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jackiesimmonds
08-28-2002, 11:58 AM
Ok here goes, a small series of a Still Life with fruits, which anyone fairly new to pastels might enjoy trying. It was Lesson 5 in my book , so there are some earlier lessons on trying out different techniques. Let's assume you know that you can use both the point, and the side of the pastel to work with, and have practised with both. The fruits are placed on a white cloth with folds in it, and it is lit by a spotlight from the right.

Step 1. On a grey piece of pastel paper, sketch the objects with charcoal, and using the side of the charcoal, create the shadow areas - the light was coming from the right. Soften the charcoal with your finger and fix the drawing.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/28-Aug-2002/step1.JPG
Step 2. Using the side of the pastel, stroke a nice dark blue- red onto the shadow sides of the apples and strawberries, and allow some of the red to drift over the outlines and onto the cloth in places. Use a greenish-yellow for the side planes of the banana. Stroke the side of a blue-grey pastel onto the shadow areas in the cloth. Keep your touch quite light - this is important, so that you don't clog the paper too soon.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/28-Aug-2002/step2.JPG
Step 3. Still using the sides of the pastels, use some orangey-red for the illuminated sides and tops of the fruits, softening the colour into the dark red here and there with your finger. Then use bright yellow, with broken strokes, perhaps using the blunt edge of the pastel, for the top plane of the banana and the top of the big apple. Use the point of a dark green pastel to create little short strokes for the leaves of the strawberries.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/28-Aug-2002/step3.JPG

Step 4. (lots of little steps, really!)
Work on the white tablecloth. Begin with a cream pastel (this makes "white cloth with warm light from a spotlight"!) Use cross-hatching or feathering (using the point of the pastel to make lines which criss-cross each osther), and allow some of the lines to work over the shadows, this will "knit" them in a bit. Finally use some white, for the highlights on the cloth. Dot dark red and bright yellow onto the strawberries to suggest texture; use charcoal for the apple stalks and banana ends, and a few small strokes of charcoal over the dark red of the front apple to suggest a darket facet. Use a little dark green on the shadow side of the big apple, and some curving linear strokes (point of the pastel) of yellow to suggest pattern on the skin and the shape of the apple. Put highlights on the fruits with tiny strokes of white and cream.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/28-Aug-2002/step4.JPG

Well, I do hope you found this useful. It isn't such an exciting image as that wonderful landscape at the beginning of the thread, but it does give you a chance to flex some technique muscles, and perhaps you might have learned a little about textures, colour, and how to get a feeling of light on the subject, using strong contrasts.

sandge
08-28-2002, 02:56 PM
Great demo - deserves a thread of it's own so hey presto! Thanks for sharing this, Jackie! :D

gmc
08-28-2002, 03:00 PM
Jackie,

This is wonderful.!! How nice of you to share like this.

I am assuming that you, like so many others, do not know the name of the pastel you are using and/or the color or number or brand.

After they are broken into the size you need all brand names go out and color and value of said color come into play.

This will be most helpful to all of us.

Thanks again,

geri

jackiesimmonds
08-28-2002, 03:20 PM
Yup, you are quite right, I couldn't tell you exactly what I have used... but I can tell you that my boxes here are full of Schminke, Rowney and Unison. I don't use many other brands, as I find these are consistently good quality. Having said that, I don't have access to some of your wonderful US brands, like Terry Ludwig, who sent me a sample box of greens, which are gorgeous. I really ought to use Winsor & Newton - they have used my images on some of their boxes! However, I am not entirely happy with the quality of some of their sticks either, which are sometimes hard and scratchy. (I have mentioned this to them!) Anyway - thanks for moving this to another thread all of its own, and I hope it is a help to someone out there.

Click here for my "aboutme" page, and auctions, on ebay (http://members.ebay.com/aboutme/jackie4art/.)

Click on the www. button below for my website.

olika
08-28-2002, 04:24 PM
Thank you very much for posting this demo. The pastels you are using in this one are soft? And is the grey paper essential ?

jackiesimmonds
08-28-2002, 06:06 PM
yes, I have used soft pastels, though you could do it with hard sticks too, provided they arent too shiny and difficult to use on their sides. It is always easier to put soft over hard; soft pastels can be gently stroked over other colours. The grey paper isn't essential - you could try another neutral colour - but it wont work well on white or cream, because you would have to work so heavily to cover up all the white bits which would show through the reds. The soft grey really complements the warm colours in the piece, and is generally by far the easiest colour paper for a pastellist to use, because it wont argue with the subject matter at all. You could, however, try this, for fun, on a strong bright colour, say, or a dark paper, and see how it would differ in its finished result- and it certainly would. Good experiment! Incidentally - the paper is Canson Mi Teinte, used on the smoother side. The other side is OK to use, but you get a much more textured look. Neither is wrong - it is personal choice.
Jackie

maverick
08-30-2002, 08:12 PM
Hey, this is fabulous. How'd I miss it before?

