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View Full Version : Which brushes for WMO?


couturej
08-18-2009, 09:16 AM
I'm wondering which brushes work the best for WMO.:)

dspinks
08-18-2009, 11:13 AM
I started out using only synthetic or natural/synthetic blends. I found that all-natural hog bristle brushes would get very wimpy and floppy from the water from my rinse jar. Since I started using the Artisan thinner, however, I can use any brush I like. I keep a small dish of the thinner close by for color-change cleaning and only use soap and water for my end-of-day brush washing.

As for all-synthetics, the WN Artisan series is good. Also, Sterling Brush Bristlons are nice.

Debra

andres123
08-18-2009, 11:37 AM
I bought a few Princeton 6300 series brushes and really like them. Good stiffness, which is important for W&N cause they're on the thick side.

DAK723
08-18-2009, 01:50 PM
As mentioned, natural hog bristle brushes are not recommended if you use water. They absorb the water and get bloated!

I think (I'm at work and can't check) that I also have the Princeton 6300 series and like them a lot!

Don

mplsmarjorie
08-18-2009, 06:07 PM
I have so many brushes, and some are all painty and I can't see what they say. Are hog bristle the whitish ones? And is anyone able to do really fine lines with these paints? I feel almost like I am finger painting most of the time unless I thin so much that there is very little pigment.

dbclemons
08-18-2009, 06:41 PM
I have a range of sythentics and natural hair brushes as well as blends and I just reach for whatever's handy depending on the shape I need. Another thing Holbein does well is brushes.

There's a good book called "Brushwork Essentials" by Mark Christopher Weber about proper use of brushes, and he happens to use water-soluble paints in many of his demonstrations.

keenart
08-19-2009, 12:30 AM
I have been using W&N Lexington Bristle, University Gold Synthetic, and Galeria Synthetics. I also use the softer Gold Taklon for precision work.

couturej
08-19-2009, 08:18 AM
Thank you everyone for your suggestions on brushes! :)

Shirl Parker
08-19-2009, 06:00 PM
...There's a good book called "Brushwork Essentials" by Mark Christopher Weber about proper use of brushes, and he happens to use water-soluble paints in many of his demonstrations.

Finally, someone recommends a book I already have. :clap: :clap: :clap:

I guess now would be a good time to take another look.:lol:

Susan H
08-20-2009, 09:49 PM
Thanks for recommending the book As i've been looking for something like this. I use any kind of brush but mostly use bristle, Artisan and badger brushes. For detailed work I use sable. Seems the thicker the paint the more sturdy the brush should be. For bristle, only very stiff brushes work well for me, like Winsor Newton Winton. Lately I've been liking the Artisan brushes, tho. Susan

couturej
08-21-2009, 08:15 AM
Thank you Susan for all great options! :)

hal_s
08-23-2009, 06:16 PM
The Artisan brushes are too stiff, at least in the smaller sizes. They scrape the paint off the surface instead of spreading it.

I like Robert Simmons Titanium brushes for most of my brushwork, and I use watercolor brushes (Robert Simmons Sapphire and Sienna) for the fine detail and blending.

couturej
08-23-2009, 07:29 PM
Hi Hal! Thank you for providing your selection for brushes. :)

judyfilarecki
08-24-2009, 09:07 AM
There's a good book called "Brushwork Essentials" by Mark Christopher Weber about proper use of brushes, and he happens to use water-soluble paints in many of his demonstrations.I'll have to check that out. It sounds like it would be a good resource.

I use the walnut oil to thin the paint to use with my script or liner brush. You don't have to use much to get the paint to a great consistency for thin lines without it getting "waterly".
judy

karenlee
08-24-2009, 10:08 AM
Guess I'm the only one using Raphael Kevrin brushes; they are between hog bristle and sable in stiffness.

couturej
08-24-2009, 12:12 PM
Thank you Judy and Karen for the further suggestions!

jmckelvin
08-25-2009, 09:37 AM
I'm not sure any of the extra details on my brushes, but most of mine are Royal soft grip. I like the rubber grip on them and they have a descent stiffness for me, not too soft but not overly stiff.

Shirl Parker
08-25-2009, 12:31 PM
I like the Royal soft grip as well.

couturej
08-25-2009, 01:57 PM
jmckelvin and Shirl, sounds like a good choice. I have found some of the brushes I currently have too soft. Thank you!

Saturday Painter
09-27-2009, 03:12 PM
I started using synthetics and rinsed them often in water. I found that I didn't like the character of the brush strokes. I switched to good quality hog bristle and mostly wipe my brushes until I clean at the end. You need to keep more brushes available this way, but I like the results better.

couturej
09-27-2009, 04:16 PM
Thank you Vicki I'll pick some up and try them out. :)

greywolf-art
09-29-2009, 07:29 AM
I don't know why I missed this thread before, I mostly use Handmade brushes By Rosemary, a company based In my home county of Yorkshire, their website can be seen here:

http://www.rosemaryandco.com/

Despite being handmade their brushes are actually very affordable and you can tell the difference in quality from the mass produced ones.

