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Zirngibism
04-15-2009, 05:48 PM
Hi,

I'm looking at some of the Atelier interactive single colors, and noticed that there was another kind of white: "tinting white".

(Found here; scroll down towards the bottom): http://www.dickblick.com/products/chroma-atelier-interactive-professional-artists-acrylics/

Is tinting white simply less opaque so that it's able to lighten colors without making them chalky? (Somehow, it's kind of hard to imagine!)

See, I like working with thin layers and getting a watercolor-ish look, so I was thinking this might be of use.
Just wondering if it's worth buying...


(Same question goes for the "toning" colors (toning gray mid, toning gray pinkish, and toning gray yellowish). Are these worth the extra money?)

idylbrush
04-15-2009, 07:41 PM
Look here: http://www.dickblick.com/items/01616-1128/#colorpigments

Seems it is nothing more than Titanium White. Have you considered Zinc White (sometimes called transparent white).

timelady
04-16-2009, 05:14 AM
mmmm zinc white. :D Zinc white is very transparent. I've heard of some brands having a mixing or tinting white that's a mixture of titanium and zinc. The only reason I could think this could be 'tinting' is if maybe there's less pigment to binder than usual? That would be a psychological trick really - giving the illusion of the same amount of paint for tinting rather than overwhelming a mixture.

Tina.

Einion
04-16-2009, 07:16 AM
I'm looking at some of the Atelier interactive single colors, and noticed that there was another kind of white: "tinting white".
I don't know the Interactive version but generally paints of this name are weaker (lower tinting strength) whites geared to being less strong than Titanium White.

Being a cynic I think they're a waste of money - not like white overpowers things as a rule! - but to be fair they usually also give slightly different tints. For example if you mix a given red to the same value with Titanium White and Mixing White/Tinting White the latter will often be higher in chroma.

See, I like working with thin layers and getting a watercolor-ish look, so I was thinking this might be of use.
Well technically a watercolour-ish way would generally involve no white :) But if you have a look at the Chroma site (http://www.chromaonline.com/chroma/products/atelier_interactive) it might have information that'll allow you to decide better.

(Same question goes for the "toning" colors (toning gray mid, toning gray pinkish, and toning gray yellowish). Are these worth the extra money?)That's up to you. Some people like having certain convenience colours on hand, other people prefer to mix from scratch.

If they're cheap enough I'd certainly say try one, see if you like it and find a use for it; if so then maybe try the others two as well.


Look here: http://www.dickblick.com/items/01616-1128/#colorpigments

Seems it is nothing more than Titanium White.
Unfortunately I don't think we can trust the listed pigments for a few of these paints - the Toning Gray Pinkish for example is stated as a mix of white and Lamp Black... and that can't be right given it's, well, pinkish!

Einion

Zirngibism
04-16-2009, 03:46 PM
Thanks for the replies, everyone!

idylbrush: Dontcha wish they used tinted paper when showing white stroke samples? I had a hard time seeing anything... :-\ Anyway, I've heard of zinc white before, but unfortunately, it looks like Chroma doesn't offer it.

timelady: Thanks for the info about zinc vs. titanium. So tinting white could be either filler-fed titanium, or zinc. Looks like I can just ask 'em though. Does seem a bit tricky though, like you said, which is why I made this thread!

Einion: Makes sense. As for my preferred way of working, I like the idea of using opaque washes to build up value, almost like the layered approach to master painting in oils, only water-based.

Check out some of the work of Eric Fortune, an illustrator I admire: http://www.ericfortune.com/personal
He works all in acrylics, with both transparent and opaque washes.

Anyway, I've decided to try to just work from the basic kit for awhile and then add new tubes if I really see a gap in my tools. Thanks for the insights!

*dee*
04-16-2009, 08:31 PM
I use Titanium white when I want to paint white.

And I use Zinc white to mix. It does not result in such chalky colors as "Tit.white + color".

unfortunately, it looks like Chroma doesn't offer it.
What's stopping you from getting a tube of Zinc white in a different brand?

My Zinc white is a different brand from most of my other tubes of paint.

Zirngibism
04-17-2009, 02:07 AM
Hmmm... well, I was told by a teacher last year not to mix acrylic brands. Supposedly some of them differ a lot, chemically, and might actually want to separate, or dry at different times, crinkle, or something.

While I've seen people do it before, I don't really want to risk anything. :-\

Also, some of the "interactive" mediums sold have asterisks next to them, saying that they are only to be used with chroma atelier interactive paints. So maybe if the two paints were compatible, the mediums would not be?

(It's something I might try out when the paints arrive in the mail.)

Einion
04-17-2009, 08:04 AM
Hmmm... well, I was told by a teacher last year not to mix acrylic brands. Supposedly some of them differ a lot, chemically, and might actually want to separate, or dry at different times, crinkle, or something.
There's more on this in older threads but basically it's nothing to worry about. This is old advice, apparently from when you did have to be wary of this - like 40+ years ago!

With the new paints like Golden Open and Atelier Interactive being so different from normal acrylics, with mixtures of the two types one might have to be more careful (at the very least it'll make a mix more normal or more interactive, depending on which paint type dominates).

But as far as acrylics generally go it's practically unheard of for there to be problems; a great many of the members here use more than one brand.

Einion

jennifervs
04-17-2009, 10:45 AM
Good question! It can be difficult to tell on a color chart - especially viewed online - but the Tinting White is warmer than Titanium White. It is also not as opaque, even though it is labeled opaque. It has mica in it, so you can create some really interesting transparent tints with it. Based on your portfolio, you may like to explore this white if you find your tints look too cool or chalky.

The toning greys - Toning Grey Yellow, Pink and Mid - are great convenience colors and can quickly tone a color. Because these colors have white in them, you would not want to use them to tone transparent glazes. On Chroma's website there's more info on mixtures and colors - http://www.chromaonline.com/chroma/products/atelier_interactive/colour_range/colour_groups/tinting_and_toning

I think you are going about your explorations in the right way. Start with a limited palette and add more colors as needed. Limited palettes are a great way to learn about color mixtures, but adding new or unexpected colors can take your work in a new direction. I mostly mix my own greens (I'm an old-fashioned girl), but lately I've been playing with Forest Green and Green Black in my landscapes. Made some neat mixtures in the tree line on the left. I also used Tinting White instead of Titanium White in this piece.


Have fun painting!