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meatball2006
09-07-2009, 08:24 PM
Have anyone here have success selling their work on Ebay?
What were your experiences?
I'm trying out a painting on there now.
There's a link on my blog if your want to check it out and give me any ideas on listing.
Thanks, Paul:thumbsup:

keemo
09-11-2009, 02:44 PM
I have been selling on ebay for about 3 years. I sell only small pieces that won't hurt my feelings if they go for $10. The most underestimated value of ebay is the promotional value. Many larger commissions have been generated from ebay exposure. Almost all of my serious collectors also originated from ebay. Explore and experiment and try to find out what works for you. Ebay is not for everyone.

meatball2006
09-11-2009, 05:24 PM
Thanks Keemo,
The exposure angle is a good way to look at it.
Thanks for the Info.
Paul

salmon
09-12-2009, 10:50 AM
This is only my opinion, ignore it if you want but it comes with the experience of selling paintings on eBay for years.

Your starting price is way too high. I know it's hard letting our creations go but you've got to be realistic, especially in these cash strapped times. I'd put that on eBay starting at $4.99. That way the market will decide what it is worth and you need to know that before you put more work on. You can then gauge how much effort to put into each piece to see if it will be worth your while continuing.

Take a look at the competition. There is some good stuff out there which doesn't sell even though it's price is rock bottom. Subject matter maybe?

Unfortunately, it seems that anyone who can hold a crayon, is blitzing eBay at the moment. Lost job. Desperate financial situation. Don't know. So the art categories are getting swamped with second rate work which reflects badly on the good work which may get lost amongst it. So whatever you do has got to be good, different, value for money.

Having said that, if you can produce correctly priced work, and don't mind taking a hit occasionally, you can build a surprisingly loyal following who will hunt you down and collect your work. When this happens, bidding wars break out amongst them and your prices appreciate accordingly.

It is said that now is a bad time for artists on eBay and I've never known there to be a good time to start, so why not now. Dip your toe in and see what happens but be realistic about what your stuff is really worth.

wayfarer
09-12-2009, 11:33 AM
I sold very well on eBay a few years back when there wasn't a lot of competition. Oh, the days of multiple bids! Sorry, salmon, I disagree about price. As artists, we're trying to make a living too. Unless you have the kind of production where you're turning out a lot of art, sales are may be far and few between. You have your costs to cover too.

There's another side of this too. As an artist, you're putting yourself out there in a way that no other seller does. It's a matter of your worth as an artist and how you value your work. Don't cave in and sell for pennies just to make a sale. Your creativity is worth more.

Chris

salmon
09-12-2009, 04:03 PM
Sorry, salmon, I disagree about price. As artists, we're trying to make a living too. Unless you have the kind of production where you're turning out a lot of art, sales are may be far and few between.
It's quite alright to disagree wayfarer, as I said in the beginning of my post this is only my opinion and my opinion carries no more weight than anyone elses. My mention of the price was so that meatball could put the work out there at a low price to see how buyers respond to it. If they got 20 bids and it sold for say $25 then that would give ideas on the popularity of the work and the demand for that type of work from buyers. Then price the work accordingly in the future. If the work was put out at $50 and there was zero interest at that price level then meatball would feel deflated and possibly give the idea up.

You have your costs to cover too. It's a matter of your worth as an artist and how you value your work. Don't cave in and sell for pennies just to make a sale. Your creativity is worth more.

Costs. Assuming you are a full time artist who has the costs of a studio to run, materials, etc. etc. I'd agree, but if one is a leisure painter who decides to sell the odd painting, then whether or not a painting sells, the costs will still be met by the painter because they enjoy doing it.


Your creativity is worth more.It may be worth a lot to you but it may not be worth that much to someone else. Don't forget it's the result of your creativity you are selling not the creativity itself. My creativity is priceless and I couldnt imagine living without being creative in one way or other. The results of my creativity is something else. Hopefully someone will want to own them, if they don't I can still get pleasure from being creative. It's a case of finding the people who do like what we do and hope it has enough of an interest that people want to own it.

There's no point in painting pieces that you don't want to sell because you think the price is too low. If that was the case I'd have thousands of artworks cluttering up my place - to what end? Best to get it out there and have your name on peoples walls. Let's not pretend we're going to be the next Picasso or Matisse. For every major name in the art world there are millions who we have never heard of and probably never will. Once again this is only my opinion.

idahogirl
09-12-2009, 08:00 PM
Paul,

Congratulations, I see you have a bid. This is a lovely piece. I don't think you can change the listing now that you have a bid, but I would suggest on future listings that you include "plein air" in the title. These words are heavily searched and will get you more views.

