PDA

View Full Version : Join us- October 's- cafe Michelangelo


artbyjune
10-01-2009, 05:32 AM
:wave: Hi all. Welcome to Hallowe'en month!!

What's going on in your art and life? Share any of your experiences with us.

I was cleaning up my old files this week and came across a copy of Leonardo's 'woman with an ermine' which I copied in oils a few years ago. I had thrown it in the bottom of a box in disgust since it looked NOTHING like the original. I got a nice surprise when I took it out...because altho not very like the Leonardo--it looked quite good. So I framed it and put it on my wall.

:heart:

artbyjune
10-01-2009, 05:36 AM
Projects this month;-


9. October 09

9.1. Photo paint along (azulparsnip)

9.2. Once upon a time (Gakinme - Bill Peet)

9.3. Oldies & Goodies (Trafford- Suzanne Valadon;then azulparsnip-)

9.4. Art movements (artbyjune-Naive art)

9.5. Free topic (Trafford- Hallowe'en party)

trafford
10-03-2009, 07:31 AM
June, when you see a painting/drawing standing on its own after some time, it is always better.

October. It's getting colder here, and I dread turning on the heat, it's so expensive. Other than that, I love this weather and it is soup time. :clap:
Soup, soup...beautiful soup. I've been storing up recipes and want to have one soup night a week, with wonderful bread and butter (there goes the waist line AGAIN!)

Just finished watching the Ken Burn's National Park series. Amazing how little I knew on the subject, so it was a learning experience besides a beautiful visual one.

Will try to get a drawing done every day this winter..and improve my skills. This seems to be my constant resolution.

Have a nice weekend-Janet :heart:

azulparsnip
10-04-2009, 07:44 AM
Hi all, yes the cold weather is soup weather....warms me up just thinking about it.
Janet, I like your soup a week idea. If you come up on something real good please share the recipe. We had matzo ball soup for the first time last week. Good, quick and simple, if you have the matzo mix that is.

We are all about getting the heater in this week. Andy got the pipe thru the wall and is hoping to get on with laying the tile on the floor today.

Drawing every day has been a long standing goal of mine. Still striving toward it...maybe start keeping a hash mark page. One thing I started last year was putingg 25 cents in a piggy bank every day I did some art. Then I used that $ for art supplies. in Centive worked pretty good.

Sounds like that oil stood the supreme test ....very gratifying. Congratulations.

artbyjune
10-04-2009, 05:41 PM
I agree...the soup idea is good. Soup and winter go together. Anyone got a recipe for pumpkin soup? Maybe it could be posted in the Hallowe'en project. I once had a bowl of pumpkin soup in Sydney and it was sooooo delicious.

I rather like celery soup as its a good way of using up old limp celery!!

Marigold
10-05-2009, 04:42 AM
Are any of you as frustrated as I am with the little daylight painting time we get now? I can paint now on weekends only - During the week after work, it is dark. I have no decent lamp that does not falsify the colors. So all I can do in weeknights are drawings or underpainting. Also, I am getting moody when I have no daylight. And the winter has only just begun. Maybe soup will help (with the mood, not the light).

Susanne

trafford
10-05-2009, 07:25 AM
Here is a fun soup web site to read on those dark evenings

http://www.soupsong.com/iinterna.html

azulparsnip
10-05-2009, 08:13 AM
LOL about soup helping............yes, it is hard to paint in the dark:) You could try a full spectrum light bulb. I find it sufficient. I rarely get daytime to do art. Marigold, my daughter got to Germany this march on the airforce base. She says it is cold

Marigold
10-05-2009, 08:16 AM
Colder than NC - sure. But I have lived near Philadelphia for three years, and the weather was not much different from here. How long will your daughter stay?

Will go shopping for a lightbulb today.
Will make pumpkin soup on Friday.

Susanne

azulparsnip
10-06-2009, 11:56 PM
let us know how the bulb works for you. pumpkin soup sounds real good.
the Airforce base terms are around 2 to 3 years.

azulparsnip
10-08-2009, 06:58 AM
Been a busy two days, we are preparing for a reroofing Saturday. Weather is putting a damper on things but we may just proceed anyway.

Off to work, hope to get some naive down the 20 minutes I have between dropping Rose at school and work time.

Have a good day all. May pick up a pencil or (oh joy) a paint brush.

azulparsnip
10-12-2009, 12:48 PM
a little something I did from a magazine photo - I think this is Michael Jordan judging from one of the rings.

ryster007
10-13-2009, 07:09 PM
Nice drawing Robin!- good character.

