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Scarefishcrow
12-01-2008, 12:47 AM
Hello and welcome to the December Oil Pastel Challenge. Contrary to what you may think Scarefishcrow is NOT HOSTING this month's challenge.

Was that a collective sigh of relief I heard????

No, your host is the ever so talented and diverse Truck Driver (RG). He is out of town and unable to start the challenge thread so he asked me to please post his two reference images for him and invite all of you to give them a try with your OP's. RG will be returning, I hope, and probably have more to say about the images.

So with no further delay, here, fellow OP'ers, are your two challenge images for DECEMBER 2008 courtesy of Truck Driver (RG):



http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Nov-2008/108067-136518-parkchallenge.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Nov-2008/108067-136518-smallfrog.jpg


BILL:wave:

Pat Isaac
12-01-2008, 08:13 AM
Thanks, Bill. I put a stickie on it.

Pat

Scarefishcrow
12-01-2008, 05:28 PM
Thanks, Pat
Looks like RG threw us a couple of pretty challenging refrence images. Should be challenging and fun.

Bill:thumbsup:

robertsloan2
12-03-2008, 09:13 AM
These are so great! RG has a good eye for beautiful images. I love the forest, that's one I might do as a serious painting if I can make the time for it this month. Very frustrating I didn't manage to find time for last month's Challenge. I loved both of your references, Bill.

Scarefishcrow
12-03-2008, 09:25 AM
These are so great! RG has a good eye for beautiful images. I love the forest, that's one I might do as a serious painting if I can make the time for it this month. Very frustrating I didn't manage to find time for last month's Challenge. I loved both of your references, Bill.

Don't feel bad, I'm still working on it. No time limits.

Bill

truck driver
12-05-2008, 01:15 AM
Bill, what kinda little frog is that?


As to the images, I wasnt trying to be tricky, or throw a curveball, I have been playing with light in images and havent been so succesfull with it so i kind of cheated and threw that image in to see how others deal with it. The picture was taken on one of the many portland area nature trails, this is one in Beaverton, Or. I spent a wonderfull day walking in the woods with my wonderfull Wife, now those times are always special to me because with what I do I'm not home a lot. The light was just right and I've wanted to do something with that picture for a while. The little froggy's story is sorta the same wife and I where at kellys point(another park) and we went home a different way than usual and found yet another park this one a bit of a wetland area, we where walking around and all these little frogs where jumping around. I decided to try to take a picture of one, and came up with that, again its the interesting texture of the leaves, with the darks and lights, and the moisture of the frog, that I find interesting.. feel free please to add whatever you want, crop, change colors, and generally have fun.. btw the trees in the first image are huge.....120' tall plus.... theres no human element for reference. wife gets on me about that... but somehow to me it reminds me of simpler places, and times...


RG

Scarefishcrow
12-05-2008, 11:13 AM
Bill, what kinda little frog is that?



RG

A little green and brown one.:smug:

Ok, I'll check my field guides; couldn't make it a fish, could you? Had to be a froggy!


I love the forest scene and what you describe as your thoughts about the light was what struck me instantly when I saw this, RG. I think it may be one of the first times I came close to seeing values rather than the objects. The dark shadows framing the sides, the sunlight focal area and the midvalue, gray, almost lost in the haze filtered light are the trees peeking out the background.

Now if only I could place my head against a large piece of Colourfix Board or Pastel Board or Wallis and have it flow directly out my ear onto the support in one easy step. (That's probably how it works for you, right? :lol: BTW, don't worry, I'll get back to those somewhat garishly green trees that crept into Yellowstone Gorge eventually!)

