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maverick
04-09-2007, 11:29 AM
I originally shared my progress for these paintings over in the Acrylics forum, but thought you folks here might be interested.

After finding that my more detailed underpainting for Apples in a Short Wave Radio Box made it easier to finish the painting, I did a bit of research on the Flemish Technique -- not easy to find information by the way.

Here are the steps I pieced together:

1. drawing,
2. imprimatura (neutral mid-tone wash)
3. umber painting (shadows)
4. dead layer (values)
5-6. color layers
7. highlights and details

I spent the weekend working on 3 small 6x6 paintings, and I tried to follow these steps. It's not that different from what I normally do, except for the dead layer (tonal values).

Egg Cup
6x6 Acrylic on canvas

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Apr-2007/10671-egg__cup_sequence.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Apr-2007/10671-egg_cup2.jpg


Salt Shaker
6x6 Acrlyic on canvas

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Apr-2007/10671-salt_sequence.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Apr-2007/10671-salt_color_3.jpg

maverick
04-09-2007, 11:36 AM
Here is another one where I stopped at the tonal painting step. I'm leaving it the way it is.

Pepper Shaker
6x6 Acrylic on canvas

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Apr-2007/10671-pepper_4.jpg

Newberry
04-09-2007, 09:45 PM
Excellent presentation Mark.

Michael

maverick
04-10-2007, 08:21 PM
Thanks for the feedback Michael, I appreciate it!

onefinepint
04-11-2007, 10:02 AM
Beautiful, beautiful work! Thanks for sharing. :)

maverick
04-11-2007, 11:30 PM
Thank you, and you're welcome!

Stray Bullet
04-12-2007, 02:07 PM
The procedure very well described and the demonstration is excellent.
For me, I have tried this approach in part, but gave up on it as I dont seem to have the discipline for it.
I know this is the proper way to paint, and would probably save me hours at the end of the painting when I spend so much time fiddling and arguing with with small bits of the painting and undoing what I have done in places. Maybe the right way for me is to do some small single focus pieces like your demos before struggling with it on a larger scale.

amurphy
04-13-2007, 08:11 AM
These studys are so helpful. Thank you for sharing.

I like all of them but I am glad you stopped on the pepper shaker. I keep going back to study it.

barkingdogg
04-14-2007, 01:41 PM
Awesome!!! Thanks!

rain24
04-14-2007, 10:03 PM
Great little paintings Maverick. I'm curious though, when you do the color layers, is that glazed on with transparent colors to allow the underpainting to show through? I'm so frustrated with school - they can never explain this technique to me :D.

Thanks,

~Rain

GoldenEagle
04-15-2007, 02:18 PM
The egg is magnificent! Nice work. :)

maverick
04-16-2007, 07:05 PM
Thanks StrayBullet...the little studies are great for practicing and learning.

Thanks Audrey...I liked the way the pepper shaker turned out so I decided to leave it that way.

Thanks Susan!

Thanks Rain...yes the color layers are basically transparent, but you might build them up in some places so you won't notice the dead layer underneath anymore. At least you don't think you notice it.

Thanks GoldenEagle!

PaulSV
04-16-2007, 08:18 PM
Mav, these are all fab but I have to say, that egg and cup is nothing short of great! You have some of the 'silveriest' silver I've ever seen!

Extra Sweet Job!

maverick
04-17-2007, 01:07 AM
Hey Paul, thanks for the kind remarks! I do enjoy painting metal!

Poiema
04-24-2007, 12:45 AM
Egg Cup is outstanding!!
I was just browsing through Still Life. Your painting is amazing to me!! You're very skilled and talented - how you painted that egg cup to look like metal like you did ... well it's beyond me! All three of your pieces are excellent!
The flemish method is interesting...
I appreciate you taking the time to explain it.

maverick
04-24-2007, 08:54 PM
Thank you Jacqui!

I checked out your block prints, and they are outstanding! I like to dabble in block printing. I have a little press that I need to exercise more often...

Poiema
04-25-2007, 12:32 AM
Oh thank you! That is a huge compliment considering it came from you. I guess block printing is my niche. I pull all my prints by hand. Maybe some day I'll 'graduate' to a little press!

Poiema
04-25-2007, 12:42 AM
Mark, what a privilege to be taught art by your grandmother. Is that where you learned to paint metal? Just visited your website - you really have an eye for reflection and color.

maverick
04-25-2007, 03:30 PM
Hi Jacqui, I got a Richeson Baby Press and it's quite nice.

My grandmother got me interested in painting and I took lessons from her when I was about 14-15. Metal is something I taught myself to paint over the last few years.

judithj
04-25-2007, 11:06 PM
Stunning and inspirational Maverick!

This is a very helpful demonstration - many thanks.

I went to your site and I am enthralled with your apples - AMAZING!!!!!!!

-Judith

Galina Zastava
05-22-2008, 04:25 AM
I've tried this technic. May I ask your opinion, please?

maverick
01-18-2009, 08:16 PM
Hi Galina, sorry I wasn't around to answer your question. You probably gave up all hope, but just in case you see my response, here goes...

I think you've done a terrific job on this. I'm flattered that you found my examples good enough to try for yourself. You've captured the metal look very well and I can tell you've concentrated on the abstract shapes on the lid without worrying about what special color is needed to paint metal. That's the secret!

purplepansey
03-30-2009, 11:56 AM
I've tried this technic. May I ask your opinion, please?
This is fabulouse and being taught by the Maverik here on how to do the salt shaker is testamont to his ability to teach. I love it and will try one myself. :clap:

AndyfromVienna
04-12-2009, 07:45 PM
hey maverick,

wonderfully painted .....:clap: :clap: :clap:
just one question: did you find the "dead layer" to be helpful for your painting? I am asking because i dont get the clue what it is good for. you have the imprimatura - chosen in the perfect hue for the painting. then you do the underpainting. just fine. then everything is painted over in a dead color - just why? then you give color back to your painting where the imprimatura and the first underpainting would have been extremely helpful ...

you mention yourself that it is the first time youre using this technique, will you return to your usual routine or will you stick with the flamish one?

I am so curious because Im studying at the Vienna academy of applied arts and no one is using it .....

anyway you achieved excellent results, congratulations!!!!

best regards

Andy