Yeah the impending dark winter will be pretty depressing. Light here is also bad :( I tried a daylight bulb last year which massively improved the colour mixing issues but didn't last long and gave me a bit of a headache!:crying:

Soup must be the answer- carrot an corriander?:p

Here's a protrait I just finished. It was from the Portraiure Forum's monthly challenge

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Oct-2009/83841-Roland.JPG

Roland
Acrlyic on canvas
16x20 inches

brianvds
10-13-2009, 10:42 PM
Here in the southern regions of Dark Africa it is already quite thoroughly summer, and mostly hot as Hades. Or at least as hot as the less respectable bits of Hades. I wish I could import some of Vancouver's or Amsterdam's weather.

Halloween is not really very big here, although some people do keep the tradition, and you sometimes see kids taken trick-or-treating, especially in the bigger cities which are more under the influence of American culture. Some restaurants, especially ones catering to younger people, also put on Halloween themed evenings.

It's a tradition I rather like, and I have for ages been trying to get my circle of friends into doing a real Halloween party, with jack-o'-lanterns and all. In my native tongue, they are known as "pampoenspoke" (literally, "pumpkin ghosts") but I have never seen those huge orange pumpkins that they are carved from in America around here, at least not in the beginning of summer. And for some reason, year after year, after showing some initial enthusiasm, something always happens that puts an end to my Halloween party plans.

So I guess instead of having a party I'll just continue my mostly unsuccessful attempts to produce even marginally nice art... ;-)

trafford
10-14-2009, 07:10 AM
Brian, you're hot and I woke up this morning freezing and finally had to turn a litle bit of heat on :lol:

I'm sorry you can't whip up a little more enthusiasm for a Halloween Party. Seems to me people would enjoy dressing up as ghosts and goblins. Ah well, you'll just have to paint a few pumpkins.

I did look in at your journal and I think your drawings are really good. Enjoyed the photos too, as I know so little about Pretoria. Looks like a beautiful place.

Am crazy about that word pampoenspoke :cool:

brianvds
10-14-2009, 10:54 PM
Brian, you're hot and I woke up this morning freezing and finally had to turn a litle bit of heat on :lol:
Well, here I sit at about five in the morning (I tend to wake up in the early hours of the morning, and then I go check my mail and WC), with the doors open to allow a bit of a breeze to move through. It is pleasantly cool, but the weather man said we'll have another hot day today. This time of year is always like that: still too early to expect significant summer rain, and sweltering.

I'm sorry you can't whip up a little more enthusiasm for a Halloween Party. Seems to me people would enjoy dressing up as ghosts and goblins.
That's what I would also think! Or at least then just do the barbecue thing, perhaps with a pampoenspook next to the fire. ;-)

I did look in at your journal and I think your drawings are really good. Enjoyed the photos too, as I know so little about Pretoria. Looks like a beautiful place.
Thanks for the vote of confidence: I tend to passionately hate everything I draw! ;-)
As for Pretoria, it is dirty, ugly and with virtually no cultural life of any kind. I'm getting outta here as soon as I can.

We do sometimes have spectacular thunderstorms though (you probably saw the photos of storm clouds on my blog?), and that does help to liven things up: last summer our neighbour had his chimney knocked to pieces by lightning, and I got to see lightning hit another house's roof in a shower of sparks. Who needs scary Halloween movies? ;-)

But I think I should emigrate to Western Cape province, which is picturesque and seemingly made specially to be painted...

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Oct-2009/142294-west3.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Oct-2009/142294-west7.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Oct-2009/142294-west9.jpg

I took these photos some years ago on a holiday trip down there. The middle photo shows Cape Town's famous Table Mountain from the back. Whenever Pretoria gets to much for me, I look at these photos and promise myself: one day, one day... ;-)

Am crazy about that word pampoenspoke :cool:
Well, spread it around, and perhaps it will be taken up into English vocabulary. I'd be so proud. ;-)

azulparsnip
10-16-2009, 12:48 AM
Brian - your live journal blog is good.....Could we use some of those photos in a photo paint along?

brianvds
10-16-2009, 08:03 AM
Brian - your live journal blog is good.....Could we use some of those photos in a photo paint along?