Bill

Shirl Parker
12-05-2008, 01:44 PM
A little green and brown one.:smug:

Bill

:clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:

Scarefishcrow
12-05-2008, 05:13 PM
:clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:

Thanks, Shirl. See, I can be terse and to the point, occasionally!:lol:

Well, after extremely careful consideration of its anatomical features, chromatic patterns of pigmentations, analysis of its surroundings and microhabitat, estimation of its size and unique features

(and looking at the Audubon Field Guide pictures of little brown and green frogs found on the forest floor of the woodlands in the Pacific Northwest that are so common that when hollywood needs a sound clip for a woodsy nightscene they almost always go out and record this one)

in my professional zoological opinion "What we have here is a failllluuure to communnnicaaate!" (Oops, sorry about that; slipped off track into an old Strother Martin line from that Paul Newman film Cool Hand Luke!:o ),

Let's try that again, I think it is a Pacific Treefrog! Or, more appropriately the species Pseudacris regilla, formerly known as Hyla regilla, and actually belonging to the Genus Pseudacris that are commonly known as "Chorus Frogs". So the Pacific Tree Frog is actually not a Tree Frog but a Chorus Frog. Can change color morphs seasonlly between green and brown forms.

All of which I knew before I ever read all of this at this link on Wikipedia, mind you (everyone believes me, right????):


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyla_regilla

:smug: Bill :smug:

Pat Isaac
12-05-2008, 05:21 PM
That doesn't look like the same frog to me.....not as cute..

Pat

truck driver
12-05-2008, 06:04 PM
Now if only I could place my head against a large piece of Colourfix Board or Pastel Board or Wallis and have it flow directly out my ear onto the support in one easy step.
Bill

If I could only afford a large piece of colourfix, or pastel board, or wallis.. perhaps it would flow out of my ears onto such a surface, but nope never has flowed out of my ears before...Expeccially onto those surfaces

By the way thanks for the info on the pacific tree frog.. sure was a bunch of these little guys jumping around, as for size think about the size of the end of your finger. little is the word for it.. now to figure out how to draw those darn trees :)

RG

truck driver
12-05-2008, 06:10 PM
Also note, it seems that they are extremely short of christmas trees in southern california, and well this is oregon, so they cut down a bunch of "weeds" and are sending em down to southern cali, and I have to take em down there, will leave about 4:00a.m. and be home prlly thurs, or friday..

RG

Shirl Parker
12-05-2008, 06:10 PM
Here's a cute frog
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Dec-2008/113427-Jigsaw_Frog.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Dec-2008/113427-ist2_4636165_frog_watching_tv.jpg

truck driver
12-05-2008, 06:15 PM
I love the forest scene and what you describe as your thoughts about the light was what struck me instantly when I saw this, RG. I think it may be one of the first times I came close to seeing values rather than the objects. The dark shadows framing the sides, the sunlight focal area and the midvalue, gray, almost lost in the haze filtered light are the trees peeking out the background

Bill

If thats all that comes out of this challenge, it was worth it then my friend :)

RG

Scarefishcrow
12-05-2008, 08:26 PM
That doesn't look like the same frog to me.....not as cute..

Pat

:lol: :eek: Pat, in all the taxonomic descriptions I have read in my life as a biologist, I have yet to see "cute" as a character having been resorted to in the diagnosis of the species description or in identification keys. :p :lol:

Bill

Scarefishcrow
12-05-2008, 08:42 PM
Here's a cute frog
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Dec-2008/113427-Jigsaw_Frog.jpg


You mean Dendrobates auratas, the Green and Black Poison Dart Frog (You might even say "To Die For Cute" since this is where they extract poisons like Curare from the skin which is generally so colorful it says "Go ahead and eat me. It'll be the last "Cute" little tree frog you ever eat!)

Frog identification doubters might wish to look particularly at the rightmost, top picture in this link to see how variable frog coloration can be (not to mention any specific names like Pat's or anything :evil: :lol: )
http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/pictures/Dendrobates_auratus.html

Your resident ICHTHYOLOGIST (= we don't normally DO frogs) :cool:
BILL

Scarefishcrow
12-05-2008, 08:43 PM
If thats all that comes out of this challenge, it was worth it then my friend :)

RG

Correct you are you old "Weed Hauler"!

Bill

robertsloan2
12-06-2008, 10:08 AM
Bill, what kinda little frog is that?