I find demonstrations like this very effective for increasing my skills.

Thank you very much.

labang
08-31-2002, 08:23 AM
Thanks Jackie for sharing this with us, I will have a go at it.

Elly

Lenore
08-31-2002, 11:03 AM
Thanks so much for sharing this. Living where I am, I get so excited when I find a new demo because we don't have a lot available to us here. I really do appreciate it.

Lenore

jackiesimmonds
08-31-2002, 02:23 PM
I am so pleased you all enjoyed this little demo. As it comes from my book, it is fairly easy to duplicate, so when I have a free moment, I will post another one.
By the way ... in case you are interested, do have a look in the message forums, in Swap Shop and Bargain Basement, (cannot remember which one, sorry)for my thread which show a large number of images - prints of garden and still life scenes, done using quite different techniques, which you might find interesting. As pastellists, it is always fun to look at other images, isn't it.
Jackie.
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jackiesimmonds
09-12-2002, 02:43 PM
Forgot to say - if you did use this and found it helpful, and would like to see another one, just let me know.
Jackie

jenrou
09-12-2002, 03:01 PM
Enjoyed your demo!

Jackie, I received your book yesterday, and I'm sure I will benefit from it. Thanks!:)

Joee
09-12-2002, 03:01 PM
Hi Jackie,

Loved the demo. If you could do more, I for one would greatly appreciate it.

-Joe-

jackiesimmonds
09-13-2002, 03:05 AM
Originally posted by jenrou
Enjoyed your demo!

Jackie, I received your book yesterday, and I'm sure I will benefit from it. Thanks!:)

Dear Jean,
I truly hope so. Don't forget - read the text as well as look at the pictures! That's really important.
any questions, you know where I am.
Jackie:)

Joee
09-13-2002, 05:58 PM
Hi Jackie,

Well you've got me hooked. I'm trying to follow your demo. I set up my own still life of fruit on a light blue bed sheet as I work better from life than from photos. Your instructions are very valuable. The exercise is good even if the painting doesn't turn out. Thanks.

-Joe-

Joee
09-13-2002, 06:09 PM
Hi Jackie,

Well you've got me hooked. I'm trying to follow your demo. I set up my own still life of fruit on a light blue bed sheet as I work better from life than from photos. Your instructions are very valuable. The exercise is good even if the painting doesn't turn out. Thanks.

-Joe-

arizona
09-14-2002, 12:50 AM
Jackie, thank you for sharing your demos with us. I printed it out to try later and would love to see more.

jackiesimmonds
09-14-2002, 02:06 PM
Glad you people are enjoying this little still life demo. It is fun to set up something SIMILAR, and have a go, using the main principles I have laid out.

I will pr0obably post more demos, after next week, as they seem to be so appreciated. Watch this space!!

Jackie
........................

do visit my ebay page and auctions (http://members.ebay.com/aboutme/jackie4art/.)

visit my website which has a “troubleshooter” page of helpful pastel tips and hints (http://www.jackiesimmonds.co.uk)

Also see my posts in The Artists Marketplace here at WC!

becky2
09-14-2002, 07:22 PM
I have been looking for another book to practice pasteling, but can't find any more that I have already seen. What is the title of your book?

I would like to look at this. What other subjects would you suggest to use the grey paper? The demo helped a lot for me.

I didnt know that Windsor and Newton also made pastel. I have their watercolors and I love them. Need to seek out their pastels! How much do they run.

Pabs
05-28-2007, 12:46 PM
Jackie this is a great demo and good excercise, but I was really taken by the comments on not brand names, just the colours needed, as long as they were of a quality that you were comfortable with.
This may seem a simple, obvious statement to some, but it made me sit down and think, which can only be a good thing, and a bonus when thrown in with the lessons learnt form the demo.
Regards,
Pabs

Pabs
06-01-2007, 07:04 AM
Just thought some might like this idea:
To have a regular go at fruit still lifes, I use plastic fruit (don't laugh), some of which can be very realistic. Advantages of this are that it gives you a good grounding in the basic shape of the various fruits; they do not rot etc so then can be kept in position for a longer time; they are very easily "blue-tacked" together so as not to fall about when you move them or put them away for a while.
Once you have the basic shapes, you could always add variety and detail from real fruit.
Just an idea - hope it helps some.
Regards,
Pabs