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loppysox
05-11-2009, 10:58 AM
Hello,
first post :)

I want to build up large areas. What would be a good value but durable material to do this with? I've used artists' texture pastes before, but the cost would be prohibitive on such a scale. Is there a cheaper alternative? For that matter, just what exactly are they made from; I see that they are described as " marble paste made of marble dust and 100% polymer emulsion" .

Bright Eyes
05-11-2009, 02:43 PM
I use a lot of different gels and textures in my paintings. There are so many that do so many different things its hard to say what would work best without you trying them out. Here are a couple I could suggest:

Golden light molding paste. This paste is really soft but gets great volume without all the extra weight. A couple layers of heavy gel over the top will make it nice and hard once its the way you like it.
http://www.dickblick.com/products/golden-molding-paste-mediums/

And there is the Golden heavy gel. This is has a lot more wight but works better if you want to see through the texture:
http://www.dickblick.com/products/golden-acrylic-gel-mediums/

These are just a couple I would suggest right off the top of my head. If you read down the page on the links you'll see the description of a lot of different gels and pastes that Golden makes. I've used most of these so if you have any questions on an individual gel I might be able to help you. My personal favorite molding paste to use is the Interactive Acrylics pastes and gels. They are a little softer and absorb the paint differently. Here is a link to them if you might be interested:
http://www.jerrysartarama.com/discount-art-supplies/Acrylic-Paints-and-Mediums/Chroma-Acrylics-and-Mediums/Chroma-Atelier-Interactive-Artists-Acrylic-Mediums/Chroma-Atelier-Interactive-Mediums-and-Additives.htm

These are all good high quality gels and pastes. The only brand I've tried and didn't like is liquitex. The gel yellows over a 4 month time:eek: So I don't use that brand. Haven't had any problems with golden or chroma brands. And if you compare prices to other brands they are well priced.
Hopes this helps a bit.

idylbrush
05-11-2009, 03:34 PM
Liquitex makes a stucco medium that is interesting as well and it doesn't seem to yellow for some reason. I have pieces that are several years old and there hasn't been a shift or crack yet.

I tend to not venture to far from the artists lines. You may think about using Matisse out of Australia or Kroma out of Canada. They may have a price advantage. Jerrys has Matisse and you have to search around for Kroma.

Bright Eyes
05-11-2009, 04:39 PM
Liquitex makes a stucco medium that is interesting as well and it doesn't seem to yellow for some reason. I have pieces that are several years old and there hasn't been a shift or crack yet.

I've used this one and really liked it. Its the clear gels that yellowed on me. I put some baby foot prints on a panel with about 1/4 inch thick of heavy clear gel. It sat for a few months. I pulled it out the other day and it has yellowed. Opaque gels would probably be fine.

AllisonR
05-11-2009, 06:22 PM
I second the goldens recommendations. My canvases are generally 1-2 meters, so I can go through a quart or two of a gel on one canvas if I try. But you say it is so large it would be cost prohibitive? What kind of scale are we talking about?

If you mean REALLY HUGE, if you went to the art supply store and told them "I want to buy 4 gallons, what kind of discount can you offer", I bet you'll get less than retail. Maybe google polymer emulsion, find out what it is and if you can get it somewhere else for less? Though I'd be careful about quality. Do you want an archival quality, or something for a short period, in which case a cheap version would be fine.

loppysox
05-12-2009, 01:22 PM
Well since texture paste is no more than marble dust in an emulsion, it makes sense that you could make your own for peanuts, by using your own marble dust, and producing something equivalent to the artist's quality pastes, but at a fraction of the cost. Has anyone tried to do this?

Einion
05-12-2009, 01:53 PM
WWell since texture paste is no more than marble dust in an emulsion, it makes sense that you could make your own for peanuts, by using your own marble dust, and producing something equivalent to the artist's quality pastes, but at a fraction of the cost.
What would you be using for the binder? This will be the primary cost that one would need to factor in right at the outset.

As for it making a true equivalent, you do have to figure out how you'll incorporate the dry powder very thoroughly into the wet component; small amounts are not difficult at all, but when you get to very stiff consistencies it gets to be a lot more effort (so factor in the time it takes too).

I've done this on a small scale a few times; it's not something I'd want to do often or in large quantities :)

Einion

Phantelope
05-12-2009, 06:30 PM
don't know what you're working on, but I'd either contact Golden directly and ask for what they'd suggest and what price you could get for large quantities. Or I'd go to the hardware store and get materials used to put texture on walls. You'd have to work on stiff wooden board, but once you get heavy with texture materials canvas is pretty much out of the question anyway.

An other approach might be to use thick acrylic house paint, which should hold up ok too. I've also used those foam sprays they use for insulation or mounting windows. Can't remember what they are called, mostly come out yellow and rise like dough once out of the can, many can be sanded/cut after the fact.

Will they last a hundred years? Do I care? Maybe and no :-)

Plaster also comes to mind, or that stuff they make a cast for your broken bone from, can't think of the name in English right now.

loppysox
05-13-2009, 02:33 AM
Plaster also comes to mind, or that stuff they make a cast for your broken bone from, can't think of the name in English right now.

In England we call it Plaster of Paris. Another option is papier mache (what's with all these French-sounding names?), which I see can be bought in a pourable form, although I think it's not quite the same stuff.

Einion
05-13-2009, 08:17 AM
Plaster is heavy and brittle. Plus I don't think it would bond well enough to a support/primer surface.

loppysox, what would you be using for the binder?

Einion

loppysox
05-13-2009, 11:10 AM
what would you be using for the binder?

Einion

Einion, in the past I have used regular acrylic paints and gels to mix with decorators 'filler'.