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CarlyHardy
10-04-2000, 03:52 PM
Hi Pat, and welcome to WetCanvas! I just answered your message at ArtAnonymous and was going to suggest you check out the forums here at wetcanvas, too! Take a look at some of the lessons posted by Larry Seiler..I remember one where he talks about light and how to capture it in the painting..in fact, all of his lessons are excellent!

I paint with acrylics, too!
carly

Pray
10-05-2000, 12:32 AM
Hi everyone. Glad to meet you. I was wondering if anyone knows how to attain the brilliant, luminous, light in so many visionary, mystical or spiritual works - i.e. angels. I've been told airbrush only by some and slow dry glaze with badger by others. My attempts using adjacent color to "pop" the light hasn't worked because the rest of the painting has to be too dark. Any help is appreciated. Thanx http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gifPat

Keith Russell
11-29-2000, 08:45 PM
Greetings:

airbrush is a tool, and you can use it to do anything you want. I've painted almost exclusively with airbrush since 1982.

The best way to achieve colour intensity with airbrush painting is to paint a layer of opaque colour, then paint a layer of transparent colour (either the same or similar colour) over the top of the opaque layer.

I have only done this with airbrush, it might work with more traditional methods of applying colour, as well.

Keith.

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Keith Russell
Synthetic Sky Studios
Science Fiction Fine Art
[email protected]

Pray
11-30-2000, 01:42 AM
Thank you Keith. Since I posted this I've been told the only way to acheive what I'm looking for is air brush because the molecules aren't flattened and refract more. Would you agree? I'm trying to get that really white-light effect. Using gold at all adjacent violet gives a more "earthly" look of bright sun instead of supernatural light.

LDianeJohnson
12-05-2000, 07:20 PM
Dear Pray,
Welcome aboard! One other aspect in addition to our fellow WC members have mentioned is your surface. If your surface is very absorbant, the brilliance is lessened. If you seal the area you wish to bring the most brightness to first, even with a mat finish, it will "come up" more brightly than using on bare canvas/illustration board.

Keith Russell
01-11-2001, 08:03 PM
Pray:

Agreed; surface is critical.

I paint only on 'hot-press', acid-free illustration board. The surface is super-smooth, and allows really smooth areas of colour, shading, and tone. I paint using Iwata's Custom-Micron series airbrushes, which give the finest possible spray pattern.

The smooth surface accentuates this quality, whereas even the finest 'tooth' would ruin it.

Where I need texture in my work, I create myself.

Keith.

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Keith Russell
Synthetic Sky Studios
Science Fiction Fine Art
[email protected]