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artbyjune
09-30-2009, 07:36 AM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Sep-2009/106623-Rousseau_theRepastOfTheLion.jpg

I have always loved the art of Henri Rousseau, partly because it depicts wild animals in jungles, and partly because of his imaginative style. He is probably the most famous of the 'naive' artists.

I hope you will join us this month studying the work of naive artists.


Practical work

As usual, you can do paintings/drawings in the style of, or inspired by the artists you study. Or you can make direct copies of those paintings made by artists RIP before 1939.

Looking forward to seeing your artworks.

Please post any links you think would interest us on the subject!!:thumbsup:

..................................................................................................




One definition of naive art from the web is:

that it is....
the work of artists in sophisticated societies who lack... or reject..... conventional expertise in the representation or depiction of real objects. The naïve creates with the same passion as the trained artist but without the latter’s formal knowledge of methods.

Naïve artists are not to be confused with hobbyists, or “Sunday painters,” who paint for fun.

Naive artists have a unique vision that is natural to them. (There are also artists termed as ‘faux naives’, who are trained but adopt a naive style. )

Characteristics of naive art

Paint using imagination. Ignore ‘rules’ of perspective. Use colour inventively, some might say unrefined way (as far as colour theory goes etc). True naive art is often thought of as ‘charming’.


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Some general links

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Na%C3%AFve_art (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Na%C3%AFve_art)

http://www.britishnaives.co.uk/Established-Artists_s-170_cg-72_ma-72.html (http://www.britishnaives.co.uk/Established-Artists_s-170_cg-72_ma-72.html)


http://www.outsiderart.co.uk/naive.htm (http://www.outsiderart.co.uk/naive.htm)


:thumbsup:


:heart:

artbyjune
09-30-2009, 07:40 AM
European artists

H. Rousseau

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henri_Rousseau

http://www.henrirousseau.org/

for exotic jungle scenes

USA

Grandma Moses

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grandma_Moses

http://www.gseart.com/moses.html


for rural/ farm scenes



UK

Alfred Wallis

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_Wallis

http://www.tate.org.uk/servlet/ArtistWorks?cgroupid=999999961&artistid=577&page=1


for marine scenes.


Happy painting!!:clap: :clap:

gakinme
09-30-2009, 09:34 AM
Ooh, thank you, June, for this one. Good! He's pretty dead and I could copy his work. LOL.

At first, I thought it was a photo paint along of jungle thread. This is even better. I love vibrant pieces. I'll look through his links later today. Very excited about it.

trafford
09-30-2009, 12:05 PM
We are terrible hoping all these artists died before 1938. I keep doing it "Oh, darn...he died in 1945" or "What! he's still alive. He's got to be ninety" :lol:

This is going to be such a wonderful thread. I can just see you June in the jungle there, with your sketch book. :heart:

LGHumphrey
09-30-2009, 03:05 PM
This is after a selfportrait that Rousseau did, and yes, it's just a bit naif, don't you think?

He took his paintings seriously, though no one else did. He thought that he, with his "realistic" paintings, and Picasso, with his "Egyptian" paintings, were the true artists in Paris in those days.

Fernande Olivier mentions how an artist picked up a Rousseau in a flea market for 5 francs, the price of the canvas. It was not unknown for an artist to buy one of Rousseau's works at a knock-down price and paint something else on top of it.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Sep-2009/60616-P1040103.JPG

gakinme
09-30-2009, 05:21 PM
Lawrence, that is such a close resemblance to his real self portrait. Poor guy, his work was ignored. Wow, if I could pick up a jungle piece like his for $5, I'd be very happy.

June, I notice from the last general link you put in.

http://www.outsiderart.co.uk/naive.htm

Not only does it have Stephen Wilshire in with his black and white cityscape,

http://www.outsiderart.co.uk/wiltshire.htm

It has another artist that strikes my fancy even more than Rousseau's.

This guy Eric Jiani. Not only it is colorful, it has surreal stuff in it. I'm going to invent a scene along those lines.

http://www.outsiderart.co.uk/jiani.htm

azulparsnip
09-30-2009, 11:42 PM
Hi Lawrence, Janet, Jane and Sandra - Naive art - Rousseau was my favorite artist a long time ago. The lion sniffing the sleeper is a favorite. I really need to stop copying directly so much and the naive art will be a good jumping off spot.