As to the images, I wasnt trying to be tricky, or throw a curveball, I have been playing with light in images and havent been so succesfull with it so i kind of cheated and threw that image in to see how others deal with it. The picture was taken on one of the many portland area nature trails, this is one in Beaverton, Or. I spent a wonderfull day walking in the woods with my wonderfull Wife, now those times are always special to me because with what I do I'm not home a lot. The light was just right and I've wanted to do something with that picture for a while. The little froggy's story is sorta the same wife and I where at kellys point(another park) and we went home a different way than usual and found yet another park this one a bit of a wetland area, we where walking around and all these little frogs where jumping around. I decided to try to take a picture of one, and came up with that, again its the interesting texture of the leaves, with the darks and lights, and the moisture of the frog, that I find interesting.. feel free please to add whatever you want, crop, change colors, and generally have fun.. btw the trees in the first image are huge.....120' tall plus.... theres no human element for reference. wife gets on me about that... but somehow to me it reminds me of simpler places, and times...


RG

I was wondering. They gave me an impression of huge anyway, and then I looked at the scale of the ferns and wondered about that. They must be tall ferns, not little ankle depth ferns I ran into in forests out on the East Coast. That whole scene screams "draw a dinosaur" to me, it's conifers and ferns, it demands some large animal crashing through it from the dawn of time. I'm very tempted.

Scarefishcrow
12-06-2008, 07:48 PM
I was wondering. They gave me an impression of huge anyway, and then I looked at the scale of the ferns and wondered about that. They must be tall ferns, not little ankle depth ferns I ran into in forests out on the East Coast. That whole scene screams "draw a dinosaur" to me, it's conifers and ferns, it demands some large animal crashing through it from the dawn of time. I'm very tempted.


Are you talking about the tree scene or the frog??? I'm confused? (So what's new).


Bill

robertsloan2
12-06-2008, 11:16 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Dec-2008/70184-BrownGreenFrog.jpg

Brown and Green Frog, 2 1/2" x 3 1/2"
Cretacolor Aqua Stic on Rich Beige Colourfix sanded pastel paper.

I was talking about the tree scene, that it gave the impression of very large trees and primeval forest. Suitable for posing dinosaurs in. I'm still considering doing a dinosaur within it, but tonight I wound up doing the little frog for a lark on an ACEO.

Scarefishcrow
12-06-2008, 11:25 PM
Good one Robert, Two frogs with one dart.

Nice job.

Bill

robertsloan2
12-06-2008, 11:59 PM
Thanks! Yeah, it came out pretty neat. I think I want to do something larger with the forest though, not an ACEO. And use softer oil pastels, maybe going at it with the colour shaper. Aqua Stic are still relatively hard compared to the others.

shamanmoon
12-09-2008, 10:16 AM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Dec-2008/23206-Dec._Monthly_Challange_1st_State.jpg

I am going to try my hand at this month's challenge.

This is the first state, laying in colors and values roughly. I used Holbis and Senns and have given them a few days to set.

4" x 5.25" or 10.2cm x 13.5cm aprox. on museum board.

Pat Isaac
12-09-2008, 10:21 AM
What a great start.....love all those textures.

Pat

Scarefishcrow
12-09-2008, 10:30 AM
Shy,

Off to a great start. Look forward to the finish.

Bill

sundiver
12-10-2008, 10:01 PM
Nice little gem, Robert!
shamanmoon, good start!

shamanmoon
12-10-2008, 10:54 PM
Thanks, to you all for the encouragement. It is moving forward as time allows and hope to post the second state tomorrow.

P&B,

Shy

AngelaF
12-12-2008, 07:00 AM
Nice colorful frog, Robert.
Glad to see you jumping in, Shamanmoon. Love the color and texture on what you have done thus far, can't believe it is that small though, reads much larger.

sundiver
12-13-2008, 05:05 PM
Here's my attempt. The indoor and outdoor photo are both here, because the real one looks somewhere in between and I couldn't get accurate colour in either.
It's 8 1/2 x 11 on dark green Canson, will be cropped to 8x10. It was not the best choice of surface. The lights and yellows weren't showing well, so I went over the page with W&N clear gesso (it's thick so doesn't buckle the paper).
I may add some soft pastel later. I'm not thrilled with it but knew it would be challenging for me so that's ok.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Dec-2008/6393-o.p._project_december_08.jpg
edit: On here it looks like feathers! Yeesh.

shamanmoon
12-13-2008, 05:16 PM
Wendy,

What a wonderful painting. I really like the way you simplified the composition giving it depth and a lovely sense of filtered light. I like the way both turned out though I prefer the warmer colors.