Good luck!

:wave:

Dee

Dennis Brady
09-12-2009, 09:31 PM
There's another side of this too. As an artist, you're putting yourself out there in a way that no other seller does. It's a matter of your worth as an artist and how you value your work. Don't cave in and sell for pennies just to make a sale. Your creativity is worth more.

Ebay is a flea market and shouldn't be expected to generate any better then flea market prices. If you're unwilling to sell at flea market prices, why offer it for sale at a flea market?

Price is determined by the marketplace. There is no such thing as real value. There is only perceived value. It's reasonable to perceive that anything offered for sale at a flea market has low value. If you expect buyers to perceive your work has greater value, offer it for sale elsewhere.

Florence
09-13-2009, 03:27 AM
I agree that it only makes sense to sell on eBay if you are ready to sell cheap for a long time. If you are willing to do this, you may build a following over time. I don't know if this works for everyone though.

I gave it up because it was too much work and too frustrating. I ended up having to pack and ship a painting that I was selling for a few dollars. This made me unhappy, but another thing I noticed is that the buyers were not happy either, because they felt that what they were buying was worthless. The lower my prices were, the more problems I had with buyers.

Just my 2 cents, but everyone has a different experience. I suggest you keep trying it for some time and decide if it works for you.

blondheim12
09-13-2009, 09:45 AM
Back in the day, I made a lot of money on Ebay. After it went down hill, I stopped listing for a few years. About 4 months ago, I decided that the promotional value should not be ignored. It is reallly a great way to advertise my studio pretty cheaply. I started listing 5 paintings a week, all 5x7 studies at 3.99 for opening bid. Some sell for 3.99 but others sell for 50.00+ I have begun to build a following of buyers from California and Texas. Mostly, I do it for the promotion of my web site, but they are selling so it's free advertizing.

Love,
Linda

idahogirl
09-13-2009, 11:28 AM
Back in the day, I made a lot of money on Ebay. After it went down hill, I stopped listing for a few years. About 4 months ago, I decided that the promotional value should not be ignored. It is reallly a great way to advertise my studio pretty cheaply. I started listing 5 paintings a week, all 5x7 studies at 3.99 for opening bid. Some sell for 3.99 but others sell for 50.00+ I have begun to build a following of buyers from California and Texas. Mostly, I do it for the promotion of my web site, but they are selling so it's free advertizing.



Hi Linda,

Great ideas... Would you mind being more specific as to how you use it for promotion. Do you link to your website... emails? or ???

Your fan

:wave:

Dee

RobinZ
09-13-2009, 11:50 AM
Just go to ebay and seach "blondheim" and you'll find her. But watch out, you'll find something you love and bid on it like I did! Thanks Linda for the advice.

Now that I'm fulltime again, I plan on making ebay a part of my promo plan, as well.

The ONE thing I can say that's really really important, is to keep your quality up. Don't think "oh, it's just ebay". If it's one of your calling cards, make it count.

And another thing...you MUST keep them coming. They sell each other. In other words, someone searches for, say, in Linda's case, "palm tree", and finds Linda's. THen, they are likely to want to see all of Linda's work, and if the first palm tree might not have hit a chord with them, but the flower study did and they buy that.

I found that worked for me.

Dennis Brady
09-13-2009, 12:02 PM
Another consideration.

I work with many gallery and gift shop owners. As much as artists/artisans need help dealing with retail shop owners, those owners need help dealing with artists and artisans. Pretty much all retailers expressed a hardline negative opinion of anyone that sells on ebay. They said they would never consider buying anything from anybody that sold on ebay. As one shop owner so well put it, "Nothing selling on ebay will ever be in my shop".

RobinZ
09-13-2009, 01:06 PM
Yeah, we've discussed that many times here. Linda, for one, is proof that you can do both, I suspect they care more about having salable higher end art when you get right down to it than worrying that someone's offering their studies for sale on ebay.

I for one am not really interested in a gallery and since I'm not a manufacturer like you, not interested gift shops, either, so it doesn't matter to me.

wayfarer
09-14-2009, 10:26 AM
The price issue is the same as what freelancers like myself encounter with writing. Sites will advertise positions for $1 an article. Writing is worth more. Creativity is worth more. EBay like Elance and other freelancing sites are flea markets, but at those flea markets are gems.

Have you forgotten the impact of sweat shop "art"? I stand by my words and encourage all artists to do so. If you value your creativity, give it value. If you don't, no one will.