I have a set of their Chungking bristle brushes which I find to have a nice balance of stiffnes without being too 'scratchy', but my favourites are their Mongoose brushes which have a good stiffness combined with a nice velvety touch, they are a bit like working with Sable but firmer and they hold their shape/point very well :)

I've just bought some of their new synthetic mongoose brushes to try ouy but have not had the chance to test them out yet so can't comment on them, but I can thouroughly reccomend the Mongoose range - especially the fan blenders which are far superior to any other fan I've tried (though the synthetic ones are not of the same quality).

couturej
09-29-2009, 11:35 PM
Graham, very interesting that you can purchase handmade brushes. Thank you for your help!

I did go out of town today and was able to pick up some new brushes. I wasn't able to find many of the recommended types in the shape and sizes I wanted. I decided to go with the most expensive ones just to test out the whole theory regarding the most expensive=best results. I'm not necessarily a believer in that idea I think it can depend on style and individual preference. The bristles seemed fairly stiff so that's good. They're Titanium Robert Simmons. I noticed when I ran my fingers across the bristles that a white powder seemed to come off the bristles. Is that normal? Should I be cleaning these brushes before I use them?

greywolf-art
09-30-2009, 06:33 AM
yes thats normal to get some powder from a new hog brush, just give them a good wash before your first use and the powder should be rinsed out.

I agree that expensive does not always mean best, some of the winsor & newton brushes are actually more expensive than my hand made brushes and the quality is definitely not better, but having said that I've also found that the really cheap brushes are just not worth buying.

BTW Rosemary Brushes deliver to Canada and the USA for a flat fee of 5 (about $8) regardless of how many brushes you order and it only takes about 5-7 days for delivery

marie_d
09-30-2009, 06:57 AM
I don't know why I missed this thread before, I mostly use Handmade brushes By Rosemary, a company based In my home county of Yorkshire, their website can be seen here:

http://www.rosemaryandco.com/

Despite being handmade their brushes are actually very affordable and you can tell the difference in quality from the mass produced ones.

I have a set of their Chungking bristle brushes which I find to have a nice balance of stiffnes without being too 'scratchy', but my favourites are their Mongoose brushes which have a good stiffness combined with a nice velvety touch, they are a bit like working with Sable but firmer and they hold their shape/point very well :)

I've just bought some of their new synthetic mongoose brushes to try ouy but have not had the chance to test them out yet so can't comment on them, but I can thouroughly reccomend the Mongoose range - especially the fan blenders which are far superior to any other fan I've tried (though the synthetic ones are not of the same quality).

Thanks for the link Graham, what good value brushes. Now I know what I want for Xmas:D At these prices I can have different sets of brushes now, rounds, filberts, pointed etc.....:thumbsup:

couturej
09-30-2009, 08:29 AM
Thank you Graham for your help regarding the powder on the brush. Good to know that the Rosemary Brushes ship to Canada. I'll take a closer look at them and may place an order once my art supply money is replenished.

couturej
10-03-2009, 10:09 AM
I would just like to share my thoughts on the new brushes I bought the "Titanium Rober Simmons". They're fantastic and now I know that not all brushes are created equally. I'm able to get better brushstrokes. They're better for blending and I can wipe paint off them much easier then my other brushes. I can't wait to buy more. :)

trapper36
10-06-2009, 02:02 AM
Judy:
As you use walnut oil with W/M oils, you are probably a good one to ask:
Do you lose any of the "watermixableness" if you don't use the W/M medium with your paints?

mawdwyn
10-06-2009, 11:55 AM
Trapper -
Another M. Graham fan here...
Walnut oil and walnut-alkyd clean up just fine with soap and water. You can still use water to dampen and rinse your brushes with while painting.

As for brushes; I've been using Silver Brush synthetics (Ruby Satin and Bristlon) for several years. They've held up well in spite of all the abuse I give them! Their Grand Prix (natural bristle) brushes are great if you don't use a lot of water (soggy bristles).

Callie

greywolf-art
10-06-2009, 01:20 PM
Trapper -
Another M. Graham fan here...
Walnut oil and walnut-alkyd clean up just fine with soap and water. You can still use water to dampen and rinse your brushes with while painting.

As for brushes; I've been using Silver Brush synthetics (Ruby Satin and Bristlon) for several years. They've held up well in spite of all the abuse I give them! Their Grand Prix (natural bristle) brushes are great if you don't use a lot of water (soggy bristles).

Callie

bit off topic really as this thread is about brushes not mediums, but anyway I think what trapper meant was can you still thin the paints with water if you use walnut oil - any oil paint can be cleaned with soap and water if you work hard enough at it :rolleyes:

judyfilarecki
10-07-2009, 02:56 AM
Judy:
As you use walnut oil with W/M oils, you are probably a good one to ask:
Do you lose any of the "watermixableness" if you don't use the W/M medium with your paints?The walnut oil is the only thing I use . Water tends to make the paint too sticky or dilutes the color too much when you make a thin wash.

I only use the water for cleanup. I find my brushes stay much better, especially any bristle ones, if they are minimally exposed to water. Even when changing colors, I just wipe the brushes off unless, I am going into a significant change of color where I would not want a trace of the previous color. ..Judy