Now I've really got to work on my version.

P&B,

Shy

Scarefishcrow
12-13-2008, 07:08 PM
Wendy,

This is a marvelous interpretation of the scene and you really captured the value differences that highlight that beautiful shaft of diagonal light slicing through the overstory to the verdant forest floor.

I can understand exactly what you mean about the yellows and highlights. I think you want them to "sing" a bit more in contrast with the remainder of the scene really emphasizing the brightness of the sunlight penetrating a rather dense, moist, hazy forest scene.

It is a beautifully composed and rendered work nonetheless. If you make some changes please share with us as it is lovely.

Bill

robertsloan2
12-13-2008, 10:49 PM
Wendy, that is spectacular. Thanks for posting both indoor and outdoor photos to give a good idea of the color. I love the depth and richness of your rendering. I may give this one a try, it's beautiful.

Pat Isaac
12-14-2008, 10:30 AM
Wonderful interpretation of the scene, Wendy. I like the one on the left best, more yellow and not quite so blue. Some more light in the back of the painting would add to the contrast. Actually, looking at it more, there does seem to be a greater feeling of light in the painting on the right....nice atmosphere.

Pat

eyepaint
12-17-2008, 11:45 PM
Here's the frog. Sennelier on 9x12" paper coated with colourfix primer.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-Dec-2008/96240-IMGP6070.JPG

Cheers,

Pat Isaac
12-18-2008, 07:37 AM
This little frog moves around.....The contrast of the paper and the frog are outstanding.

Pat

Scarefishcrow
12-18-2008, 10:39 AM
I agree with Pat, EP.

But it looks soooooo Blue!!!!:(

But maybe this is a HAPPY Blue??

I'm still looking at that photo and trying to figure out if there is another frog peeping out from under the vegetation near the left foot of this frog. Seems there might be to my.

Bill

eyepaint
12-18-2008, 01:25 PM
Pat and Bill - thank you. Somehow I distorted the frog shape to really exaggerate the difference in widths of his eye/forehead area and the torso not including the legs. Ah well... He's his own fellow, and only distantly related to the guy in the ref photo :)

Scarefishcrow
12-18-2008, 04:17 PM
Pat and Bill - thank you. Somehow I distorted the frog shape to really exaggerate the difference in widths of his eye/forehead area and the torso not including the legs. Ah well... He's his own fellow, and only distantly related to the guy in the ref photo :)

We already have a photo, EP, your job is to infuse it with your own special style and interpretation, which you have done.

Bill

truck driver
12-27-2008, 07:43 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/27-Dec-2008/136518-tree_challenge.jpg

Senneliers on black colourfix paper 9X12 still a work in progress

RG

truck driver
12-27-2008, 07:44 PM
EP: I like your frog, great work.

truck driver
12-27-2008, 07:45 PM
Wendy, as always great work, I love the light and your simplification of the image, awesome!

RG

truck driver
12-27-2008, 07:47 PM
Robertsloan2: nice work on the frog
shannamoon: looking forward to an update you are off to a really nice start.

RG

robertsloan2
12-27-2008, 10:00 PM
RG, yours is going to be spectacular. Even at an early stage it's so striking! Cool idea using black Colourfix.

truck driver
12-28-2008, 12:50 AM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/27-Dec-2008/136518-tree_challenge2.jpg It progresses, however it looks much more impressive than this scan for some reason its not showing the texture of the grass, or the dead log, and the blending of the trees isnt nearly as off as this would suggest.. wierd.

RG

Pat Isaac
12-28-2008, 10:32 AM
Coming along nicely, RG. I like the richness of the color.

Pat

robertsloan2
12-28-2008, 12:38 PM
RG, it's frustrating when scans don't show some of the best parts of the work. It's coming along great. You're tempting me to do it now, at least try a sketch of it.

robertsloan2
12-28-2008, 01:16 PM
Well, here's my version -- much simpler and looser than most of the ones I love, but it's very small. It's only 2 1/2" x 3 1/2" on white Wallis sanded pastel paper with Neopastels, using only the colors in my 12 color tin.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/28-Dec-2008/70184-ForestLight.jpg

I did a little scratching for some highlights, but I don't think the Wallis is as good for that as the Colourfix for some reason. Might have something with the different type of surface though both are sanded.

