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halthepainter
05-05-2009, 03:07 PM
A goodly number of oil and acrylic painters paint with three colors and white.

I would love to see examples of what other artists do with their three colors and white.

I routinely use 5 colors and white but experimented with a three color palette of burnt sienna, ultramarine blue, and cad yellow medium and titanium white. I was going for a dark scene in acrylics and this was the result:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-May-2009/140488-wc_quite_anchorage.jpg

Would you tell us what three color palette you use and show an example of your work.

Andrew
05-05-2009, 03:30 PM
Quite a bit actually. My typical palette is a single primary with rarely the addition of a secondary. These examples are just a couple of quickies and are oil on 8x6 inch canvas. The palette for these was Aliz Crimson, Cad. yellow lt, and Ultra blue.

Andrew

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-May-2009/5978-Still_Life.jpg http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-May-2009/5978-Yellow_Pepper.jpg

halthepainter
05-05-2009, 03:37 PM
Earlier I saw an example of a painter from Hawaii using the same three colors as you do. It was what made me want to see the work others were doing with three colors and white.

Nice work.

Einion
05-05-2009, 04:00 PM
Thread from December last on the same subject, What 3 "Primary" paints can achieve... (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=536646) with links to some artists' work.

There are a number of older threads on limited palettes for anyone interested in having a look. Links to a few in this post (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?p=7061280#post7044496).

Einion

halthepainter
05-05-2009, 05:04 PM
Thread from December last on the same subject, What 3 "Primary" paints can achieve... (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=536646) with links to some artists' work.

There are a number of older threads on limited palettes for anyone interested in having a look. Links to a few in this post (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?p=7061280#post7044496).
Einion

Einion, thank you for the links. I added the post with the limited palette links to my favoirites list so I can refer back to it.

Also in the first link, I added the Mother child post to my favorites also. The result with three watercolors was amazing. I thought that, with watercolor, you had to have more colors.

Thank you.

I still hope we can get our artists who paint with three colors to show us their finished work. There are some who paint with congruent colors and others who use split primaries. It would be great to have a thread where we could compare the finished art of a number of artists who use various three color palettes. Seeing the finished product, I would think, would more instructive than just seeing their color wheels.

solonite
05-06-2009, 08:48 AM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-May-2009/114729-snappingturtlewip.jpg
3 colors only

halthepainter
05-06-2009, 10:17 AM
Delightful solonite. Please tell us your three colors.

Really that is a fun painting. Wonderful.

budigart
05-07-2009, 09:57 AM
For limited palette enthusiasts, I recomment a book titled The Big Book of Oil Color by Jose Parramon. It contains a whole section of explanations, with photos, of some of the many color combinations that can be mixed with cad yellow medium, alizarin crimson, Prussian blue and white.

I played with this basic CMY palette off and on for a few years. It taught me that, in a pinch, you can get by with only four tubes of paint. Of course, a palette like this can, and does teach how wide a range of colors/values can be made from the basics.

Parramon's book has been out of print for some time, but I have found it on several used book web sites. The color section of this book is worth the price.

rltromble
05-07-2009, 10:40 AM
Interesting, I might have to look for that one.

knfmkr
05-08-2009, 11:41 AM
I use a primary three color pallet as mentioned but with a different approach. I use a cool and warm of each color, such as a warm red and a cool red. I lay my pallet out with white in the upper right corner, moving down to the lower right are the blues, lower left the reds and upper left the yellows.

My yellows are cad lemon and cad light.
My reds are Aliz and cad red med.
My blues are ultramarine and Viridian.

When Painting plein air which is mostly what I do theses days I will add Raw Umber to the pallet to make some beautiful darks.

My medium is Copal Painting Medium

Einion
05-08-2009, 12:03 PM
I use a primary three color pallet as mentioned but with a different approach. I use a cool and warm of each color, such as a warm red and a cool red.
Not to point out the obvious but this is a six-colour palette (seven including white) ;)

This is normally called a split-primary or twin-primary palette... assuming it included two blues instead of a blue and a green, as you've listed.

Einion

knfmkr
05-08-2009, 12:13 PM
As stated

I use a primary three color pallet as mentioned but with a different approach.

Just my one and only contibution.:wave: :wave:

Einion
05-08-2009, 12:49 PM
This is not a semantics issue: you listed the paints, it's not a three-colour primary palette, end of story.

Work done with seven-colour palettes is a subject for another thread, which anyone is free to open if they would like to.

Einion

sidbledsoe
05-08-2009, 03:00 PM
I have used, burnt sienna, ultra blue, yellow ochre, several times here is one, 8x10:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-May-2009/112587-IMGP1789.JPG
George Cherepov was an artist who sometimes used what he called his minor palette, indian red, yellow ochre, prussian blue, here is one:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-May-2009/112587-IMGP1787.JPG
I don't like prussian blue or indian red as I find them both too strong for my liking. I have also used just red, yellow, and blue but am more comfortable with lower chroma earths.

halthepainter
05-08-2009, 03:15 PM
I have used, burnt sienna, ultra blue, yellow ochre, several times here is one, 8x10:

George Cherepov was an artist who sometimes used what he called his minor palette, indian red, yellow ochre, prussian blue, here is one:


Thank you sidbledsoe. This is exactly the kind of answers I was hoping for.

Your painting is beautiful and I like your palette but Gerorge Cherepov's painting and his "minor palette" really rings my chimes. I definately want to give that palette a try. Of course I love large value changes in a painting, perhaps that is a large part of Cherepov's painting's appeal for me.

sidbledsoe
05-08-2009, 03:22 PM
George is at the very top of my list, if you want to explore his methods etc. search ebay for books by him and with Wendon Blake. They also are my favorite art instructions books. There are a couple of threads in oils and plein air about the movie, "Local Color" that is being rereleased soon, about him and a young man named George Gallo who dogged him until Cherepov would let him study under him, I am quite envious of that guy.

halthepainter
05-08-2009, 03:28 PM
George is at the very top of my list, if you want to explore his methods etc. search ebay for books by him and with Wendon Blake. They also are my favorite art instructions books. There are a couple of threads in oils and plein air about the movie, "Local Color" that is being rereleased soon, about him and a young man named George Gallo who dogged him until Cherepov would let him study under him, I am quite envious of that guy.

Thank you for the heads up on the movie "Local Color." I hadn't realized it was based on a true story and your reference to George's "minor palette" makes that a must see movie for me. I'll see if I can find any books by Cherepov.