Chris

painterswife
09-14-2009, 12:49 PM
Ebay is about selling. You can use it to get bargain prices or you can use it to get great prices.

You must decide if the work it takes is worth the price you get.

With regards to going to galleries after you have been successful on ebay. If you are selling and selling well, the galleries will ignore where you started. If they are galleries that think they should shun you because of where you started your success than they are the losers in the end. Galleries that survive are about making money, if you sell well they will come a calling.

blondheim12
09-14-2009, 01:37 PM
I've shown my work in high end galleries for years. The Ebay is not an issue for them. I am showing large format serious paintings in galleries. It is simply not the same product or venue. Besides, I go my own way and do what I wish to. I am not dependent on my galleries to make my living. I never put all my eggs in any basket. The promotion value from Ebay is worth the effort for me. It may not be for anyone else.
Robin,
I am grateful and honored by your support.
Love,
Linda

meatball2006
09-22-2009, 08:09 PM
Thanks all for your opinions.
following some of the other Artist's selling on ebay it seems it's a hit or miss. there could be a buyer out there who would've liked your style but did'nt check out ebay during your active auction dates. I started my first auction with the lowest price I would take for it. Luckily it sold. Now I can buy some supplies. I'd rather keep a painting or give it as a gift then sell it for $3.99. But who knows maybe I'll give that a try too.
That's why I like Wet Canvas. So many willing to help.
I'm trying another auction.
Thanks Again, Paul:thumbsup:

rltromble
09-22-2009, 10:23 PM
I think you have to have a hard line when it comes to e-bay. Sorry, but if you list a painting for 4.99, that's a bit stupid. Think about what is the minimum price you would sell that item and list it there. $25-49 ($100-200 for something larger)maybe. If people like it they will bid it up. Some people view a really low price as the sign of poor or mass produced art. You may get only one bid. You need to at least cover cost of materials. On the other hand you must be realistic. Most people go to e-bay to find deals, perhaps a gift, something to fill that empty space on the wall that fits their style or something truly unique and maybe a tiny few look for fine art. To put this in perspective here one of your competitors.
http://cgi.ebay.com/SERVAL-New-SARAH-STRIBBLING-Original-Oil_W0QQitemZ200384213502QQcmdZViewItemQQptZArt_Paintings?hash=item2ea7d471fe&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14
E-bay stuff doesn't necessarily see value, not because the stuff isn't valuable, but because many bidders are looking for a deal. (Personally that painting should have sold for 4 times that much). Commonly I buy books and oil paints on e-bay and I can tell you this. Usually what I get would cost much more if I bought it from the store. Last time I bought paints on e-bay I got 10 W&N artist paints for $25. At the store the same paints would have cost me over $200. E-bay-nomics at its best.
Ps. Paul your Pochade box's are really neat, I might have to bid on one, one of these days.:rolleyes:

blondheim12
09-22-2009, 10:33 PM
You have to understand that the paintings I'm putting on ebay are studies. I do hundreds of them a year to teach myself painting skills. Anybody who looks at my web site will understand that I am not a mass producer of cheap art. As I said, the studies are what I consider a great way to advertise my studio and the large paintings I do for a living.
Love,
Linda

rltromble
09-23-2009, 01:19 AM
I think you mistook my comment.
Linda I am not suggesting your art is mass produced, but a lot of art on e-bay is, some of it isn't. Some of it is poor, some is nice. Your art is exceptional, it really is and you have been doing this much longer then me. But I just say start at a fair price, even if it is a study, that way you at least recoup material costs. E-bay and paypal do take a cut too, I don't remember how much, been awhile since I have listed, but when you sell for 4.99, you make what $2-3 out of that. Not even worth the trip to post office. List at $15-$20, fine you are taking a loss, but your inventory is thinned a bit and it is a least worth the trip to send it out.

blondheim12
09-23-2009, 09:42 AM
RL,
I understand. The thing is that it's more important for people to click on my listing and look at the information about me than anything else. Starting at a low price allows them the curiosity to click and look. Since some of the paintings sell for 50.00+, I'm doing ok as far as the cost of the advertizing. It is far cheaper than running ads and as I said before. I am building a following with these little paintings. Believe it or not, I have made a few serious sales from my web site due to the ebay listings. I once sold a 3,000.00 painting to an Ebay follower.

I'm not suggesting that everyone should do this. It may not be right at all for you or others. The thing is that I am looking at this escapade from the advertising perspective rather than whether it makes sense to sell studies for a few dollars. It's not about the studies. It's about getting people onto the web site and then signing up for the newsletter and so forth.