Pat Isaac
12-28-2008, 01:50 PM
Yikes, that is so tiny....beautiful streaming sunlight.

Pat

Scarefishcrow
12-28-2008, 05:23 PM
RG, yours is coming along very well.

Robert, where do you get those machines that shrink full size works down to those micro sizes when you are done??
Actually, pretty good sketch for the size and speed which you did it in!!

Bill
(December isn't over, I still have time!!!!!!!):eek:

robertsloan2
12-28-2008, 07:22 PM
Thanks! I'm used to working at that size. For a year or two now I've been doing a lot of ACEOs and ATCs and I just got used to that scale. Even when I was a kid I was used to working small though.

Large works tend to take a long time, so every once in a while it's a relief to me to do something little that I can finish in one intense session. I love the Neopastels texture too, that helped.

Scarefishcrow
12-29-2008, 05:18 PM
Well, if I'm lucky the uploader won't work! :lol:
NeoColorII underpainting on Frederix Watercolor Canvas
Final layer Sennelier

8x10

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/29-Dec-2008/108067-PC290009.JPG

BILL

Pat Isaac
12-29-2008, 06:04 PM
Nice interpretation of the landscape, Bill. It has a very abstract feel to it. I like the limited palette and almost moody effect. A small suggestion. I think the foreground could be darker so that there is more depth to the painting.

Pat

Scarefishcrow
12-29-2008, 06:08 PM
I think you are right. Funny, these things never come out like I think they are! They seem to have a life of their own.

Also, this is what happens when you have been reading a new painting book (The Painterly Approach by Bob Rohm) and decide to see if you can apply what they are talking about. Reduce scene to a few shapes and no more than 5 values, preferably 4 and work from there.

Interesting book.

Funny, I started this as a cheery sunbeam penetrating a dense forest and ended up painting the dark forest instead :lol: .


Bill

Pat Isaac
12-29-2008, 06:12 PM
No matter, it works...

Pat

shamanmoon
12-30-2008, 12:09 AM
Thanks for the encouragement RG, but this month has been a bear. I like what you are doing very much. I've made some more strokes on my own, but want to resolve somethings and will probably post again in the new year.

Bill, I also like what you're doing. There is a quality to the contrast of darks and lights that I'm trying to figure out in my own work.

A very happy New Year to all, wishing you peace, prosperity, contentment, health and love,

shy

Scarefishcrow
12-30-2008, 07:00 PM
Thanks, Shy. It is a very enchanting reference, but it really is elusive to get where you want to go with it!

Bill

robertsloan2
12-30-2008, 07:03 PM
Bill, yours is magnificent. You captured the light. This is definitely one of your best. I love how you got the trees and the ferns in the light -- you followed the light so well. That approach of focusing on values and shapes seriously helped in this one. Beautiful!

Scarefishcrow
12-30-2008, 07:10 PM
Thanks, Robert!

Scarefishcrow
01-06-2009, 11:44 PM
xpost to Weekly Sketch Thread

Made some adjustments to the forest painting to try and improve value relationships. Here's the result:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Jan-2009/108067-2009-01-06_22-33-08_0053.jpg

Bill:wave:

Pat Isaac
01-07-2009, 07:59 AM
I like the dark trees, but in the process I think you lost some of the great light in the center...need to put some more light there. I also like the painterly feel.

Pat

Scarefishcrow
01-07-2009, 05:17 PM
I like the dark trees, but in the process I think you lost some of the great light in the center...need to put some more light there. I also like the painterly feel.

Pat

Yes, I agree, Pat. But I'm seeing that is part of the learning process. It seems so easy to "know" what you want to do, but only by doing and, as most people would tend to say, "failing" do I take a step toward eventually creating the "balance" of darks AND midtones AND lights that, when they finally come together, click as one of those, "Yeah, that's what I want." moments. I've had some close calls, but unfortunately we think they all ought to be that. Just isn't that easy, is it??