Thanks again.

sidbledsoe
05-08-2009, 05:56 PM
No problem Hal, back in the eighties there were many variations of these books by him. They had a complete one in this form:http://cgi.ebay.com/The-Oil-Painting-Book-by-Wendon-Blake-George-Cherepov_W0QQitemZ370168055231QQcmdZViewItemQQptZUS_Nonfiction_Book?hash=item562fbc45bf&_trksid=p3286.m20.l1116
That they split up and sold as paperbacks, one landscape, one general, one seascape, etc. This one has all of the material in it. Blake was just the writer, describing George's methods, palette, step by steps. But George also did one on his own:http://cgi.ebay.com/Discovering-Oil-Painting-by-George-Cherepov_W0QQitemZ200313730198QQcmdZViewItemQQptZUS_Nonfiction_Book?hash=item2ea3a0f496&_trksid=p3286.m20.l1116
Those two are the crux of it, skip the variations if possible. Here is the trailer for the movie:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cNagBpfpB70
he changed the names and added a little drama probably. I found one more, same minor palette:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-May-2009/112587-IMGP1790.JPG

halthepainter
05-08-2009, 07:20 PM
No problem Hal, back in the eighties there were many variations of these books by him. They had a complete one in this form:http://cgi.ebay.com/The-Oil-Painting-Book-by-Wendon-Blake-George-Cherepov_W0QQitemZ370168055231QQcmdZViewItemQQptZUS_Nonfiction_Book?hash=item562fbc45bf&_trksid=p3286.m20.l1116


That they split up and sold as paperbacks, one landscape, one general, one seascape, etc. This one has all of the material in it. Blake was just the writer, describing George's methods, palette, step by steps. But George also did one on his own:http://cgi.ebay.com/Discovering-Oil-Painting-by-George-Cherepov_W0QQitemZ200313730198QQcmdZViewItemQQptZUS_Nonfiction_Book?hash=item2ea3a0f496&_trksid=p3286.m20.l1116
Those two are the crux of it, skip the variations if possible. Here is the trailer for the movie:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cNagBpfpB70
he changed the names and added a little drama probably.


Thank you Sid, after reading your earlier post, I looked up George on the Barnes and Noble used book market. I placed and order for a number of the books listed there. Thanks for the advice about the book being split up into a couple different publications. I cancelled all that I was ordering except George's "Oil Painting", which I left on, then I purchased the book on ebay from your first link.

Sid you're a Saint. Thanks for the help. :angel: :thumbsup:

awerth
05-14-2009, 08:41 AM
The Trenton, NJ, based artist Mel Leipzig (who currently has a retrospective at the NJ State Museum in Trenton and who shows at Gallery Henoch in New York) has painted almost exclusively with 3 pigments plus white for the last 15-20 years. I know he has changed the pigments once or twice, but at one point he was using quinacridone crimson, cobalt blue, Hansa yellow medium, and titanium white (all Golden Acrylics).

For an article on his process from American Artist (2003): http://www.allbusiness.com/services/museums-art-galleries-botanical-zoological/4358145-1.html (It's a strange URL for this article, but it works...)

For images of his paintings, see Gallery Henoch: http://www.galleryhenoch.com/index3.html?artists/leipzig/leipzig.html~mainFrame

(If you happen to be near Trenton, New Jersey, the show at the state museum is definitely worth seeing, up through Sep 6, 2009: http://www.state.nj.us/state/museum/see_mel.htm ).

halthepainter
06-10-2009, 10:51 PM
Sidbledsoe brought up the Cherepov mininal palette of: Indian red, yellow ochre, and prussian blue and I gave it a try. I was surprised that, with white, the range of colors I was able to get. The three dark colors mixed well to make great darks.

The first painting is from our reference library. I just finished it and haven't analyzed it as yet to see what corrections I need to make. It is an 8 by 10 inch acrylic on stretched canvas. Suggestions welcome.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/10-Jun-2009/140488-wc_three_colors.jpg

The second painting is a plein air painting of Portsmouth, NH. However I decided to try an oil for the first time in many years and it is still a work in progress. I rushed the process and made mud. I should have waited a few days and perhaps used some retouch varnish to seal the surface before adding another layer. (Same three color palette as above) It was a fun exercise but I'll go back to my five color palette. I was pretty limited in the greens I could mix. I couldn't get any cool greens with this palette.

The painting is an 11 by 14 inch, oil, on gessoed masonite.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/10-Jun-2009/140488-wc_oil_ports_harbor.jpg
The dark spot at the top of the painting is from the easel. The painting is still on the easel.

Suggestions welcome.

sidbledsoe
06-11-2009, 10:37 AM
Hal,
Thanks a lot for posting your examples, they are really nice and show plenty of chroma, as much as I would need.

LynnDigby
06-18-2009, 03:01 PM
I was messing with a variation of a three color palette in this piece, but my 'primaries' weren't exactly primary.

I used ivory black, (stand in for blue)
cad red, medium
yellow ochre

and titanium white.

This was a kind of experiment, and I found it suited this particular painting, since I didn't need a vast range of blues and greens. The subtle ones could be achieved (sort of) by mixing black with yellow or with white. Against the reds, these read as bluish (on her shirt) or greenish (didn't need this here) - all I needed for a portrait that was primarily warm.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/18-Jun-2009/71979-Trudy-web.jpg

halthepainter
06-18-2009, 03:27 PM
Wow Lynn!! That is absolutely fantastic. I have run across other painters who have used their black for a blue in a limited palette. Your painting is wonderful and thank you for participating is this thread.

kevinwueste
06-18-2009, 09:03 PM
Hey Lynn! long time no .. write ? love that painting!! cheers, kevin

LarrySeiler
06-18-2009, 11:12 PM
I've been playing with the limited palette now since January of 2006...

here are several, making my own darks with Utrecht Fr Ultramarine Blue, a bit of Cadmium Lemon Yellow...sometimes a touch of red.

But my three colors used here are that...the Fr Ultramarine Blue, Cadmium Lemon Yellow, and W&N Bright Red...plus white...no black.

here are several...all small studies...

5"x 7" ...painting of Juneau, Alaska...

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/18-Jun-2009/532-juneaualaska_threepluswhite.jpg


7"x 5" oil...dog tags..

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/18-Jun-2009/532-dogtags_threepluswhite.jpg


8"x 10" oil... Winter Tree...

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/18-Jun-2009/532-argonnetree_threepluswhite.jpg

halthepainter
06-18-2009, 11:17 PM
Hi Larry beautiful work. I knew you often used a limited palette from other forums. I'm glad you looked in and contributed.

Einion
06-19-2009, 05:12 AM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/18-Jun-2009/71979-Trudy-web.jpg
Thanks for posting that Lynn, lovely work! Very nice handling of the fleshtones.