Lawrence, I recognized your painting style right away. Love those colors too.

artbyjune
10-01-2009, 05:42 AM
Hi Lawrence. You are quick off the mark!! I love that Rousseau self portrait. I like your bright clean colours in this copy.:thumbsup:

Its amazing to think Rousseau was ridiculed in his time and yet now lots of artists incorporate many of his stylistic aspects.

I love that lion sniffing the sleeper too Robin. I might do a direct copy of part of a naive painting by Rousseau but I mostly want to do something of my own in the style of.... or intribute to.;)

artbyjune
10-01-2009, 05:45 AM
Sandra, Jiani looks interesting. I like his sea scene. It is a great excuse to invent your own world.

eyepaint
10-02-2009, 12:55 AM
Yay! Love the bold colours and jungle scenes.

Lawrence - you're so quick. Love the mustache.

LGHumphrey
10-02-2009, 01:33 PM
Hi June, hi EP, not actually all that fast, I painted that one almost a month ago. Telepathy, that's what it is, telepathy. :)

azulparsnip
10-04-2009, 07:49 AM
here are three attempts but I am still not getting the right look.....too much perspective I think

1 - poke berries 25 minutes
2 - trees 25 minutes
3 - kitchen thru doorway - 40 minutes

gakinme
10-04-2009, 11:39 AM
The jungle piece looks near enough, Robin. I'll do a jungle piece in a bit to join you.

artbyjune
10-04-2009, 05:37 PM
I think the kitchen looks 'naive' in style, Robin! Especially the floor boards.

Perhaps it would be easier to get rid of perspective if you paint your scene from memory. Funny, we spend a long time trying to get perspective 'right'. How nice to just throw it out the window, so to speak, for a naive painting style!!

gakinme
10-04-2009, 10:10 PM
One piece in soft pastel using up the ruined piece of Strathmore Gray Paper with india ink.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/04-Oct-2009/86669-sp_monster.jpg

azulparsnip
10-05-2009, 08:20 AM
Fun piece Sandra, I like it
Yes, June drawing from memory would be the nudge I need toward not copying everything.

gakinme
10-07-2009, 09:53 AM
Thank you, Robin, for your comment.

LGHumphrey
10-08-2009, 02:46 PM
Sign in a restaurant: "If you think our waiters are rude you should see the manager." :lol:

So.....if you think THIS looks naif you should see the original. :lol:

This is after Rousseau's "Boy On Rocks."

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Oct-2009/60616-P1040183.JPG

gakinme
10-08-2009, 08:44 PM
Hahaha..good comparison. Nice one, Lawrence. You made him stand in a cluster of emeralds instead of rocks. Even more precious. Good resemblance.

LGHumphrey
10-09-2009, 05:07 PM
Another Rousseau, after his portrait of the French writer Pierre Loti.

Vincent van Gogh mentions Loti many times in his letters, especially Loti's "Madame Chrysanthème (precursor of the opera "Madame Butterfly) and it's from that novel that Vincent got the title for his famous painting "La Mousmé."

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Oct-2009/60616-P1040186.JPG

azulparsnip
10-09-2009, 08:47 PM
Lawrence, both of those are really fun. It is habit forming , this style.

Here is one of my own ........30 minutes, colored pencil

trafford
10-10-2009, 07:05 AM
Always like your work LG....My favorite this time is "Boy on Rocks", very naive.

Sandra, interesting cityscape. Why do I see something menacing in the middle or has my brain gone Halloween? :)

Robin, you could make a doorstop look good. Love your tree and strangely shaped house.

It is hard to do naive, even though my perspective is usually nothing to brag about. Got to get started on these projects before the month rolls away. :heart:

gakinme
10-10-2009, 11:20 AM
Lawrence, you're on a roll! Good for you. You know, I actually like the colors you give your paintings. It suits the subject so much better because they are livelier and more light hearted.

Robin, a menacing looking tree that attempts to shake up the foundation of the house that doesn't look like it might last for long? Hahaha...very cute.

Thank you, Janet, for your comment. Yep, the city is under attack.

LGHumphrey
10-10-2009, 05:20 PM
Thanks for your comments gakinme, azul, and trafford.

gakinme, I always thought that poor kid was sitting down on a rather dangerous pointed rock, but maybe he IS standing.

Spent the whole day at my sister-in-law's place so couldn't do an oil painting but did manage to do this rather naive pastel sketch of one of her ornaments.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/10-Oct-2009/60616-P1040192.JPG

WildGoose
10-10-2009, 05:44 PM
LGH-
Boy on the Rocks does just that - rocks!:thumbsup:
Sandra-
Nice flatness acheived, I"m also with Trafford on seeing it as a tad on the darkside...but attacked...zowie...not in MY town, I hope!:eek:
Azul-
Your trees in all sketches with them are quite wonderfully quirky!:cool:

Interestingly, a digital art group I belong called Digital Art Quirks to is having as their first "Altered Art" challenge a work inspired by ROUSSEAU called A walk in the forest.....

Here's the link....4 entries so far:

http://www.digitalartquirks.com/photopost/showgallery.php?cat=582

Will try and cross-link them to the group here!

LGHumphrey
10-12-2009, 05:02 AM
Hi WildGoose, amazing what those people can do with digital.

This one is entitled "Ceci n'est pas le chat de Pierre Loti."

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/12-Oct-2009/60616-P1040195.JPG

azulparsnip
10-12-2009, 09:50 AM
Thanks Janet and Sandra for the comments

LHum - the sailor sketch has a seaworthy feel about it. The up curved mustash is the high point of the whole thing for me. Ceci n'est' pas is solid- I feel transfixed by the intense glare of that imposing kitty.

WildGoose - those are some fun takes on Rousseau. Digital art opens up alot of imaginative opportunity.

I don't know why but this stuff is habit forming.:eek: I hope to get another one done soon.

brianvds
10-18-2009, 08:42 AM
As usual, I'm a bit late to this thread. It can be surprisingly difficult to try to deliberately paint in naive manner. But as I mentioned in another thread, I recently discovered things I did some years ago when I was a much more naive artist than I am now. Here's one of my whimsical creations of the time:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/18-Oct-2009/142294-rougemont.JPG

It was based on a true story that I had read of a certain Mr. Rougemont who told tall tales about his adventures in the far-off corners of the world, which included long journeys on the backs of turtles...

gakinme
10-18-2009, 12:17 PM
That is very cute, Brian. Wow, this Mr. Rougemont has a great imagination and you have the same to illustrate it! The water is well done and the turtle seems very happy to have a companion! Is Mr. Rougemont French ?

brianvds
10-18-2009, 11:51 PM
That is very cute, Brian. Wow, this Mr. Rougemont has a great imagination and you have the same to illustrate it! The water is well done and the turtle seems very happy to have a companion! Is Mr. Rougemont French ?
I can't quite remember the details of the case. I read it in a book about famous charlatans. I think he actually only pretended to be French or something. ;-)

Here are two more that I did at the time, both sort of deliberately in naive style, but also because I wasn't really capable of anything else. For a time there I sort of deliberately did much work from imagination, trying to capture the naive mood, without ever quite succeeding:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/18-Oct-2009/142294-183-8336_IMG.JPG

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/18-Oct-2009/142294-183-8337_IMG.JPG

azulparsnip
10-21-2009, 08:15 PM
Brian, those are perfectly naive......I especially like the buzzard? Yep, I found it hard to paint naively but it is fun to try..........Maybe I'll get one more done before November.

artbyjune
10-22-2009, 06:46 AM
Here's my Rousseau-inspired jungle theme. OPs, Murano paper, 12 by 16 ins. Good fun to do...I can see I need to research foliage!!

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/22-Oct-2009/106623-eden1a6kb.jpg

Its quite dark because I used dark brown pastel paper...a bit of a short cut.;)

artbyjune
10-22-2009, 06:50 AM
Brian I love those running buffaloes, the bird and of course the 'doctor Dolittle' type on the turtle. How marvellous is that?