You are welcome: whatever I put on the web I consider to be in the public domain and anyone can use it for whatever purpose without asking any permission or worrying about copyright issues.

trafford
10-16-2009, 08:15 AM
Brian, I'm sorry Pretoria is so dismal...such a pretty name too. What about that Euphorbia tree? Really wild looking. I see what Robin means. That would be great to paint. :)

brianvds
10-16-2009, 10:11 PM
Brian, I'm sorry Pretoria is so dismal...such a pretty name too. What about that Euphorbia tree? Really wild looking. I see what Robin means. That would be great to paint. :)
It's just this time of year: swelteringly hot, everyone on edge, and in the end I just want to run and go hide in a freezer somewhere. ;-)

Now I wonder which Euphorbia you are referring to. I can't remember having put a photo of one online anywhere. In fact, looking through my blog I see almost no paintable photos. Are we talking about the same website? I should go visit my won blog more often, it seems! ;-)

Update: Ah, now I see! I had all forgotten about that post! Anyway, as I said before, everyone is most welcome to use any photos there for reference. I'd be curious to see everyone's take on the Euphorbia: as I mention in the post, they are quite aggressive trees, and thus perhaps suitable for a Halloween thread. ;-)

azulparsnip
10-22-2009, 10:02 PM
Here is my art corner...... see June, I enjoy your art everyday :heart:

trafford
10-23-2009, 06:23 AM
It's a neat little space Robin, and I like that window to dream out of.

I use a dining room table with a few rolling files and lots of boxes holding supplies underneath. Have a porch in the summer, but it gets too hot. Will take a picture of my space when I can. I love to see where artists work. :heart:

artbyjune
10-24-2009, 05:48 AM
I think your art corner looks really cosy, Robin. My art area is a real mess. I would need to tidy up.... to take a photo!! Maybe later!:D

How lovely to see those 2 drawings of mine on your wall:thumbsup: I haven't done any in that style for ages. I like to do them watching TV in winter.

azulparsnip
10-26-2009, 01:12 PM
Well, today is an off work/at home day... the weather is beautiful .and I'm painting cabinets again......sigh........getting the underlayer grey on and then, oooooooh .......on with the carmine red. Rather daring.
I suppose Janet is noodling about reading stuff she's checked out from the library.......got any bonbons close at hand, Jan???
And June I expect is paving another jungle with blue and orange for those lemurs and natives.
Sandra, I know you started a new job. Hope you catch a few moments with the brush
Brian, it's is nice you can sketch now and then at work. My gerieactric friend gets a tinsy jealous if I'm not paying astute attention while he naps.... But really he is a most gracious, sensitive person....a rare breed.
Have a good day everyone. My lunch break is over......back to the cabinets.:wave:

brianvds
10-26-2009, 10:05 PM
Brian, it's is nice you can sketch now and then at work.:wave:

Well, I have to get SOMETHING out of the job! I work as technician in a medical lab, and more specifically, I work night shifts. Every second week I work from 6pm to 6am, for seven days on end, by the end of which I feel like I'm packed in cotton wool or something. But some evenings things quiet down nicely, and then I can put up reference material on the computer screen and sketch a bit. Of course, you know how it works: just when I'm getting into it I get interrupted! Still, it does help to keep my eye practiced, and to suppress the the terrible drawing withdrawal symptoms. ;-)

azulparsnip
10-29-2009, 02:43 PM
you're creative writing skills are good too, Brian.....Brian packed in cotton...humm, interesting but effective description.......yes, those drawing withdrawal symptoms are despicable.......where you make a mark on a blank sheet and your inner critic launches ....

azulparsnip
10-29-2009, 02:50 PM
Here's a doodle in my journal - may do a lino of this

Gotta scram.....bake some cookies and maybe horn in on the computer and do a little after Vingee-LeBrunn ....later, ya'll

brianvds
10-29-2009, 10:19 PM
you're creative writing skills are good too, Brian.....Brian packed in cotton...humm, interesting but effective description.......yes, those drawing withdrawal symptoms are despicable.......where you make a mark on a blank sheet and your inner critic launches ....

Hehehe, perhaps I should start planning what I'm going to do with all the money for that Nobel Prize in literature... ;-)

It's actually kind of difficult to describe what it is like to work such night shifts. They sure cause a strange shift in one's perceptions, and they are utterly exhausting. But on the positive side, after seven days of work, I get seven days off again, so for the moment the whole thing suits me.