Love,
Linda

RobinZ
09-23-2009, 04:48 PM
Yes, the more eyeballs that you can get to look at your site, the more likely you are to sell. And you've "qualified" the eyeballs from ebay, they are already interested in your work.

Jeffrey Lafferty
09-24-2009, 09:10 PM
Personally I like EBay. I like it because its a good place to move paintings, if it wasnít I wouldnít mess with it. Its just as legitimate a place to sell your work as anywhere else.

I do agree with keeping the minimum bid high. When I started selling about a year ago, I did what EBay suggests and started a few pieces with a minimum bid of $.99 When I sold one of them for $10.00 bucks I wanted to shoot myself. So defiantly make your minimum bid the price you want to get and stick to it.

Somebody on this forum gave me this example, and I think it was the best piece of advice Iíve ever gotten about EBay.

Three buyers go to an auction, one is looking for deals and has $5.00 bucks in his pocket. The second one has $50.00 and the third is a Ďfaní of your stuff and has $250.00

If you set a minimum bid of .99 the piece is going to sell for $51.00 (the first guy is out bid, the second and third guys fight over it till its to $51.00)

Now what if the second guy doesnít show up? then it sells for $6.00 to the third guy (even though you had a fan of your work willing to spend $250.00 it will sell for $6.00 in this scenario of an auction setting)

thatís why I think minimum bids are super important on EBay.
Jeff

GKW
09-24-2009, 11:20 PM
Awesome point

Lynxes123
09-27-2009, 01:23 AM
I like ebay too and don't see anything wrong with selling there. I think the auctions are fun and exciting. I had 18 bids on one of my aceos today! :cool: :wave:

Jeffrey Lafferty
09-27-2009, 07:50 PM
Eighteen bids? wow, now that impressive. I rarely get over six or seven, whatís your secret?

Personally I think thatís the toughest part of selling on EBay, just getting people to find your auction. Its so huge its easy to get lost in the crowd.
Jeff

Lynxes123
09-28-2009, 12:26 AM
Hi Jeff, thanks so much. Ha, I'm thinking it was just pure luck because I've never had that many bids on one. What really surprised me, was that I had another one run out on the same day, and I got 0 bids on it. I thought it was better than the one with all the bids. I was just looking at your ebay items and I love your portrait aceos, they're really stunning! Have you tried using twitter.com to help market your listings? Just an idea, because I know I get lots most views when I post my new listings into twitter. I'm not even sure who is looking but I know the views go way up when I do. :D :wave:

Jeffrey Lafferty
09-28-2009, 08:58 PM
Thanks Lynette thatís a great tip, Iíll give it a twitter a try.
Jeff

Steve Orin
09-30-2009, 08:17 AM
I've studied 3 selling sites - Ebay, I Offer and Craig's. Came to the conclusion they're only for selling cheap, no-time involved stuff. Like at the flea market. I just paid $5200 for a new A/C. Took one day to install. $350 to fix the fridge - one hour. If I spend a week painting I'm to peddle it for 25 bucks!? Don't think so. So for me the Q's not answered... The paintings pile up & I earn my keep on the pro-painter side. Perhaps I'll be famous when dead. Better than made a willing fool!

Horsa
09-30-2009, 11:11 AM
I have found e-bay's "World of Good" site to be stronger in sales than my website for my Fair Trade gift shop. We list the same merchandise, at the same prices on both sites.

I think a lot of selling on e-bay, Etsy, Craig's List etc comes down to a matter of luck. You need to have your listing active, with the right key words, when a potential buyer is searching the site. Then you need to have the most appealing offer among all the search hits.

Depending on what you are selling, and what pricepoint you need to get on the sale, it may or may not be worth while for you to sell in these venues.

E-bay can be a great place to get rid of odds and ends that otherwise would just take up space. It is not the first resource I would turn to if I was looking for high-end merchandise at anything other than bargain basement prices.

Jennifer Miller
09-30-2009, 12:02 PM
It greatly depends. The company I work for has a loyal following of fans and collectors- and that's what makes the difference. If you can achieve this, you'll get bidding wars and that's what really drives the prices up. My custom 'one of a kind' painted (but still open edition multiple cast) pieces seem to average $1k-$5k. But again the company has a well known name and the bidders are competing to collect. That's the key factor in the high prices we've seen come out of eBay.

AllaboutColors
10-02-2009, 10:13 PM
Great to hear all the ebayers' experiences. I've started doing smaller acrylics, quite different from my oils & pastels, (different style & less detailed), and I wasn't sure I wanted to put them on my website, but thought they might sell somewhere. I think I'll try them on ebay.