This was a kind of experiment, and I found it suited this particular painting, since I didn't need a vast range of blues and greens. The subtle ones could be achieved (sort of) by mixing black with yellow or with white. Against the reds, these read as bluish (on her shirt) or greenish (didn't need this here) - all I needed for a portrait that was primarily warm.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/20-Aug-2003/3842-thumbsup.gif

It is surprising often how believable colour can be with very restrictive palettes, as long as the subject is suitable (like here). With any three primaries you can hit all the hues, which is a good start, although chroma can be very restricted in certain areas. With black in place of blue things are obviously much more constrained than with any true blue but it can still work.


http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/18-Jun-2009/532-juneaualaska_threepluswhite.jpg
Love the colour in this Larry.

Einion

LarrySeiler
06-19-2009, 10:35 AM
It is surprising often how believable colour can be with very restrictive palettes, as long as the subject is suitable (like here).
Einion


Emile Gruppe commented in his book on Color...that near any color scheme will work so long as the values are done well. So long as one's darkest dark (mine being the Utrecht Fr. Ultramarine Blue) is rich and dark enough...then much is possible to extend that value range and operate as Gruppe suggests.

I have added a couple other colors over the years experiment with the limited palette as supplements...such as Naples Yellow and viridian...though not always used...though I play with my version/interpretation of Zorn's palette and when I do as you know, use black, yellow orcre, red and white. Thing is again...a limited palette has to really have consideration to be value driven...

Perhaps too...that push for values makes the limited palette also a good choice for novice to intermediate painters, and will build good foundation and habits. As I have oft said, all else considered, 90% of the time something isn't quite right with a painting, it comes down to an issue with values. Said for the benefit of lurkers or others here as I know you well understand Einion! ;)

Larry

LynnDigby
06-19-2009, 10:07 PM
As I have oft said, all else considered, 90% of the time something isn't quite right with a painting, it comes down to an issue with values. Said for the benefit of lurkers or others here as I know you well understand Einion! ;)

Larry

Yes, of course. If you nail the values, the color can be more discretionary. But, it also has to do with relative color. One part must relate to another. Anyway, that's what I think.

It's endlessly fascinating to observe what happens when one color is juxtaposed next to others. I think a limited palette allows the understanding to grow of how to make the palette perform because you are restricted and can't just reach for another tube of color when you have a problem to resolve.

Some of the best work I've seen in oil paintings has been done with very limited palettes.

LarrySeiler
06-20-2009, 08:45 AM
yep....relational color comes naturally too though when each primary finds itself necessary. Tame the bit of green you've made (blue + yellow)...with a touch of the red...you just interwove all color. Happens again and again.

I have found as you say about that "understanding" its a bit like friends. If you have just two or three good friends for much of your life, and your spouse...you know fairly intimately much of all there is to know. The larger you increase your circle...the less you know overall.

Preaching to the choir here, but one becomes so comfortable that this growing you refer to...for me means in fairly short order the gamut of the obvious of what one can do with the limited colors invites playing with strategies.

For example mixing up one pile of a color made, and using it as a mother color to extend its range. For those not quite sure what I mean by that, here is a past thread...and it will surprise some, as one color made at random led to many colors. One comes to feel one is really not so limited as others might suggest...but the limit is more to one's thinking. Here that thread-

http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=437595

and the example demonstrated in that thread is only one strategy. Playing with the limited palette and reading thru Edgar Payne's "Composition of Outdoor Painting" I came to be fairly comfortable with about a half-dozen strategies, such as the split-complementary palette...

I like your last statement too, Lynn...as Gruppe, Payne...Christensen, many others espouse the merits for what can be accomplished with a limited palette.

I think its especially critical for those that paint from life, (and I'm thinking more outdoors on location, where light is not constant and threatens to change)...that one has to come to a place with one eventually relies on their gut hunch or instincts. This, so that the unexpected...the unpredicted, and the many variables of changing visual voices is more easily orchestrated. Knowing your palette intimately is like having fewer instrumentation when a storm takes over and you have to fly the plane manually and by the seat of your pants.

Seems this knowing allows your focus to be on the subject more, and its intricacies and its possibilities and less on the "now how do I do this?" situations. Its hard to master the subject where you are not master of the medium.

peace

Larry

halthepainter
07-08-2009, 04:35 PM
One more effort with prussian blue, yellow ochre and permanent red (I mislaid my Indian Red). So it's almost a Cherepov, minimal palette.

The painting is an 8 by 10 inch acrylic on stretched canvas. It's of the Nubble Light in Cape Neddick, Maine.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Jul-2009/140488-wc_nubble.jpg

Suggestions welcome.

sidbledsoe
07-08-2009, 05:51 PM
Great scene Hal! Is that the lighthouse in Maine that is on all the calendars etc? Here is one I did a while ago, I used ultra blue, viridian, and burnt sienna, watercolors:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Jul-2009/112587-112587-rsz_Sails011.jpg

halthepainter
07-08-2009, 05:58 PM
Hi Sid. Yes that lighthouse is one of the most photographed and painted in New England. I had a request to do that scene for my next art show. Now let's see if the requestor turns up and actually makes a pruchase.

Lovely sailboat Sid. Nice crisp colors. How much masking did you use or were you just careful? :D

sidbledsoe
07-08-2009, 06:26 PM
Yes I know that lighthouse, it is the best.
I used some liquid masking on the sails and that was it. thanks, I started your photo of the roadway but am workin on other now, will post it here later.

sidbledsoe
07-29-2009, 02:01 PM
Hal,
http://buriedwood.blogspot.com/
I was reading in this blog about half way down about David Leffel's recommendation to do limited palette studies with three colors, yellow ochre, venetian red, and prussian blue, quite nearly the same one as Cherepov. Anyway, his thing was to vary them by making the dominant color in the studies lean towards each of the three colors. Just thought it interesting, have been too busy with other stuff but will eventually get to doing something like that and post here, Sid

halthepainter
07-29-2009, 02:31 PM
Hi Sid, good to hear from you. I usually try to make one of my colors dominate and to influence the other colors in my paintings.

I don't remember which artist espoused this technique but he put a little bit of his dominate color in every color mixture he made on his palette. I have done this in a couple paintings and it worked well. I was doing a rosey sunset, harbor scene and put a touch of rosiness in every hue. I was happy with it and it sold a few weeks ago, so I guess someone else liked it.

sidbledsoe
09-14-2009, 12:25 AM
I used a Zorn type palette, cad red light, yellow ochre, ivory black, white, no medium.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Sep-2009/112587-Lions_2.jpg
I am usually starting my greens now with yellow ochre and black and going up in chroma from there, finally feel like they are tamed now, the greens not the lions :D

halthepainter
09-14-2009, 09:35 AM
Sid love your painting. One of these days, when I can catch a lilttle slack I intend to try the Zorn palette.

