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Nata
06-10-2009, 01:22 PM
My last delivery of frames came with acrylic glazing (have never used this before) and to my horror, the glazing draws the pastel dust like a magnet:mad:

Apart from changing to standard glass again, is there any way to prevent this from happening? Maybe there is some anti-static treatment for acrylic glazing?

Deborah Secor
06-10-2009, 01:46 PM
There is, yes, but it won't be terribly satisfying without plenty of space between the top of the painting and the back of the acrylic. I have a product called 'Tend' that is an anti-static cleaner, but that's here in the US. Perhaps there's a local product you can find. Call a nearby framer to ask what they use.

I suggest using acrylic glazing over fixed pastel paintings, so if you decide to keep use it you might look for some of the new SpectraFix to spray fix your paintings first. You can have it shipped without the alcohol and reconstitute it.

It might be easier to get glass instead.

Deborah

bluefish
06-11-2009, 07:33 AM
Collect all those 'little static charges' randomly dispersed on the acrylic sheet with a wet soft cloth - the 'little charges' will collect on the wet cloth,travel though your body( hope you don't mind) and into the ground, where they live! Dry off the acrylic very lightly, not to build more charges and frame your pastel - been utilizing acrylic glazing for years - best product outside of the most expensive museum glass! Hope this helps! "try it, you'll like it"!

'blue....' :thumbsup:

DAK723
06-11-2009, 09:17 AM
As mentioned, make sure there is a space (either spacers, that you can buy, or an inner mat or two, between your art and the glazing. I would recommend, if you are ordering online and their glazing is the very thin acrylic, that you don't get those in the future and get 1/8" thick, UV protective acrylic from a framer.

I use this spray for anti-static. You may be able to get something similar from a photo supply store.

http://www.pictureframes.com/html/cleaner.html

Don

timonsloane
06-11-2009, 12:20 PM
For some time I used acrylic when framing. I used an anti-static spray that I got at an office supply store (they sell it primarily for cleaning computer monitors).

I had good success and little trouble with dust attaching to the glazing.

But I moved to museum glass some time ago and haven't looked back. There is so much more clarity in the painting and the colors are simply more vivid. I really think it helped my sales as well. In two cases I went back and reframed an older piece under museum, and both pieces sold at my next show.

To make it more affordable I buy the glass by the case and cut it myself. Intimidating at first, but it's really not that hard to do. I just taught myself by watching youtube videos on glass cutting :-)

bluefish
06-11-2009, 02:20 PM
Don makes a very good point above - use 1/8" thick (.125") acrylic sheets, not the cheap, flimsy stuff - I use spacers and also frame direct on the acrylic! - also have framed direct on non-glare acrylic and they are SOLD!

If you were a watercolorist, I'd recommend UV acrylic but for pastels or acrylic paint on paper, regular acrylic glazing is fine - it gets rid of most UV rays, unlike glass!

If you want to purchase the so called anti-static spray,fine but the wet cloth will get the job done - there is only one know product that will dissipate static charge and keep it away from other plastic but it's expensive and not teated for our application - The Plastic Industry spent a considerable sum of money with IGT(Institute of Gas Technology) in Chicago to develope a spray that would prevent static charge from building up on plastic natural gas pipe, with the explosive hazard involved - it works and works great but it's never been tested on acrylic glazing! When the Natural Gas Industry cuts into one of their plastic pipes, they wrap the pipe in wet burlap and make sure it's in contact with the bare ground - the same principal I described above - it goes on every day all over the world!

'blue....' :thumbsup:

Dougwas
06-11-2009, 04:58 PM
I have a question regarding acrylic and/or glass when using the SpectraFix. Would you still have to use spacers or would the painting be fixed enough that spacers would be no longer needed?

Doug

bluefish
06-11-2009, 05:32 PM
Doug

Haven't tried it on SpectraFix(I have a lot more experimenting with it before I'm sold that it is a final fix) but I use Lascaux and no spacers - it works !

'blue....' :thumbsup:

saramathewson
06-11-2009, 08:49 PM
Do any of you have problems with scratches on the acrylic glazing? Does it happen more with the thin flimsy stuff that comes with the frames? I have many watercolors framed with this and most of them have been scratched. I need to replace them all now with glass or thicker acryllic. I haven't framed any of my pastels yet, though I will have to soon enough. It is good to know you have had such good results Blue!

Sara

DAK723
06-11-2009, 08:57 PM
Do any of you have problems with scratches on the acrylic glazing? Does it happen more with the thin flimsy stuff that comes with the frames? I have many watercolors framed with this and most of them have been scratched. I need to replace them all now with glass or thicker acryllic. I haven't framed any of my pastels yet, though I will have to soon enough. It is good to know you have had such good results Blue!

Sara

It probably happens more with the flimsy stuff, but, yes, the acrylic does scratch, in my experience. I wouldn't say it was noticeable once the piece is framed, however.

Don

Nata
06-14-2009, 07:50 AM
Thank you so much for all your replies:thumbsup:

When I do not want to use mats I use spacers in the form of flat slip-frames under glass.
This time I opted for the normal glass but will try museum glass and thicker acrylic if I can find it. I guess it would not be as easy to cut as the thinner acrylic sheets. As for the anti-static sprays or wipes I was told, that they only gave a temporary result. I may eventually end up with a ghost image of my pastel painting on the glazing:rolleyes:

chewie
05-25-2012, 04:45 PM
Doug
t I use Lascaux and no spacers - it works !

'blue....' :thumbsup:

so you put the piece directly against the glazing??

bluefish
05-28-2012, 01:38 PM
yes, I've done it in the past, without a known problem, but as explained in another thread, I'd recomend the utilization of spacers due to the coefficient of linear expansion of the plastic......much safer over the long life of the painting with spacers......:thumbsup:

when I direct applied the plastic, I sealed the area around the outside of the plastic/paper with plastic clear tape to eliminate moisture intrusion......it seems to work fine but from my left side engineering brain, the spacers are the correct way to go......we need the National Lab to do some research on the sliding of the plastic across the surface of a pastel painting due to expansion/contraction.......the Lab results will answer this question for us.....in the mean time, a safe solution would be to utilize the spacers....

'blue :wave: