-cut, rolled canvas' with glassine sheets in between for
protection. I either tape the canvas on masonite boards (shown above)
or staple-gun the linen to stretcher bars. These suppllies are
carried in my regular suitcase and take up virtually no room. I normally
carry up to 16x20 canvas' on long trips. I will staple or tape as
many as three layers of the canvas on each board/stretcher. That way
I can do dozens of paintings on site, store in the tube, return home, and
restretch the paintings on new bars.

I also use an OpenM box, and a Savoir Faire easel setup if you'd
like to see those sometime as well.

Hope these tips help give you some ideas!

Diane

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L. Diane Johnson (http://www.LDianeJohnson.com/) NAPA, PSA
Plein Air Workshops (http://www.LDianeJohnson.com/workshops/)

[This message has been edited by Artistry (edited February 07, 2001).]

vonorloff
02-07-2001, 07:18 PM
Diane

This is just absolutely wonderful!
Thank you for putting so much effort into this.

I'm sure I and many others will benefit from this highly detailed and well thought out post. I'm going to re-read it several more times and study the pictures ...then I'm probably gonna have a few more questions for you about it, if that's ok.

Again, thanks for the extra effort ... it hasn't gone unnoticed.



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VonOrloff

"...all I thought of was making my colors sing, without paying any heed to rules and regulations"
Henri Matisse

vonorloff
02-07-2001, 10:00 PM
I also use an OpenM box, and a Savoir Faire easel setup if you'd
like to see those sometime as well.

Yes, I would like to see those also, please.
Thank you. This is great.



------------------
VonOrloff

"...all I thought of was making my colors sing, without paying any heed to rules and regulations"
Henri Matisse

LDianeJohnson
02-08-2001, 08:42 AM
VonOrloff,

I'm so glad this post was of help ! I hope you get some good ideas to try out, and even come up with some others too http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif

Sure, ask any questions regarding this. Happy to answer any I can.

Ok, I will post a couple of my other setups next week sometime.

Happy packing http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif

Diane

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L. Diane Johnson (http://www.LDianeJohnson.com/) NAPA, PSA
Plein Air Workshops (http://www.LDianeJohnson.com/workshops/)

Dima
02-08-2001, 03:41 PM
This looks all very clever Diane.
Your creativity seems to stretch way beyond the canvas.
Did you make the lap easel yourself and if so how?
Is the tripod a regular one for photographic purposes or something special?
I like to see these sort of things; very informative.

thanks for showing, Dick

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LDianeJohnson
02-08-2001, 03:52 PM
Hi Dick,

Yes, you are welcome to see how I created my little lap kit. Also made a very tiny one for watercolor, even though I do very little watercolor anymore. It is handy for a quick trip.

Heres the paint kit I made...easy and inexpensive to make:

Diane's Portable Paint Kit (http://www.ldianejohnson.com/paintkit.html)


[This message has been edited by Artistry (edited February 08, 2001).]

carly
02-08-2001, 09:42 PM
Diane, I really like the idea of the unstretched canvas and the board that you tape them to. This would save a lot of space when flying with finished paintings too.
Thanks too, for the effort in setting up the photo shots for this...great illustration.
carly

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"Everything is not art and Art is not everything, but it comes close."....carly

LDianeJohnson
02-08-2001, 09:53 PM
Hi Carly,

Thanks for your comments. I really have to give the credit for the rolled, pre-cut canvas to an artist I met a couple of years ago. The first tube I had was made from a thick mailing tube from OfficeDepot with a couple of large notebook rings and a shoulder strap from a discarded suitcase.

It really works great for me. Carrying flat prepared masonite boards are ideal, but so heavy if taking more than a few. You can pack some miscellaneous sized stretcher strips (in pairs of course http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/wink.gif in a suitcase along with the tube and assemble dozens on site.

LarrySeiler
02-09-2001, 06:18 AM
I'm learning to convert old wooden cigar boxes to pochade, or "paint sketch" boxes. Be nice to have one for my acrylics, and one for my oils.

Diane was helpful in suggesting some sites for the hardware to complete this little project. I have an El Greco half-box which is wonderful, made from mahoghany and good hardware, but...a small pochade box could be used right next to me in my van...a motel room, visiting and traveling where compact is necessary, etc; Visiting Scott in Georgia this spring, for example.

Here's a cool web site I picked up from a digest artist's group..where instructions are to build such a box, as well as wet painting carrier. http://people.ne.mediaone.net/jcle/index.html#pochade

I too looked at the Open Box...but, ah hem...nothing against quality but $300 was a bit more than I was looking to pay for one. My cigar box cost $6...and the hardware when all is said and done should total about a $15 investment.

Could easily be put and safe guarded in a suitcase, etc;

I do like the looks of Diane's box, and perhaps it might be time for me to consider how deserving my wife is of some perfumes and toiletries. (romantic gaze off into the distance) hee hee .... http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/biggrin.gif

Larry
http://www.artsmentor.org

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"Painting is easy when you don't know how, but very difficult when you do!" Edgar Degas

[This message has been edited by lseiler (edited February 09, 2001).]

tahlequah
02-09-2001, 07:43 AM
Hi Diane

Great Idea! I have two dumb questions.

How do you attach your box or lap easel to the tripod and also how do you attach the frame for larger paintings?

This outfit would sure save a lot of heavy totin' around of unnecessary "stuff".

