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kiwicockatoo
08-09-2002, 01:44 PM
Here's and idea I'm throwing around. I'm painting a picture of parrots. The background is mostly misty forest canopy. I don't usually use much medium in my paint, so most of my work dries quite matte.

In real life the parrots are quite irridescent. I was thinking of adding some stand oil to the parrots to make them shinier than the surroundings.

Questions: Is this acceptable practice for oils? Would varying shiny areas be looked on as a lack of skill? Is varnishing crucial to protect the surface of the painting? If I did varish it would spoil the effect, I think.

Sorry if this is a stupid question - I don't know if oil painters use medium in this way.

guillot
08-09-2002, 02:34 PM
Hi Kiwicockatoo! You know more than I do about this. I don't know whether or not it is traditionally accepted, but I think it's a cool idea. Someone else had a question last week, I think it was, about wanting the iron gates in a painting to be shiny, and of course we know that stand oil gives a nice sheen to the paint. She also wanted varying shines/gloss in her painting.

I guess maybe the determing factor of acceptance would be whether or not it is purposely done, or if it was "lack of ability or skill". I have NO CLUE :D. Cool/different idea though.

Tina

Luis Guerreiro
08-09-2002, 06:35 PM
Hi,

Stand oil alone won't do well. It wrinkles and is too fat to be used alone.
A natural glossy can be obtained with:
1 part stand oil + 1 part turps + 1 part Canada Balsam (resin)

The resin makes it jewel-like shiny which is what you seem to want.

Best

Luis :)

kiwicockatoo
08-09-2002, 08:37 PM
I'm so confused over the whole medium issue. So far this is how I've been painting:

Underpainting: no medium at all
Second layer: a teeny, tiny touch of linseed oil.

Have had no problem so far with cracking, crinkling, whatever. My paints are touch dry after a week max. The stand oil idea came from a post a while back (I can't remember who suggested this) to add a drop of stand oil to your paint to impart an "enamel like" finish. I confess I have not tried stand oil yet.

I'm guessing some of you are adding much more medium to your paints? I've also read on this board too to add as little medium as possible to your paints, as too much can cause problems. So that's what I've been doing: a thin underpainting with a thicker, slightly fatter second layer. In general I think I paint a lot thinner than most people.

I'm happy with the way my paintings look - how long do I have to wait before they start to disintegrate due to poor practice? My oldest one is only from last January!

Argh - all this talk about medium is causing me way too much stress.

Wayne Gaudon
08-10-2002, 04:31 AM
kiwicockatoo
I think your paintings will be just fine. You are following the fat over lean rule. As for the matte finish, they make matte varnish for people who don't want the sheen or the luster of a gloss finish.
People use beeswax to dull the gloss shine .. Myself, I like a satin finish over a gloss but it all depends on where you hang the painting as well. I do like a satin or gloss as it seems to make the colors more lively.
I for one would not want to have a painting with two different finishes .. to me that looks amateur. You can make things shine by using your colors .. ie .. mute grey down the forest (all the forest colors tinted down to greys made from compliments) and use full color on the birds .. they will jump out at you.

kiwicockatoo
08-11-2002, 02:04 PM
Originally posted by Wayne Gaudon

I for one would not want to have a painting with two different finishes .. to me that looks amateur. You can make things shine by using your colors .. ie .. mute grey down the forest (all the forest colors tinted down to greys made from compliments) and use full color on the birds .. they will jump out at you.

Methinks you are right - it was a bad idea!

Blueskies
08-19-2002, 11:30 AM
Okay, I've been reading this thread with interest, as I just finished my first oil.

does the finish varnish even out the areas of the painting? I know this is proabably a dumb question, but forgive me, I'm new to this! My painting has some shiny areas, not all over, usually in the high points of some heavy impasto work. Is this bad??? Will the final varnish in six months or so even this out???

Leopoldo1
08-19-2002, 11:41 PM
Viewing a painting with different areas of gloss versus areas of dullness is unpleasant to the eye. As a rule, we paint with the idea of keeping the total subject matter unified. If the eye is scattered trying to create this total unification, it is causing tension. We want harmony, and that means visual simplicity, we should keep it as we view the natural world............L

TeAnne
08-20-2002, 04:19 AM
I was always told to never varnish a painting under a year old.
I also use Medium 1 with my linseed and paints.