Lawrence, your studies of Rousseau are terrific. You really captured them.

Robin, I do love your quirky tree beside the house!!

azulparsnip
10-22-2009, 09:46 PM
June - lovely jungle piece. I like what you did with the light shadow falling accross her lap - the yellow around her legs and the blue sky ....all the foilage looks great to me.
And the lemurs and pipes....... Beautiful piece. Congrats

trafford
10-23-2009, 06:39 AM
LG... really like that little sailor guy and that great cat.

Brian......So like the herd and the big bird. Mr Rougemont and the turtle is very naive and illustratee.

June....You kill me. So bright and beautiful.

I'm not only learning from the masters, but from my fellow classicos. :heart:

gakinme
10-23-2009, 09:16 AM
Brian the bird looks like naive art alright. But those oxen? resembles some of the Indian art. Very nice! Very good shading to their bodies.

June, finally, an oil pastel piece. Your foliage is perfect and good colors. The girl has good gradation of colors.

artbyjune
10-24-2009, 05:56 AM
Many thanks for the comments.

This is the first OP I've done in a while. Somehow, jungles and OPs go together, in my mind ....at any rate.


I am glad we have Rousseau to study again in an upcoming oldies.

There's a sunflower in this weeks WDE. So I think I'll give it a go...try to get foliage and flower shapes into my mind for use in those upcoming jungles!

LGHumphrey
10-24-2009, 05:03 PM
June, fabulous jungle scene.

trafford
10-27-2009, 10:26 AM
Here is my naive...inspired by prose piece by James Agee.

Excerpt from Knoxville: Summer of 1915

All my people are larger bodies than mine, ...
with voices gentle and meaningless like the voice of sleeping birds.
One is an artist, he is living at home.
One is a musician, she is living at home.
One is my mother who is good to me.
One is my father who is good to me.
By some chance, here they are, all on this earth;
and who shall ever tell the sorrow of being on this earth,
lying, on quilts, on the grass, in a summer evening, among the sounds of the night.
May God bless my people, my uncle, my aunt, my mother, my good father,
oh, remember them kindly in their time of trouble;
and in the hour of their taking away.

456107

gakinme
10-27-2009, 11:33 AM
Ooh, Janet, this is totally naive art style. Very nice. The mattress and the two people in the front is just perfect!!!Great details too.

artbyjune
10-27-2009, 01:06 PM
Excellent naive art!! Its just perfect!!

brianvds
10-29-2009, 10:44 PM
Brian, those are perfectly naive......I especially like the buzzard? Yep, I found it hard to paint naively but it is fun to try..........Maybe I'll get one more done before November.

It's a marabou stork, widely considered to be amongst the ugliest birds on the planet. If you do a Google image search you'll see for yourself. ;-)

brianvds
10-29-2009, 10:46 PM
Here's my Rousseau-inspired jungle theme. OPs, Murano paper, 12 by 16 ins. Good fun to do...I can see I need to research foliage!!

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/22-Oct-2009/106623-eden1a6kb.jpg

Its quite dark because I used dark brown pastel paper...a bit of a short cut.;)

Lovely piece. Very Rousseau-like. Not sure one should actually do any research for naive art. If you do it might no longer be naive. ;-)

brianvds
10-29-2009, 11:07 PM
Here is my naive...inspired by prose piece by James Agee.


Very nice: you sure got that naive look right, skewed perspective and all.

Incidentally, I have recently rediscovered the work of the Gothic and early Renaissance masters, who all had to basically reinvent art from scratch, and worked at a time before much technical knowledge had accumulated. It is striking how often their work has a certain naive quality to it.

E.g. here are two works by Sassetta (Stefano di Giovanni) who worked in the early fifteenth century but whose work was still heavily inspired by 14th century and earlier models. Meeting of St. Anthony and St. Paul:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/29-Oct-2009/142294-Sassetta_Stefano_di_Giovanni_Meeting_of_Sts_Anthony_and_Paul_1440.jpg

Note how the picture tells a story, instead of freezing a single moment. You see St. Anthony in three different places: setting out on his journey, converting a centaur to Christianity, and then the actual meeting with St. Paul, at the bottom of the picture. This narrative device is very common in naive art, (but was also used a lot in the Renaissance), as is of course the fact that details like the trees and perspective are completely phantasmagorical.

And here is a picture of the journey of the Magi (from the Nativity story):

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/29-Oct-2009/142294-Sassetta_Stefano_di_Giovanni_Journey_of_the_magi_b_30cm_tempera_1435.jpg

Once again colourful and uninhibited in a way that you seldom see in later centuries. This could almost be Grandma Moses. And for the very best in Gothic "naive" art, one needs but to look at the marvellous illuminated manuscripts they produced at the time; those pictures never fail to enchant me.

Incidentally, I got both of these pictures at http://www.wga.hu/index1.html where there is a HUGE collection of Renaissance art. Go check it out.

azulparsnip
10-30-2009, 12:40 AM
thanks for posting these Brian......they are delightful.....

artbyjune
10-30-2009, 02:42 AM
I like the way the naive art of the 20th century links back to medieval art. I saw a little book on Bosch in the library whilst browsing there yesterday. I didnt borrow it but maybe next week I'll go back and get it. The medieval artists like Fouquet, Giotto etc might be good for study later!

As for doing research into foliage...I think its not so much artistic technique research as just looking at what different foliage and flora types live in the jungle or tropics to include them in a painting. I think Rousseau looked at plants in conservatories and on postcards etc. And I don't think it made his work less naive!!

brianvds
10-30-2009, 04:10 AM
I like the way the naive art of the 20th century links back to medieval art. I saw a little book on Bosch in the library whilst browsing there yesterday. I didnt borrow it but maybe next week I'll go back and get it. The medieval artists like Fouquet, Giotto etc might be good for study later!

Yup, that would be a cool idea. I just love Gothic and early Renaissance art, although I am completely in awe of some of those artists, especially the early Flemish painters like Van der Weyden. In some ways, they have really never been surpassed.

But with the Italian early Renaissance, because the artists did not yet have very great technical knowledge, the work is often more accessible for precisely that reason - us common mortals feel we can at least aspire to it, whereas Michelangelo just makes me feel totally incompetent. ;-)

Still, I make a habit of studying the work of all the Renaissance masters; there is much to be learned there.

As for doing research into foliage...I think its not so much artistic technique research as just looking at what different foliage and flora types live in the jungle or tropics to include them in a painting. I think Rousseau looked at plants in conservatories and on postcards etc. And I don't think it made his work less naive!!

I find that if you work from memory a bit more often, it makes you far more attentive to what you see around you, and you begin, if effect, to study all the time. So by all means go study foliage, but it might be a good idea to just observe and then work from memory.

trafford
10-30-2009, 07:30 AM
The art movement next month is going to be Dutch and Flemish Renaissance Painting (1500-1584) Picked this time because of the many paintings of food and merriment besides the religious ones. Bosch is included in this group. I always thought that some of his paintings were very surreal. :heart:

brianvds
10-30-2009, 08:06 AM
The art movement next month is going to be Dutch and Flemish Renaissance Painting (1500-1584) Picked this time because of the many paintings of food and merriment besides the religious ones. Bosch is included in this group. I always thought that some of his paintings were very surreal. :heart:

They're pretty disturbing stuff, and would be well suited to the Halloween thread as well. If you paint stuff like that nowadays they put you in a room with mattresses on the walls... ;-)

I think I'm going to stick to Bruegel, so I'm glad you informed me: now I can go find a nice one to work on so long.

trafford
10-30-2009, 08:19 AM
Either a padded cell or selling paintings for millions of dollars, or maybe both.

Yes, Bruegel, Elder and Younger. :cool:

artbyjune
10-30-2009, 01:58 PM
One of my favourite artists is Roger van der Weyden!

brianvds
10-30-2009, 03:16 PM
One of my favourite artists is Roger van der Weyden!

Ah yes, one of my all-time favourites as well. I live in complete and utter awe of the man though; wouldn't even attempt to copy any of his work. At least not in paint. Might give it a go in pencil.