Jo Anna

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Jo Anna

LDianeJohnson
02-09-2001, 08:40 AM
Hi Jo Anna,

In answer to your two questions (not dumb by the way http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/wink.gif

1. I can optionally attach the easel to my tripod using a 1/4-20 inside threaded sleeve inserted into a small block of wood. Then the block is attached to the bottom of the box using a screw going down from inside the box.

2. The wooden bracket I threw together with leftover pieces of small moulding and slats from an old venetian blind. It fits securely over the sides of the box without the need for any screws or clamps, and can fully fold flat (animations shown below.) Now that I have a prototype, my husband has promised to duplicate this for me in stronger materials. However, I've been traveling with this for over a year and it's done just great!

<IMG SRC="http://www.ldianejohnson.com/WC/acrylics/paintbox_bracket.gif" WIDTH=275 HEIGHT=241 ALIGN=bottom>

<IMG SRC="http://www.ldianejohnson.com/WC/acrylics/paintbox_bracket2.gif" WIDTH=275 HEIGHT=171 ALIGN=bottom>


Larry,

Thanks for posting the pochade Web page. That is a great little box! Can you tell me which place you finally found the correct hardware to complete yours?

Diane

[This message has been edited by Artistry (edited February 09, 2001).]

LarrySeiler
02-09-2001, 04:24 PM
I'll use Rockler.com for my tiny teeny weeny little brass lid hinges...

...I'm having a heck of a time though finding just the right lid support that might withstand the vigors of being upright, supporting a small painting. ITs got to screw to the side of the upper lid, and the side of the lower box...whereas most attach to the flush of the inside of the lid or bottom, or flush along one side. The cigar box is too thin for that. I'll figure it out though, and perhaps show mine off when finished!

Larry

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"Painting is easy when you don't know how, but very difficult when you do!" Edgar Degas

tahlequah
02-09-2001, 05:37 PM
Thanks Diane,
I showed your instructions for the box and frame to my husband. He's thinks he can make me a setup like this. Really do appreciate the tips!

Jo Anna

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Jo Anna

LDianeJohnson
02-10-2001, 08:55 AM
Jo Anna ,

You're welcome. Have fun creating your new little box together!

Diane

Sandra Nunes
02-10-2001, 01:46 PM
Diane,
Im not sure if I should be posting this here but I found this wonderful subject and I would like to ask you if you have a similar system to pack your pastels for travelling. I paint en plein air a lot but I never go too far from my house as Im developping my travelling pastel kit and didntt solve some problems yet.
Thanks in advance.
By the way, thanks a lot for your nice comments on my work in pastel forum.
rgds
Sandra Nunes

LDianeJohnson
02-10-2001, 08:05 PM
Dear Sandra,

There is a thread in the "Pastels" forum where we are discussing pastel boxes for studio as well as plein air painting. I will be posting a couple more of my traveling pastel setups within the next week or so. The thread page (if you have not already been there) is on the following page: http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/Forum11/HTML/000214.html

and the actual Web page where I am posting the pastel box setups is here:
http://www.ldianejohnson.com/WC/PastelBoxes/

Please check back periodically to both of these pages. I'll have something for you to see soon http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif Hopefully others WC members will send in more ideas too!

Diane

Sandra Nunes
02-12-2001, 08:41 AM
Thanks a lot Diane!
Ive checked the adresses above, it is a great idea to exchange such solutions! Ill be anxiously waiting for news.
rgds
Sandra

tahlequah
02-15-2001, 08:36 AM
Diane,

Got another question!

You paint acrylics on canvas that has been taped to masonite boards. Do you have any problems stretching the canvas onto stretchers later-like cracking, etc.?

Just curious. Sounds like a great way to carry your canvas, but I wanted to know if there are any problems I need to be aware of before I try this.

Your tips are really great! Thanks so much for getting this thread started.

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Jo Anna

LDianeJohnson
02-15-2001, 09:01 AM
Hi Jo Anna,

No, no problems with cracking after painting on the taped, prepared canvas' and remounting on stretcher bars. However, it helps when you are taping to the masonite board, that you gently wrap the corners against the pointed edges. Since you'll be stretching the canvas again later later, the it doesn't have to be stressed and real tight on the board.

I really like doing it this way as I can take more canvas than I otherwise could. It's a bit more work to restretch the paintings, but worth it. http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif

Also, just use a low-tack masking tape so as not to pull off the primer and cut the canvas 2" wider all around. You can always trim it later. So, for say a 16 x 20, cut the canvas to 20 x 24, etc.

Another little tip if you elect to precut canvas and tape to the boards for travel...I make patterns out of foamcore, one for my 9 x 12's, and all the other sizes I like, adding the the 2" allowance around. I roll out the canvas, lay down the pattern (on the back side of the canvas) and trace around in pencil making as many as I can from the roll. Then just cut with sissors or straight edge/xacto knife. After cutting, I write the size lightly with a pencil in the corner of the canvas so I never have to guess what I'm picking up.

Thanks for your kind comments. Glad you like the thread!

Diane

tahlequah
02-15-2001, 09:07 AM
Thanks Diane,

Hope this rain passes and some more nice spring-like weather comes back soon. I'm anxious to try this!

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Jo Anna

LDianeJohnson
02-15-2001, 09:20 AM
Jo Anna,

Yes, it's been rainy and dreary here too.

Have fun with the new setup. I hope it works for you. You may even discover a better way after trying it!

Waiting for Spring,

Diane