You did a wonderful job with it.

Also, last weekend I was at an art fair (lousy weather and only sold enough to pay show fees) but each artist put a painting in for judging.

My "Nubble Lighthouse", using the Cherepov palette of yellow ochre, prussian blue, indian red and white won third place.

I had posted that painting earlier in this thread. In fact it's a little way down this page.

sidbledsoe
09-14-2009, 09:54 AM
Great Hal! congratulations on that prize winner! now I will try that palette, I tend to shy away from prussian because I get it all of the place.

LarrySeiler
09-14-2009, 11:30 AM
This weekend, in upper Michigan...I hiked north of the public access called "Wetmore Landing"...to paint a plein air.

Getting to a spot along the rough rocky shoreline of Lake Superior, I squinted my eyes...and determined a warm light and color present. I decided upon a split-complementary palette strategy...which was three colors, yes...plus white.

I chose reddish-orange as my dominant, and the split-complements blue and green...prepared my piles of paint. I chose to create a warmer green, a pile of virdian with cad lemon yellow added to it and Naples Yellow...mixed well with the paint knife. The blue was French Ultramarine blue...and red was W&N Bright Red..

11"x 14" oil...on canvas-

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Sep-2009/532-sept09_wetmorelandingPAwc.jpg

halthepainter
09-14-2009, 11:48 AM
Lovely painting Larry. The painting has a wonderful cohesive feel. The colors all go together so well.

LarrySeiler
09-14-2009, 11:57 AM
thanks Hal... :)

sidbledsoe
09-14-2009, 01:03 PM
The unmistakable Seiler style in this fine painting!

LarrySeiler
09-14-2009, 02:14 PM
very kind, Sid...thanks...and see you've a handle on the Zorn palette!!! Nice mood!

:)

sidbledsoe
09-14-2009, 02:27 PM
Thanks Larry, limiting those colors is kind of like losing a load off your back and streamlines things, I that painting went very quick for me, no more than 2 1/2 hours total.

LarrySeiler
09-14-2009, 03:28 PM
The emphasis of the old time painters that painted outdoors and taught, such as Edgar Payne, Emile Gruppe, John F. Carlson, W. Chase...many was to develop an efficiency whereby one could slip into a gut hunch response or intuitive mode, and that mastering fewer pigments to suggest much brought you to that place quicker than trying to master many pigments "little"

There is more just about anything less will hold in common being few, than the many...and easier to imbue a working harmony and cohesiveness. The efficiency and thus the mastering of manipulating the few alllows the attention to be on the subject, the moment.

I think...there are glimpses of something magical the subject reveals to you when you simplify your methods and come to be fully cognizant and in charge of the moment.

If one is painting from life, especially outdoors...the light can change so abruptly that you can feel suddenly overwhelmed.

I think it is prudent to master a little at a time, then bit by bit add more. When you get to the point that the more and more results increasingly in frustration and losing control...its time to back off...

skorm_ix
11-03-2009, 07:47 PM
^^ i like that. sound words to take to heart. im working on a project at the moment, and im so stuck its not funny. i think im going to try this approach, three colours, and use the paper for white. the question, rather, the problem is choosing colours to work with that wont turn to mush on paper hahaha

skorm_ix
11-03-2009, 07:49 PM
I was messing with a variation of a three color palette in this piece, but my 'primaries' weren't exactly primary.

I used ivory black, (stand in for blue)
cad red, medium
yellow ochre

and titanium white.

This was a kind of experiment, and I found it suited this particular painting, since I didn't need a vast range of blues and greens. The subtle ones could be achieved (sort of) by mixing black with yellow or with white. Against the reds, these read as bluish (on her shirt) or greenish (didn't need this here) - all I needed for a portrait that was primarily warm.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/18-Jun-2009/71979-Trudy-web.jpg


this painting by the way, is fantastic.

halthepainter
12-15-2009, 10:53 PM
For those of us who consider black not to be a color, this painting would be an exercise in two colors plus black and white. However black when mixed with white will normally tint toward red or blue. In this case my black tints as a blue.

I have also been working with oil pastels and this exercise was with Sennelier oil pastels because they are less firm than many other brands and can be blended. I used no solvents but just mixed one pastel stick on top of another on a paper palette.

I've been wanting to try the Swedish painter, Anders Zorn's palette. The Zorn palette is black, white, red and yellow.

A couple examples of Zorn's paintings:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Nov-2009/140488-ref_zorn,_anders.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Nov-2009/140488-ref_zorn_landscape.jpg

I used Sennelier yellow, white, red, and black from the introductory set because they are soft and I could mix them with a palette knife. The yellow in the introductory set is obiviously a lemon yellow where as Zorn's yellow was a warmer yellow, probably a yellow ochre. This lemon yellow allowed me to mix in a smidge of black in the yellow to make an acceptable green. White with a smidge (technical term) of black produced a bluish tint.

The next image was my set up: Paper palette, my four pastels from the introductory set, palette knife, color shaper. I rubbed pastels on the paper palette, one into another and picked up the pigment with the palette knife and spread it on the canvas. The color shaper softened areas of the pigment and smeared it around a bit. The only direct applications of pastel sticks were on the lantern and on the stones, all the rest was with palette knife.


http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Nov-2009/140488-Nov_Wip_lantern.jpg

I used neither solvents nor linseed oil. The painting is on canvas panel, black gesso with a top layer of black gesso and marble dust. Image size it 8 by 10 inches.

Suggestions appreciated.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Nov-2009/140488-lores_Garden_Lantern_2.jpg
__________________

WFMartin
12-20-2009, 01:11 PM
I believe that when one sets out to paint with a very limited palette, one usually has one of several goals in mind. One goal may be simply to learn how many resulting colors one can obtain by using a very bizarre, and unlikely palette. Another goal might be to determine how close to actual reality one can get by using another very unlikely palette.

In these cases, the selection of subject matter seems to contribute a great part to the inevitable success of the choice of those 3 colors.

Another goal might be to see how close to reality one can come, by using 3 colors whose characteristics have been designed, by laws of nature, to achieve such an appearance, and with the choice of subject matter being almost limitless.

In other words, I always ask myself, that if I were to be stranded on a desert island, with no more than 3 colors of paint (plus white), and at the same time be required to faithfully reproduce every color that I may encounter on that island, .....what 3 colors would I want.

The following painting is one that I did, as a challenge on Wet Canvas a long time ago. The challenge was presented to us artists who consider Cyan, Magenta, and Yellow as being the primary colors, and we were virtually challenged to prove that the particular subject offered could, in fact, be painted, using only those 3 colors (which some of us consider the true primary colors), and white.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/20-Dec-2009/13079-Breath_Of_Spring_Final.jpg
"Breath Of Spring"...9" x 12" oil on canvas
This is a lower-resolution photo, so it is a bit pixelized.

While some may have considered this to be an actual "challenge," others of us did not. Creating nearly every color desired by using the primary colors is nothing very remarkable at all, and can be expected to meet with relatively successful results, whever it is employed.

It is really the using of 3 colors that are NOT primary colors to create a realistic-appearing result that is more of a true challenge.

The paints used for this painting are the following: Winsor & Newton Transparent Yellow 653 (for the primary, Yellow). Winsor & Newton Permanent Rose 502 (for the primary, Magenta). Winsor & Newton Winsor Blue (Red Shade) 706 (for the primary, Cyan)
The yellow is PY128. The Magenta is PV19. The Cyan is PB15.

I have since switched my choice for Cyan to Grumbacher Thalo Blue (PB15), but they basically are the same.

The one thing that this "challenge" actually caused me to do was to begin a more careful study of those colors that actually behave the best as primary colors--in other words, the closest colors I could get (in oil paint) to a true Yellow, Magenta, and Cyan. The three that I used were recommended by Winsor & Newton as their primaries, at the time, and they actually seemed to be as correct as anything I could get, without having at my disposal the color-measuring equipment that I used to use, when I was working. I have stuck with them for several years, now, and I consider them to be just about the closest choices for the primary colors. I still find it gratifying that whenever I may be having trouble achieving a color I'm trying to mix with other convenience colors, the reverting back to one, or two of these basics can often solve my problem.

One interesting thing to note is that each of these is a transparent color. Transparent primaries are useful for creating deep, dark colors, when mixed proportionally with each other. They are much more useful than cadmium colors, for example, that have a lightness built into them by way of their opacity. For example, while Cadmium Yellow can be very useful for creating lighter greens when mixed with Thalo Blue, Transparent Yellow performs much better for the creating of dark greens, when mixed with the same "Blue,".....and, without the addition of Black. There is no black paint represented in this painting.

So.....those are my 3 colors, and the reason I chose to use them was because of my unrelentless quest for reality. LOL:D Ain't painting fun? I love it!

halthepainter
12-20-2009, 01:30 PM
Wonderful painting WF. Since the basic computer printers use magenta, yellow and cyan it shouldn't be too much of hardship to complete great paintings with those colors as you have done here.

It is interesting that you have observed that the transparent colors make better darks. I wasn't aware of that. That is very interesting.

Thank you for contributing to this thread.

sidbledsoe
12-20-2009, 02:58 PM
Nice paintings Hal and Bill. Transparent primary colors will give you almost a black whereas with the same opaque primary colors you will get a dark brown.
Here are two quite good artists who mainly use three colors, Winton cad red deep, Winton ultramarine blue, and a cad yellow light. The reason they choose the Wintons is because of the transparent aspect. An artist grade cad red is opaque and an artist grade ultrablue is highly pigmented. Student grades add extenders to them and that increases the transparency. Also the cad red hue is a napthol and not opaque like real cadmium. Yellow is different, if they extend a yellow they generally add white and this decreases the transparency, hence the selection of an artist grade Cad Yellow. Bottom line, The transparency aspect increases the range of colors they can mix.
Some ban brands like Winton from their studio because the have lower pigment load and use fillers and such, here we have some professional artists who choose them because of that.
http://loriputnampaints.blogspot.com/2009/09/color-notes-my-basic-palette.html
http://www.loriputnam.com/
http://www.dawnwhitelaw.com/
As I look over the work I think it is excellent but I do see a lack of some greenish blue skies and such that you can only get from cerulean or pthalos. I have these colors and did test mixing and will do some paintings when I get time to, and would like as few as possible for plein air so this may work good for that too.
I started with watercolors many years ago and used only red, yellow, and blue for many paintings and I think it was a good way to start.

Doug Nykoe
12-20-2009, 03:22 PM
Donít forget there are such things as natural pigments meaning they appear natural to the eye. Where as a three colour pallet of the three primaries donít really work. The mistake for those who are interested or who might be on the cusp of this type of awareness is that we confuse light with pigments. Light has three primaries basically and we think we can get away with this but if a natural appearance is what you might be after this 3 primary pallet is lost in vividness and very hard to control for those who want a more natural connection to our world.

Patrick1
12-20-2009, 03:33 PM
Thanks for sharing Bill...I remember that painting of yours from a few years ago.

It is really the using of 3 colors that are NOT primary colors to create a realistic-appearing result that is more of a true challenge.
The opposite can be true at least as often; a CMY triad (a Phthalo blue or cyan and a Quinacridone rose or magenta) might mix un-necessarily chromatic purples, magntas, and greens, requiring a lot of graying down, while reds and oranges possibly not chromatic enough. I find a traditional red-yellow-blue palette easier to control and use, and usually more suited to mixing the natural range of colors in the world; it's limitations are its strength. If using 'real' primary colors is so much easier, why are there so few (any?) people/portrait painters using a CMY triad?

WFMartin
12-20-2009, 03:46 PM
Painting with only the three primaries routinely is most certainly not a very easy or practical way to paint, because it requires much unnecessary mixing. I would not recommend it as a standard practice, nor would I do it. But neither does one need to settle for overly brilliant, garish, or unreal colors, when working with just the primary colors.

My point is that painting exclusively with the 3 primaries does not necessarily have lead to a garish, or unreal-appearing result. It is true that it can, if one is not careful to control it. The "controling of it" is, as the previous poster mentioned, definitely required, but all that takes is a bit of addition of the complement to gray it (dirty it, dull it, etc., etc.)

Just because something such as using only 3 primary colors is effective doesn't mean that it is also efficient, and it surely is not. But, that is why we have so many other colors from which to choose.

The topic of this thread was "What do you do with three colors & white," and this is surely one thing that can be done with three colors and white, when one chooses the primary colors as those "3 colors". Just because I did this on a challenge does not mean that I'm recommending it as a standard practice, because that would be ridiculous. I have never done it since....it's too slow. But, in doing so, I did learn a lot regarding the usefulness of transparent colors, and that, alone, has proven to be a great advantage to my work.

To be quite honest, it was the tremendous usefulness of the transparent colors in mixing dark values that I actually learned from this little exercise. I already knew that the primary colors would behave the way they were supposed to, before I began. Sort of a serendipitious thing, I suppose.:D :D
Strange how we learn very useful things, when we're not even trying to.

sidbledsoe
12-20-2009, 06:18 PM
Hal,
Here is one I just did which is what I consider a quick study. Sometimes I go on a tear and do these quickies as I think it improves several things like brush handling, painterly style, and other things, but that is a different story. Here I am just using three earths, yellow ochre, venetian red, and ivory black. Not going for exact color matching here. This took no more than about an hour or so. There is something fun and also very relaxing about using only three colors and three earths at that to boot!
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/20-Dec-2009/112587-IMG_0019.JPG
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/20-Dec-2009/112587-IMG_0020.JPG

halthepainter
12-20-2009, 07:41 PM
Beautiful job Sid. For all intent and purpose that is the Zorn palette.

Great job.

Here is another try with the Zorn palette that I completed yesterday.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/20-Dec-2009/140488-loresf_temple_monks.jpg

Sid, if you should be interested the link below will put you into the Oil pastel's travel thread. It's our version of the Reference Library. If you scroll up and down through the thread there are a few photos from my life in the Air Force. Photos: formation in T33, refueling, islands, R&R in Bancock with many temple photos and some of a water market. Even some from back when I was a midshipman, and the USS Boston, and the Battleship Wisconsion and the Panama Canal.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=555788&page=2

WFMartin
12-20-2009, 08:53 PM
Good paintings, Sid & Hal !

There surely is something relaxing and pleasant about using a palette of 3 colors that are not primaries. For my landscapes, I have cut my palette of colors way, way down from that which I had used before. For one thing, there is less confusion when it comes to creating a color that I had mixed a day or so before. When there is a limited number of colors on my palette, the guessing regarding which ones I used to achieve a particular hue is a lot less than with a greater palette.

A palette of only 3, rather earthy colors is usually quite sufficient for painting most skin colors, as well. It creates a situation in which I am automatically forced to mentally assess the approximate contribution of Cyan, Magenta, and Yellow that each of those earth colors contribute to the mix, and in much more controllable amounts than if I were to use the primary colors in their pure, tubed forms. There is a big difference between using the pure, primary colors on my palette (which I almost never do) and applying the understanding of how those primaries behave when being contributed by the more subtle, tubed colors on my palette (which I always do). The former requires much more physical effort; the latter, just a bit more knowledge, but a lot less work.

There is a lot to be said for using a limited palette of earth colors, whether you are trying to emlulate reality, or not. Those of us who prepare careful monotone underpaintings of grisaille, or verdaccio are well aware of the fact that value is probably more important than actual hues, when it comes to the depiction of realistic paintings.

sidbledsoe
12-20-2009, 10:27 PM
Thanks alot for the link and info and for your service too Hal. You know what I was talking about Bill. When you only have a few colors to contend with, mixing is streamlined and rapid, that's why I am looking at the other palette I mentioned for plein air. I see my photo looks just a little washed out, irl it is slightly more contrasty. The red is Georgian venetian red, add a little W/N ivory black and it looks like an even deeper red.
The yellow ochre is W/N py42, mixes with the ivory to a fairly strong green, never a gaudy John Deere green though. With these three plus your three highly chromatic hues you can really cover a lot of ground.

LarrySeiler
12-21-2009, 09:49 AM
For those of us who consider black not to be a color, this painting would be an exercise in two colors plus black and white. However black when mixed with white will normally tint toward red or blue. In this case my black tints as a blue.



I don't personally see nor teach black as a color, but rather as a shade, and white I see as a tint. That's just my operandi...

When I paint outdoors, I am aware of so much indirect and reflected light happening in the shadows (the traditional place so many landscape painters referring to photos to paint from use a lot of black)...and so, I don't bother with black outdoors painting on location. I mix my own darks so effectively, that it would be very difficult for most to believe I'm not using black. But, doing so teaches me to more naturally lean the dark toward a cool or warm, or a color complementary to an area of light it is adjacent to.

here a couple small studies (5"x 7"ish) where I made my own darks, using no black...
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/21-Dec-2009/532-filmwc.0.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/21-Dec-2009/532-dogtags2.jpg

I consider learning to make a dark from your pigments a valuable tool and aide, just as making color from fewer pigments.

Now, having said that...I play with the Zorn palette...and it is fun. I enjoy it. I was told by someone here in this forum that the black of Zorn's day had more blue in it than black has today, so I add about 1/3rd ultramarine blue to my black by volume.

here are a couple Zorn influenced studies I did...

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/21-Dec-2009/532-profile_potawatomi_120.jpg

this old tractor in snow...and the sense of blue coming thru from the black/blue combination I made up..

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/21-Dec-2009/532-snowskidder_done.jpg

Sometimes these discussions lead one to seem to take a position that something is not good art if one method is used, or another. Its more an aesthetic preference, or what connects the artist to the subject. Almost perhaps as if the subject dictates...

In that sense...when I paint directly from life outdoors...the subject seen directly seems to dictate not to bother putting the black on the palette.

If on the other hand I were to set up outdoors with a Zorn palette...it is as if turning off the voice of the subject's power to mandate, and determine you are going to have fun making an interpretation, an aesthetic statement rather than literal.

Its all good...

halthepainter
12-21-2009, 10:21 AM
Hi Larry, wonderful paintings. I had seen your dogtag painting before. I think I still have mine somewhere.

I love your tractor in snow using the Zorn palette.

My play with limited palettes is for the fun of it. The Zorn palette is a fun challenge to see if I can pull it off. To me at least, limited palettes also promote color harmony within a painting. No garish colors coming in from left field as might happen in a painting by one of my expressionist friends.

One of my expressionists friends, when we paint together, is always after me to put in some unique color around my center of interest just to catch the eye. I'm just to conservative for that.

monticore
12-28-2009, 03:59 PM
I've been working on this 8x10 inperm red,ultramarine and cad yellow pale and white.It's not finished yet.It's a stream in my front yard.http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/28-Dec-2009/69618-artwork_024.JPG

halthepainter
12-28-2009, 04:08 PM
Hi Joe, you have an exciting WIP there. Please repost when you've finished it.

sidbledsoe
12-28-2009, 08:06 PM
coming along nicely monticore, I can't seem to shake this yellow ochre, venetian red, ivory black binge that I have been on, here is one very much in progress also, some pottery:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/28-Dec-2009/112587-IMG_0043.JPG

llawrence
12-28-2009, 08:14 PM
Very nice Sid - yellow ochre is one color I'd be extemely irritated to have to do without.

halthepainter
12-28-2009, 08:41 PM
Looking good Sid, maybe Adders Zorn knew what he was doing.

sidbledsoe
12-28-2009, 09:33 PM
Hey Hal and LL, yes, Yellow ochre has always been my most used color.
Remember this road Hal, I started it and couldn't decide if I want that car in there or not, what do you think? will get back to it one of these days:lol:
8x10
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/28-Dec-2009/112587-IMG_0045.JPG

monticore
12-28-2009, 10:42 PM
Thanks Hal and Sid, Hey Sid that venetian red is working well with the pottery.Your painting brings to mind those beautiful frescos that look so timeless.I've decided to stick with a limited palette I think theres just too many possibilities to make me move on at this point.The inherent harmony is a big plus.I think a limited palette is also helping me to understand color in a more useful way pushing and pulling cools and warms and learning how to manipulate and control paint in general.The subtle shifts really amaze me.My goal is to be able to get the value hue and chroma that works really well in a passage quickly and intuitively, that skill will take me a very long time.Joe.

sidbledsoe
03-12-2011, 09:52 PM
I got some Lukas Berlin Water mixable paints to try out, cad red hue (napthol), cad yellow lt hue (arylide), and ultramarine blue. I can mix nice darks with those student grade paints, they aren't all loaded up with pigment and so opaque.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/12-Mar-2011/112587-IMGP2445.JPG
this doesn't have a wide range of colors but I did some practice mixes and I could really mix enough colors to do a whole lot of work with. I had read here (http://loriputnampaints.blogspot.com/2009/09/color-notes-my-basic-palette.html)about the vesatility of doing a red, yellow, blue palette with student grade, low pigment load and after working with these I must say that there is something to it. I could mix nice secondaries like violet which would be a bit duller with cads for instance.

halthepainter
03-12-2011, 10:49 PM
Hi Larry, beautiful piece of work. Glad you rememdered this thread.

halthepainter
03-13-2011, 11:40 AM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Mar-2011/140488-Winter_Scene_Artist_Daily_touched_up_wc.jpg
OK, I'm kind'a cheating on this one since it was almost monochromatic except for the red. The other colors were black, blue and white.

I usually only paint with the three primaries, with some black on the side and only use that very rarely, such as in this type painting.

Gouache is becoming my favorite medium. I've been able to purchase introductory sets of Turner gouache (six 20 ml,tubes: black, white, permanent red, yellow, cobalt blue, and permanent green) for about a dollar a tube. With my preference for limited palettes, that's all I'll ever need as a landscape painter.

My Hero, John Stobart, has used only five colors through out his long, eminently successful career. From art school to the present he paints only with titanium white, windsor red, cad yellow, French ultramarine blue, burnt sienna, and permanent green.

halthepainter
03-13-2011, 12:30 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Mar-2011/140488-mount_redoubt_natural_light.jpg

My Mount Redoubt, 8 by 10 inches, Turner acryla gouache, on "Yes" water media canvas.
Palette: Permanent Red, Permanent Yellow deep, and Cobalt Blue. (titanium white)
My first effort on the watercolor canvas and I really liked it.

sidbledsoe
03-13-2011, 02:01 PM
Good examples Hal!:thumbsup:
My motivation right now is developing my skills at this to be geared totally toward plein air painting. Simplification is the goal, these soft creamy paints lend themselves so well to quick sketching with the extra bonus feature of cleanup with water. Yes, that palette Stobart uses can cover a huge gamut of color.

stapeliad
03-13-2011, 10:50 PM
Sid your heron is beautiful.

sidbledsoe
03-20-2011, 09:19 AM
Thanks Jessica,
I am on a three color binge here lately, this one is a with what I call my minor palette (earths) 6x6, Holbein oils using, ultramarine blue, yellow ochre, and burnt sienna, white.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/20-Mar-2011/112587-IMGP2470.JPG

stapeliad
03-20-2011, 09:39 AM
Sid I love your puppy!
You got some great greys with this palette.

LarrySeiler
03-20-2011, 09:46 AM
very nice Sid...

My blog was birthed back in 2006...as I first experimented with the limited palette...limited use of color. The first couple years committing myself to one daily postcard sized (or thereabouts) one hour study, with no intent such should interfere with my otherwise regular painting. A place to push palette strategies and exhaust what is possible with just three colors plus white.

On some experiments I used naples yellow, or viridian...but then let that be known.

Initially...I thought the blog would change its course and direction perhaps a couple months later. I was at the time convinced there could be no complexity or depth of discovery by such limitation. I was seriously wrong. Five years later that blog continues to grow...though it goes in a number of directions of pushes and experiments.

Emile Gruppe is one I like to read of my books regularly, and I'm preparing a future webinar on color for the painter, so it is informing to read his thoughts. He painted with more than three colors, so let's get that out of the way first of all so no one feels the need to chastise me on that...but, he talks about the complete capabilities of three colors.

And when I read Payne's book...the various strategies still converge on the concept of the basic three primaries. When he paints with a complementary palette...say two pigments blue and orange (plus white)...the orange is a component made of yellow + red...so, in essence all three primaries are yet present.

When painting a split-complementary palette...say yellow-orange plus violet and blue the three primaries are there. One sets it up...and paints "pretending" if you will...that your violet is your red, your yellow-orange your yellow, and blue...and you mix then in theory.

Its all fun...but after sometime...it becomes quite intuitive...and that translates to a state of enhanced efficiency afield for me....

LarrySeiler
03-20-2011, 10:01 AM
back in the day...I used to wrestle with can one get a dark enough dark without black...? And my co-mod in Plein Air, Jamie...turned me on to Utrecht's French Ultramarine Blue...and these represent a small composite of those earlier pushes. I found by using thicker paint and purer, the darks were more than possible, and the result was often richer...


http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/20-Mar-2011/532-smallstudies_comp.jpg

halthepainter
03-20-2011, 10:18 AM
Sid, wonderful Puppy.

Larry thanks for your experience with the limited palette and the super examples of your work.

couturej
03-20-2011, 10:46 AM
This one was completed with a limited palette: Cadmium Red Hue, Imidazolone Yellow Light and Cerulean Blue

My daughter Lindsay
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/20-Mar-2011/84697-4612133207_506095a7ed_z.jpg

LarrySeiler
03-20-2011, 10:56 AM
Not sure...might be a contrast enhancement thing...or how my monitor is reading, but I think if you pushed values a bit more...key it up, use the white and darks to create more contrast accents, it would push the mileage possible from this palette...

lovely though all the same...

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/20-Mar-2011/532-janet_daughter.jpg

halthepainter
03-20-2011, 11:02 AM
Lovely work Janet.

CharM
03-20-2011, 12:01 PM
What beautiful work! I enjoy working with triads every now and again... reading of your experiences with limited palettes is informative and interesting. Janet, it's amazing how you achieved such beautiful skin tones with your three colours!

This is one of my favourite three colour paintings... light washes of ultramarine blue or alizarin created the form of my zebra in his underpainting. Then, the zebra's stripes were glazed with juicy alizarin crimson. Then when that dried, juicy ultramarine blue over the red. And when that dried, a little burnt umber in the shadow areas to ensure a rich black.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/20-Mar-2011/20514-SuntannedZebra1.jpg

halthepainter
03-20-2011, 12:49 PM
Beautiful Char.

sidbledsoe
03-20-2011, 03:46 PM
I am so pleased to see the response and wonderful examples by all, Larry yours have your cool, great looking, masterful style, Janet that is a beautiful pose and painting of your daughter, (our own kids are the most special thing one can paint) and that is a gorgeous zebra Char, I will make sure Carey Griffel sees it for she is a zebraholic if ever there was one.
Larry is right, it does make things go smooth and economically, here is a shot of my two brushes, painting, and the palette showing how little mixing patches were used. This is after the completed painting with no cleaning off of the palette at all.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/20-Mar-2011/112587-IMGP2472.JPG

Gigalot
03-20-2011, 03:53 PM
Superb!

couturej
03-21-2011, 07:59 AM
Larry, nothing wrong with your monitor but my photographing skills are lacking. Your edit of the photo gives a better representation of the real painting. Thank you!

Thank you Hal and Sid!

Beautiful Zebra Char!

I agree it does make things easier to work with 3 colors. It's easy to remember what colors you used if you need to mix more. But it can be very challenging as well. A good understanding of complementary colors and color theory in general is essential.

couturej
03-21-2011, 08:37 AM
This is what I did to help me understand color:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/sets/72157626315824608/

It's a set of charts that are based on HSB color space but the value and chroma is based on Munsell. Just thought I'd share thinking it might help someone else understand color. Please note that the color wheel is based on RYB but CMY may be the better option for complementary colors. I have produced some for CMY in excel which I don't think I have a way of sharing.

Richard Saylor
03-25-2011, 01:54 PM
The use of only three primaries does not necessarily impose any limits on hue, but it can certainly affect chroma. Personally, I think of CMY and go from there.

halthepainter
03-25-2011, 02:21 PM
CoutureJ, I just looked at your color wheel. Now I have a headache. :evil: :lol:

couturej
03-25-2011, 10:19 PM
I know what you mean hal It gave me a headache doing it. lol

To think... I'm actually still working on a CMYK version. I'm so into the color theory portion of painting I wonder when I'll actually start a painting. I wasn't satisfied with these results as they looked off that I continued to research. Now hands on mixing as well as more digital charts to try and pinpoint the elusive properties of color. Mostly trying to get the complementary colors down for mixing.

Sometimes I think my mind is way too scientific to be a true artist.

Evelien1
03-28-2011, 09:51 AM
Great thread, I practice this challange a lot. Still I often need just a little bit of 1 extra shade.

These are from a bigger series ('snapshots'). small panels (15 x 20 cm). Underpainting is done in 1 earth tint and white, and a lot of it shines through.
the first one is burnt siena and white, indigo and quinacridone rose over it.


http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/28-Mar-2011/225917-sch-landschapstudie-6-9-sta.jpg

The one below is a cheat (it has 5 shades)
caput mortuum and white, over that indigo, quinacridone rose (just a hinge), burnt umber (bushes below)

halthepainter
03-28-2011, 10:16 AM
Evelien glad to have you joining in. I'm glad you enjoy this thread. I felt it had merit for us to see what other artists do with three colors and white. Your pieces are lovely.

My winter scene is almost cheating since it doesn't require much color. 11 by 14 inch gouache on watercolor canvas. Primary red, primary yellow deep, cobalt blue and titanium white.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/28-Mar-2011/140488-Winter_Scene_Gouache.jpg

couturej
03-28-2011, 10:20 AM
Evelien, beautiful paintings!

Hal, I love it! The whole painting is wonderful but especially noticed how well your pine trees are done. Do you use a fan brush? I blow a landscapes so always on the lookout for tips. :)

halthepainter
03-28-2011, 10:39 AM
Thank you Couturej.

No I don't use a fan brush. All my paintings are done with flat brushes unless I just have to use a round. The pines were done with either a 3/8 or 1/2 inch flat. I just dab the tip around in an arching shape.

sidbledsoe
03-28-2011, 12:39 PM
Hal, those are nice rich browns you mixed and good value range from very low to high.

Richard Saylor
03-29-2011, 03:24 AM
Hal, those are nice rich browns you mixed and good value range from very low to high.
By contrast, the warm browns set off the coldness of the snow and the blue shadows. Very effective painting. I would like it hanging on my wall, but I wouldn't want to actually be there. Brrrrrr!

halthepainter
03-29-2011, 08:46 AM
Thank you Richard and Sid.

couturej
03-29-2011, 10:08 AM
Hal, Thank you for the explanation on how you did you pine trees. You're the best. Thank you also for starting this thread I'm really enjoying it.

halthepainter
05-17-2011, 05:20 PM
Lately I've been doing all my paintings with the "Artist's Primary Palette" of red, yellow, blue, green and white.

However, I revived my Zorn palette for a demo painting last weekend. (red, yellow, black and white)

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-May-2011/140488-Misty_Moring.jpg

Admittedly, the sudject didn't demand a lot of color. :wink2:

CSForest
06-09-2011, 12:17 PM
Alizarin Crimson, Ultramarine Blue, Azo Yellow, and Zinc White.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Jun-2011/94004-dogs_fith.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Jun-2011/94004-fith_closeup.jpg

halthepainter
06-09-2011, 12:47 PM
Crista, your work is absoultely fantastic. Thanik you for contributing.

Your palette worked perfectly.

Evelien1
06-16-2011, 02:56 PM
Wow csforest, you must be doing a lot of mixing before you start! Love your colors, amazing how natural your work looks.

Halthepainter, great zen quality. All the unnecessary left out. Very effective brushing. There seems to be blue in the water, is that just optical? (I love it when that happens)

chalet_dor
06-16-2011, 07:34 PM
Hello csforest

I am amazed. Beautiful work. dor ;)