Now as for the creative writing, it is one of my hobbies: for the past few years I have written stories as Christmas gifts for my brother's children, instead of buying some mass-produced plastic item. It's both cheaper and more personal, I think. This year's story is already complete, but this time round I have decided to try illustrating it as well, which is a whole new challenge. Writing is easy compared to art, and considering that English is my second language, this tells you something about just how difficult I find art!

brianvds
10-29-2009, 10:24 PM
Here's a doodle in my journal - may do a lino of this

Gotta scram.....bake some cookies and maybe horn in on the computer and do a little after Vingee-LeBrunn ....later, ya'll

Neat! As I mentioned somewhere else, I used to do lots of such doodles. And as a kid I was drawing all the time. I am now trying to relearn this sort of spontaneity. Not sure how I ended up losing it and becoming so inhibited.

azulparsnip
10-30-2009, 12:47 AM
Wow, Brian that is so cool ....a story with illustrations as gifts.....that takes alot of forethought and time........but using your talents and not keeping them is what it's all about. Art is a part of a full life and giving it to others helps them live.......I believe

artbyjune
10-30-2009, 02:47 AM
Love the doodle Robin.

Brian, an illustrated story for a present...marvellous!

brianvds
10-30-2009, 03:59 AM
Love the doodle Robin.

Brian, an illustrated story for a present...marvellous!

Well, I would hope so: illustration is far more difficult than 'fine art,' because you can't just copy things; you have to invent them. I always wonder why people talk about "mere" illustration, as if it is somehow a lower form of art. It seems to me like it is often a much higher form of art, that requires far more technical competence and creativity than most of so-called "fine art."

artbyjune
10-30-2009, 02:03 PM
I think you have a good point there in regards to illustrations, Brian. It does exercise more imagination than a mere copying of what is in front of you.

They are 2 different strands of art. No point in comparing one to the other in order to belittle one or the other, I think. Rather see them for their own merits.

I saw a quote this morning on the subject...I'll go see if I can find it as I saved it somewhere...

"An illustrational form," said Francis Bacon, "tells you through the intelligence immediately what the form is about, whereas a non-illustrational form works first upon sensation and then slowly leaks back into the fact."


Haven't a link to the original source unfortunately...it was whilst browsing the web around 6 am.;)

gakinme
10-30-2009, 05:55 PM
I'm here finally at a chat thread - on the second last day of the month.:D

I've started a new job a week ago and am still in training but it's tiring enough that I didn't draw much this week. (My best piece this week was my daughter's portrait (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showpost.php?p=8247531&postcount=183) and my lovebirds (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showpost.php?p=8252626&postcount=191) and my lizard (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showpost.php?p=8253162&postcount=192).) I haven't worked full time for 15 years and my last part time job was 7 years ago. So it takes a while to get used to working five days a week again.

I haven't abandoned the Non-Western Culture thread. I've even borrowed a book on African sculptures so I could draw some of them, or use play dough to form some of them.

Brian, I saw your comment on your botantical pieces sold at art shop. I should try it with my Chinese pieces. I saw at my local supermarket some Chinese cards by a Chinese, but not landscape. Just a few blades and a character or so and it's $3.50 per piece. I wonder how much she gets to take home. That's not a lot if you consider the cost of materials - paper, plastic sleeve, envelop and time involved. I now live in a town that is very art and music geared. Galleries, shops, everywhere has artwork for sale $100 up of all types. With this recession, I wonder if anyone even buys art.

That sunset photo at your blog is very pretty, Brian. Pls post it for December photo paint along. The landscape pieces are pretty too. Very dramatic drops. Would have been perfect for Rita Angus style.

Hello to Robin, Chris, June and Janet and anyone passing through.

brianvds
10-30-2009, 10:09 PM
I'm here finally at a chat thread - on the second last day of the month.:D

I've started a new job a week ago and am still in training but it's tiring enough that I didn't draw much this week. (My best piece this week was my daughter's portrait (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showpost.php?p=8247531&postcount=183) and my lovebirds (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showpost.php?p=8252626&postcount=191) and my lizard (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showpost.php?p=8253162&postcount=192).) I haven't worked full time for 15 years and my last part time job was 7 years ago. So it takes a while to get used to working five days a week again.

Sorry to hear you have to work again. Or glad for you if it is in fact what you wanted!

I like your pictures. That lizard might fit in well in the Halloween thread... ;-)

I haven't abandoned the Non-Western Culture thread. I've even borrowed a book on African sculptures so I could draw some of them, or use play dough to form some of them.

I'm thinking of trying my hand at some prehistoric cave art when I have time. But of course with modern materials? Or perhaps I should make a point of painting some on rocks, using only whatever materials I can get hold of in nature, and see how it goes. Charcoal for black, and perhaps white ashes for white, are easy enough to get hold of, and one can find both yellow and red ochers in the wilds here if you look round a bit.

