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Axl
09-06-2002, 01:47 PM
Having a little trouble on which forum I should post this in! I think I might just run a link to here through the Oils forum as well, and see if I can get a lot of help since I'm having a lot of trouble finding information about Modeling pastes and evil MORTAR in particular!

As I have, at the moment, I have complied a very basic overview based on the information I had managed to find about modeling pastes. I do not have any information about what modeling paste is actually made of although I would like to have some! If you know ANYTHING about its basic composition I would love to hear it!

Acrylic modeling pastes can be used to create a 3d field on a 2d plain. Almost similar to clay but much more liquid, it can be textured and shaped when it is wet. The compound, when dry, hardens to a rock-like substance which can then be carved. Although it is possible to tint the already usual white opaque color of the paste with acrylic paint, it is much more easily painted afterwards with acrylic, oils, watercolors, or used with many other mediums as well. The paste is desirable for creating Impasto effects to painting, or such things as relief maps or frames. It also can be mixed with different mediums and be used for Paper Mache.

First of all, other than the insert of information on its basic composition, is there anything else that should be said about general modeling pastes? Please let me know if you can think of anything or have any good information that the people should know!

Also, Mortar falls into the same category as this, however I am having a lot of troubles finding information about mortars. Does anyone know any basic background information about mortars? Maybe I'll ask Scott if he can lend me some links or something, because all I am finding is info about tile grout!

Thank you for your help!! It will be greatly appreciated!

timelady
09-06-2002, 04:30 PM
I'll have a look when I go into the studio tomorrow but I believe that the texture in many modelling pastes comes from whiting (chalk, essentially). The rest of the composition is pretty much acrylic polymer emulsion of some sort (like PVA glue). I also have one paste that has pumice stone in it.

Try a search on Golden's website (if they have one) as they have the largest range of acrylic pastes and mediums that I know of.

Will post more if there's more info on my jars at work...
Tina.

timelady
09-06-2002, 04:38 PM
Link to Golden's molding paste tech sheet:
http://www.goldenpaints.com/moldpast.htm

It appears that the filler is marble dust. The lightweight one uses "microscopic air bubbles" instead of marble dust (and the stuff is fantastic I can tell you!). Gels use polymer solids.

And the link to the general tech list:
http://www.goldenpaints.com/tech.htm

Tina.

puzzlinon
09-06-2002, 04:57 PM
The lightweight one uses "microscopic air bubbles"


Like painting with whipped cream ;-)


Anyways, a couple of edits in the description paragraph:

2d <strike>plain</strike> plane (although the idea of using paint to make crop circles is appealing)

is <strike>almost</strike> similar

(similar = almost the same)...

Keith Russell
09-06-2002, 05:09 PM
Greetings:

The large planet in my painting Starlight, Starbright was 'sculpted' with modeling paste using a palette knife. I mixed a light blue paint with the paste, then applied it.

When it was partially dry, I airbrushed highlights and shadows onto it, then removed the frisket, preserving the round shape before it completely dried.

www.syntheticsky.com

(Look in the 'gallery' section, of course.)

Keith.

Axl
09-06-2002, 09:43 PM
Alright, Thankyou for the links and the help! I will go and research now and come back with the changed descriptions. Thanx! :D

Axl
09-06-2002, 10:10 PM
Keith:
After all of your work in editing my other acrylic descriptions and pointing out to me that Mediums should be Media, I thought it was hilarious when I read this on the Golden web site that Tina provided:

"They dry to an opaque, semi-gloss film to which subsequent layers of acrylic paint and mediums can be applied."

lol

Axl
09-06-2002, 10:26 PM
okay, all goofing aside, I've come up with the latest attempt at a description. Tell me what you think/what should be changed or added..blah blah blah :D

Also, We have been wondering what really is the difference between Modeling pastes and Mortars. Are they essentially the same thing? is mortars just another fancy name for modeling paste?

Acrylic modeling pastes can be used to create a 3d field on a 2d plane. Similar to clay but much more liquid, it can be textured and shaped when it is wet. The compound, when dry, hardens to a rock-like substance which can then be carved or sanded.
The paste is water-based, formulated with 100% acrylic polymer emulsions which give it great flexibility and durability. The texture is created by a filler of marble dust, usually. Pastes are available in a variety of different weights. The lightest pastes usually replace the traditional filler with microscopic air bubbles to give it the consistency of cake icing. For very heavy pastes, the normal molding paste is usually combined with a gel of polymer solids.
Although it is possible to tint the already white opaque color of the paste with acrylic paint, it is much more easily painted afterwards with acrylic, oils, watercolors, or used with many other media as well. The paste works well for creating Impasto effects, relief maps or frames. It also can be mixed with different media and be used for Paper Mache.

Gonna go get ready to make crop circles now :D

Dave Carter
09-07-2002, 08:46 AM
Watercolors? I suppose if it a very thick application, but normally watercolor paint will not bond well to acrylic.

Modeling pastes and gels are very useful for; waves, waterfalls, icicles, clouds, fur and hair in my experience.

snuffy
09-07-2002, 09:47 AM
ax - part of the confusion comes from the filler in modelling paste. Some say chalk and others say granite. In fact, it is granite. It has the same chemical nature as chalk, calcium carbonate, but, as you know, chalk is quite different from granite. After it is dry, it can be drilled, sanded, or carved. For best results, limit the maximum depth in one application to 1/4 inch. Let the first coat dry completely before building up additional layers. I have no knowledge or experience with the version that uses air bubbles. btw, polymers have also been used to modify (increase) the strength of concrete.

Dima
09-07-2002, 04:34 PM
Hello Axl,

Your latest description makes it look as if the Golden light-weight stuff with its whipped egg consistancy would be the only light-weight paste available. This is not the case; Lascaux have a great light-weight paste where you won't see any bubbles on the surface. It is sturdy and sandable and goes by the name of Structura.
See: http://www.lascaux.ch/english/malhilfen/index.html

Axl
09-07-2002, 05:05 PM
Thankyou for taking the time to reply, everyone :) Unfortunately, it seams this project has proven to be too much for me so I will no longer be doing these descriptions.... Thankyou very much for your feedback and help. For someone who normally uses graphite, charcoal, and playing with mediums I have definately learned a lot.

papadog55
09-07-2002, 08:01 PM
i have been interested about the same thing. i have had several good suggestions sent to me. one was bondo,plaster base,hot glue gun glue,epoxy that has been thickened with fillers of many different types,and synthetic stucco mix. maybe one of theses might give you the look you want.

ramjo
09-08-2002, 12:33 AM
To use modeling paste for creating texture on acrylic painting. I use it with pallete knife to apply on the canvas.

_________

--Ramjo:)