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Wayne Gaudon
08-20-2002, 08:17 AM
I seem to recall reading somewhere that one shouldn't varnish thick paint as it only creates problems with the varnish building in the ridges, and being hard to remove. Can't remember the source.

Has anyone heard of this or any such thing .. I paint heavy and would like to varnish my stuff after a 6 month wait?

Einion
08-20-2002, 08:16 PM
Wayne, first off if you paint pretty thickly I would advise waiting longer than six months to varnish (rough idea how thick the paint layer gets?) Very thick layers can take years, literally, to fully oxidise.

Heavy impasto is problematical to varnish because, applied by brush, it tends to pool in the low spots by moving away from the high spots, so you can end up with a thick layer in the valleys of a brushstroke and very little on the ridges. Many conservators think you shouldn't really varnish very heavily textured work for a number of reasons (in which case it should be protected behind glass if at all possible) but if you do it might be best applied with a spraygun I'm afraid.

Einion

Wayne Gaudon
08-20-2002, 08:36 PM
Einion
.. thank you
.. I wouldn't say it's over 1/8 and more than likely not that thick .. but compared to layers, that is thick. I have an air brush but again someone once said don't use spray but I can see from your explanation that spray would be far more effective than a liberal dose with a brush. Can you apply more than one coat of varnish with an airbrush or does that not work for some reason.

I've only ever varnished wood and I know that 6 or seven very thin coats certainly can make a piece look good.

Leopoldo1
08-20-2002, 09:18 PM
Originally posted by Wayne Gaudon
I seem to recall reading somewhere that one shouldn't varnish thick paint as it only creates problems with the varnish building in the ridges, and being hard to remove. Can't remember the source.

Has anyone heard of this or any such thing .. I paint heavy and would like to varnish my stuff after a 6 month wait?

Wayne,

Varnishing properly takes some practice but is not overwhelming to master even on impasto pieces. Heat the varnish, use a very good varnish brush, load lightly and above all move quickly and cover everything in a small perimeter before moving on. It is important to angle your body for the best visual perspective to see areas you have missed, sunken areas, so you can attain to them quickly, for going back on semi-dry or dry areas afterwards, can create overlapping heavy varnish, that will look uneven and make you wish you could start all over again. Practice on something less than your masterpieces! I have varnished on pieces with only a couple of weeks of drying with no ill effects, no cracking, and they still look good after more than a decade! Go figure on the six month rule.......L

PS: Wayne why do you want to remove it (the varnish)? and please don't tell me it is because it is going to hang in some museum centuries from now and some curator will want to restore it. If that is the case let them worry about it.. Paint your masterpeice, but above all, experiment!.......

Wayne Gaudon
08-21-2002, 05:06 AM
Leopoldo .. I couldn't care less about removing the varnish .. just quoting what I read and wondering if anyone had read the same thing and could expound on the matter .. I wouldn't for a moment consider that anything of mine would ever make it to a museum .. I haven't come close to a piece that I like let alone making a masterpiece .. too funny.
I just like to do things as best I can when I do them and that would include applying varnish to my little pieces of time. Mind you, a great lot of what is called masterpieces and are hanging in the museums is nothing more than junk anyway so that issue is only a joke to begin with. At the rate we are going, it will be lucky if we as a people are still here in 100 years.

Thanks,
Later,

Is there a particular brand of brush that is the brush for applying varnish and as for the beeswax .. can you use any pure beeswax or shoud it be white?

Leopoldo1
08-21-2002, 10:22 AM
Originally posted by Wayne Gaudon
Is there a particular brand of brush that is the brush for applying varnish and as for the beeswax .. can you use any pure beeswax or shoud it be white?



Oh Wayne, everything i say I hope is taken lightly, i know sometimes i don't come across like that, art above all is supposed to be fun. I have heard so many times how some artists are so concerned about how their painting years from now is going to be restored, and where the varnish will have to be removed.

I typically varnish everything because all drying pigments are not equal and sunken areas are always visible. Varnish helps to enrich the look of the painting so everything has the same sheen. if i had that sheen using some magic medium then i wouldn't varnish! the only time i had to remove damar was when a two inch rip accidently was made into a painting. In order to repair the rip and paint back into it, the varnish needed to be removed.

The spanish company Escoda makes a good flat narrow brush, light ox hair. Any art store should carry a good brush for varnishing. Wax pastilles are small filtered pieces of beewax and are manufactured specifically for artist. Send me your address for that mastic!.......L

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/21-Aug-2002/escoda2.jpg

Wayne Gaudon
08-21-2002, 10:39 AM
I'm a lighthearted soul .. never a problem with such remarks ..

have sent you the self-addressed bla bla for the mastic... you should get it next week .. knew you were away and then I had it sitting in my truck for a week before I made it over to the post office and got it out in Monday's mail.

Thanks tons for the info and all and don't forget to include you receipe for making the maroger as well .. for future use when I get a house with a back yard. Going to get my French easel today so I will see what they have in the line of beeswax, brush, and damar crystals.

Later,

Wayne Gaudon
08-21-2002, 12:07 PM
Leopoldo
.. the local art store have what they list as Pure BeesWax and say they have not heard of Wax Pastilles .. their description of it's uses is for adding to varnish .. same stuff or inferior? This is Pure BeesWax (http://www.currys.com/mediums/prodinfo2.asp?SubcatID=4053&catID=1)

Leopoldo1
08-21-2002, 01:05 PM
Originally posted by Wayne Gaudon
Leopoldo
.. the local art store have what they list as Pure BeesWax and say they have not heard of Wax Pastilles .. their description of it's uses is for adding to varnish .. same stuff or inferior? This is Pure BeesWax (http://www.currys.com/mediums/prodinfo2.asp?SubcatID=4053&catID=1)

Any artist grade beeswax should be sufficient. I purchase mine here in Portland from Gamblin. Wax pastilles are naturally white, unbleached beeswax. Besides being used in a matte varnish, they can be a binder for encaustic painting or to make wax medium.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/21-Aug-2002/wax.jpg

Wayne Gaudon
08-21-2002, 03:40 PM
Ok .. got it all or on order .. Turpentine .. probably a dumb question but is there any speciality about Turpentine .. Is Turpentine turpentine or is there some special one at the art store?

walden
08-21-2002, 08:23 PM
I have a gazillion varnishing questions: do you folks thin the varnish with turpentine, and if so, don't you worry about it messing up the paint coat? What ratio do you use? And, if I want a gloss varnish, do I need beeswax at all? And, I suppose the reference to heating up means you're using damar crystals instead of a ready-prepared liquid?

I tried W&N liquid damar varnish once un-thinned, and it was a nightmare-- impossible to put down a thin coat.

Also, I've been using "Kamar Varnish" spray by Krylon, just a light coat-- it says it's ok to use on oils, but I think it's probably an acrylic formulation-- can't tell, though-- no proper ingredients list, but it says that overspray can be removed with turpentine, mineral spirits or naptha. Maybe it's not acrylic?

Any help would be GREATLY appreciated. :D

walden
08-21-2002, 08:25 PM
Oh, I should mention that while it would be nice if the finish would last forever, be removable by conservators, etc., etc., realistically, it probably only needs to last until my "collector" re-decorates the living room. :D

Wayne Gaudon
08-21-2002, 08:39 PM
Lisa .. you should find some of your questions answered Here (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=55502)

walden
08-21-2002, 09:09 PM
Thanks, Wayne-- that does help.