This being southern Africa, I should perhaps try out the style of the Bushmen, who were the first indigenous people here, and left a huge legacy of rock paintings stretching back from prehistoric times to a century or two ago:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Oct-2009/142294-bushman_eland.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Oct-2009/142294-bushman_painting2.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Oct-2009/142294-bushman-eland2.jpg

There are nowadays artists here who paint in a sort of fake Bushman style. I have even considered doing so myself, but somehow it just feels, well, fake. Perhaps if I do so from direct observation and using natural materials it might be different, but nowadays, eland are scarce outside of game reserves! ;-)

Brian, I saw your comment on your botantical pieces sold at art shop. I should try it with my Chinese pieces. I saw at my local supermarket some Chinese cards by a Chinese, but not landscape. Just a few blades and a character or so and it's $3.50 per piece. I wonder how much she gets to take home. That's not a lot if you consider the cost of materials - paper, plastic sleeve, envelop and time involved.

Well, do go try it out and let us know how it went. I would love to drive the printed card companies into bankruptcy, and we can do so if we all started producing cheap handmade cards. :evil:

For me, it is a neat way to sell what is in effect student work; I wouldn't dream of selling those pictures as fine art. But cards are great fun, because you don't really have to work in any particular style. For greeting cards, anything goes, and somewhat roughly done pictures can even actually work better than highly refined ones.

It takes me perhaps half an hour or forty minutes to produce something like this:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Oct-2009/142294-183-8341_IMG.JPG

It's about 10 cm high, and for these small cards I don't even include an envelope, otherwise it costs too much. But I also produce somewhat larger ones like this:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Oct-2009/142294-182-8264_IMG.JPG

This one's about 15cm high. For these I take a bit more time and I include a cheap envelope, but I still don't try to create great masterpieces, and the larger ones I can sell for a bit more.

Not really a way to make more than pocket money, but it's great fun and a confidence booster, and you learn a great deal about painting if you make lots of quick, small sketches like these.

I now live in a town that is very art and music geared. Galleries, shops, everywhere has artwork for sale $100 up of all types. With this recession, I wonder if anyone even buys art.

Hehehe, I have wondered that same thing: if art is so popular a hobby, perhaps everyone will just make their own and never buy anything. On the other hand, it might create a public enthusiasm and appreciation for art that would otherwise not exist. In Victorian Britain just about all educated people could draw quite well, but there was still a very lively art market, perhaps precisely because everyone was attuned to art. It does cause us common mortals one problem though, namely that it raises the standard: if everyone can draw and paint decently, they'll only buy art that is much better than what they can do themselves, so that makes it difficult to get into the market.

In 17th century Netherlands, even very famous artists sometimes lived in poverty (like Rembrandt and Hals) and others had to do a 'day job' and painted on the side (like Vermeer), and this happened partly because the art market there first boomed, and then every Tom, Dick and Harry became an artist, which hugely increased the competition.

artbyjune
10-31-2009, 02:15 AM
I wonder why art and artists are so undervalued in society given that great art is often/sometimes cited as the highest spiritual pinnacle of mankind's achievement. Can true great art only be achieved in dire poverty!!:p :rolleyes:

Gakinme, congrats on the new job. I hope it is the kind of work you like doing!!

gakinme
10-31-2009, 02:39 AM
Brian, exactly. If everyone could do art, they don't need to buy art unless it's exceptional art. Then we have to be really very good to make a sale.

Thank you, June. I'm sort of the assistant to the owner of a motel at the moment, and when their family goes on vacation, I'd be stepping in her shoes. Considering such a poor job market, I'm lucky to even get a job after such a long absence from the job market and to be able to work so many days a week. I'm not complaining. In 2 weeks, i get a final interview with the sheriff's office doing a totally different job. We'll see how that shakes out. It's a full time job with loaded benefits. Can't beat that.

trafford
10-31-2009, 06:02 AM
Good luck Sandra. We will keep the home fires burning at Non Western Cultures...a thread I'm sure will go on a long time. I know you have to draw...and I don't think a full time job will stop you.

Brian, the greeting card business is probably not doing too well, after all, you can send a non personal card via E-mail. Maybe it is time for something a little bit special for the few cards that people actually buy. Many years ago I worked for a greeting card company proof reading the names printed in the boxed cards. We'd always grab one of the cards if it was a celebrity. I think I have a Lucille and Desi Arnez around here somewhere. :cool: