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JavaJive
08-16-2002, 03:38 PM
Does anyone know of a good way to create realistic hair in the PSP program? I can not afford PS or obtain Painter at this time.
Any suggestions or techniques would be appreciated
Thanks

fugitive
08-16-2002, 04:17 PM
I've been researching and reading, and sweating for several yrs to get hair right in PSP7. Now I guess, I get to pass it on. I have many paintings. Don't think I did a hair specific tut, but have some knowlege of the subject.
Lately though, I do slip over to Painter for some hair texture, which can't be beat. Try this mini painting tut I did.
http://www.retouchpro.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=3578

BlackTigr
08-17-2002, 06:11 AM
Javajive, for my most complex digital work (in progress so far) to date...I first used a base color, smudged in a darker color, and then airbrushed on top. It gave me the effect I wanted, but the hair took me literally tens of hours of learning curve. If I can find Red Riding Hood, I will post a link for ya.

--BT

Edit: Link-- http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=39667

And note that 90% of this was done on PSP 4.

digistyle
08-17-2002, 12:40 PM
I don't use psp, but my suggestion would be not to look at the process as a function of any particular program. Use the basic techniques that a traditional artist would use and adapt them to the medium (program) that you are using. Here a good tute from an oil painter who also works digitally:
http://www.seegmillerart.com/Images/tutorials/hair/hair1.html

This one is by one of my favorite digi artists:
http://www.gameart.com/tutorials/index.asp?tutorial=hair2

Finally, here's one created for psp, illustrated on a poser model. IMO, its more of a "how not to" rather than "how to." In contrast to the first two, it doesn't treat the hair as a mass, instead, focusing on rendering individual strands. The light source is indistinct, likewise the shadows. I would consider this an example of focusing on the programs capabilities rather than an artistic representation of hair:
http://sweetdreamsdigital.com/HairTut1.html
(Note: This is NOT an attack on the creator of this tute; just one man's critique of the process. I applaud and appreciate the efforts of anyone who takes the time to share what they've learned.)

digistyle

BlackTigr
08-17-2002, 01:59 PM
When I get my own computer back, I will search through the `tween stages and make Red into a mini-tut. I think that my many hours of trial-and-error should count for something...besides making me wish heartily for a tablet.

--BT

fugitive
08-17-2002, 02:07 PM
tiger, I saw a Aiptec for sale last nite for $58, that looked quite similar to my Graphire2. You need one, everyone needs one, get one today, try ebay, used, Wacom sells reconditioned returns cheaper, but they go fast.

BlackTigr
08-17-2002, 02:17 PM
It's not that I can't afford one...It's that my computer has no USB ports to plug it into. That may be changing as we speak, because my computer's in the shop getting diagnosed.

You can be assured that if I get a new motherboard, I will come home with a wacom that same trip.

--BT

fugitive
08-17-2002, 02:27 PM
hey, ever been in love with a lovely woman? this is kinda like that, except you don't see it's faults in 6 months, it just keeps being good to you.

wardseward
08-17-2002, 02:34 PM
Has anyone tried the Aiptek?

I just picked up a copy of Computer Arts Special Magazine (an U.K. pub) yesterday and they did a review of graphic tablets. The EasyPenG6 (which seems to be the UK version of the Aiptek) got a higher rating than the Wacom Intuos2. I think the low price raised the score.

Anyway, the Aiptek is like the Graphire2 but will a much higher resolution. In fact, it has a higher res than the Intous2. Oh and it's much bigger than the Graphire2.

Ok...I just wanted to get some user opinions about the Aiptek.

Guy
08-17-2002, 11:26 PM
Digistyle is correct. Any of the top paint progs are capable media for painting anything! It's not a question of which brush, color, tool or filter (ugh). It's a question of understanding hair as having mass, weight and volume. Individual strands of hair should only be hinted at if painted at all! Also the Seegmiller and Bergkvist links above are excellent digital tuts. I agree the third tut is a good "how not to". Progs like Poser give digital art a bad name.

mmdm
08-18-2002, 02:33 PM
Originally posted by BlackTigr
It's not that I can't afford one...It's that my computer has no USB ports to plug it into. That may be changing as we speak, because my computer's in the shop getting diagnosed.

You can be assured that if I get a new motherboard, I will come home with a wacom that same trip.

--BT

My Wacom Intuos uses the serial port. You can get either serial port or USB port. HTH.

mmdm

JavaJive
08-18-2002, 09:31 PM
Guy, I have Poser 2, and find it a very helpful tool. Is it wrong to use digital models to draw from as reference? Frankly I see nothing wrong with it and is certainly more convenient than having a live model "pose" for you! On the other hand ,using the poser image produced like it is in a painting would still be considered by some to be art also, but thats not my style.

Guy
08-19-2002, 02:22 PM
I never thought of using Poser as a ref. It might work to some degree, it's hard to say without actually seeing the program myself. I usually use photos and it can be vary difficult to find one to suit my idea, so I typically have to alter the painting to the refs I have. I could see Poser being used with photos refs to pull off an idea.

I don't think I could ever see a painting with Poser models as art, because the "art" is that of the Poser programmers.

digistyle
08-19-2002, 02:33 PM
I tried using Poser for refs, but I never took the time to become competent with the software. I never could position the figure into the position that I was visualizing, so I went back to the old standby of working out the poses with stick figures, circles, blocks and cylinders.

If you can get the pose you want, Poser is great for trying out various light sources and points of view. Getting more proficient with it is something that I have on my "to-do" list. As a reference tool, it beats the crap out of the old wooden artists' mannequin! :D

digistyle

fugitive
08-19-2002, 03:10 PM
well, I have tS5 and I couldn't even make one thing in it.
Much more difficult than 2D programs. I dicided to concentrate on 2D art because I can't see 3D as art at all, even if it does take skill, so does programing........

ExpressMark
08-24-2002, 12:12 AM
Originally posted by Guy
I never thought of using Poser as a ref. It might work to some degree, it's hard to say without actually seeing the program myself. I usually use photos and it can be vary difficult to find one to suit my idea, so I typically have to alter the painting to the refs I have. I could see Poser being used with photos refs to pull off an idea.

I don't think I could ever see a painting with Poser models as art, because the "art" is that of the Poser programmers.

I have POser 4 and use it to look and study lighting on the body as you can set up your own lighting in it.

Also its a good reference for if you are desiging your own characters or a complex pose for a painting to play with ligts.

It has other uses too, however, the anatomy even on the best of the models is not accurate, its close, but does not replace life, but it does serve as a good program for free MODELS :)


SO you can practice on your life drawing techniques as long as one underdtands that again it doesnt replace life or imitates it.

BlackTigr
08-25-2002, 11:16 PM
Originally posted by mmdm


My Wacom Intuos uses the serial port. You can get either serial port or USB port. HTH.

mmdm

The store I looked at only carried the USB version. Do you know who sells the serial version?

--BT

Guy
08-25-2002, 11:33 PM
When I was researching the Wacom before my purchase I saw several serial models on Ebay. If I remember correctly I also saw a few sold by companies listed at pricewatch.com, through which I tracked down my USB model.