That book on the best seller list certainly didn't come out of the word processor, got to the publisher and have the editor say, "Perfect as usual, print 'em up and ship 'em out!".

To paraphrase Michaelangelo, who state something to the effect that a piece of good art should deceive the viewer into thinking the work whose birth was a long and painful labor appeared in its final state effortlessly. So we look at great art and think "Oh how talented and how wonderful it must have been to be able to so adeptly paint these masterpieces with great ease and innate ability!"

Then we read about the true angst that they all suffered through their works. Anything done really well does not come easily, does it, Pat???

Bill:wave:

shamanmoon
01-07-2009, 05:19 PM
Happy New Year all. Wishing us all a healthy and productive New Year.

Bill, I agree with Pat. I like the way it has developed but feel as if you lost the streaming light. Personally I like using complimentary colors and see that you have some purples which would make some nice yellows work well in the center. Just throwing out an idea.

P&B,

Shy

Pat Isaac
01-07-2009, 05:28 PM
Yeah, I understand that. I often have an image in my head and then I look at the painting and think...:eek: ...that is not what I want...so sometimes I start again and sometimes I rework it and sometimes I think Okay, that was a learning process, move on...does that make sense?....

Pat

shamanmoon
01-07-2009, 05:43 PM
Bill,

You must have been responding to Pat at the same time as I was offering my 2 cents.

We all face this. If something is important to me, I will often do over three or four times. It either works or it doesn't for myself. But it really depends on how important it is to you and your process of expression.

In the end, if I am happy with something, it doesn't matter what anyone else says good or bad. I know within myself if it matters or not.

P&B,

Shy

Scarefishcrow
01-07-2009, 05:44 PM
Absolutely. I clipped a chunk of prose out of a post I was making to Xina regarding this month's challenge I am going to edit into a Talk thread since it began to run long.

Basically I've been reading some good books on painting lately and though self obvious to the experienced painter and repeately told to me by people such as yourself and Wendell, the 2x4 slowly begins to get your attention and it comes as these small epiphanies what people have been saying all along. Then you realize now you are a step closer to accomplishing it, but just knowing what is needed is still a journey away from being able to take the elements and assemble them properly.

A book by Greg Kreutz I was reading last night put is something like you need to be willing to risk reworking something that might be ok to achieve something that really sings. It is always a gamble you may make it worse, or just shift the problem somewhere else, but you have to be willing to make your private problem public and try. He said he thought in MOST cases it is worth trying to rework and even risk ruining adequate to make progress.

I'm sure he put it much more gracefully, but I guess that's one of my little epiphanies. It's just a piece of support and paints. Should I be happy with ok and stick it in a file somewhere to later show me how much better I have become or should I continue to try things and (as with Autumn Sunlight) eventually come to a point of saying, ok, I'm just spinning my wheels and it's time to move on.

As Dan McCaw says, sometimes to maintain intensity of the paint when altering its value you can use colors other than white and black. But the tradeoff is that to maintain intensity you might have to saccrifice some of the fineness of gradation along the values range. There are always compromises you have to make in art to achieve what you want.

Bill
:wave:

Scarefishcrow
01-07-2009, 06:36 PM
Happy New Year all. Wishing us all a healthy and productive New Year.

Bill, I agree with Pat. I like the way it has developed but feel as if you lost the streaming light. Personally I like using complimentary colors and see that you have some purples which would make some nice yellows work well in the center. Just throwing out an idea.

P&B,

Shy

Actually, Shy, that is exactly what I was trying for as a sense of light. I just didn't quite make it. Thanks for the comment!

And also thanks for your comments regarding reworking. I agree with you. A lesson is a lesson.



Bill:wave:

truck driver
01-08-2009, 01:07 AM
Nothing ventured Nothing gained, no pain no gain. so on and so forth.. you cant fix it until you get it wrong :) cant learn unless you make mistakes. The painter who never makes mistakes.. Never paints anything... You know the guy at work who never does anything wrong? guess what he doesnt do anything.. no matter what you are doing if you want to get better you have to reach outside yourself. When you do that you are GONNA screw up. but only then do you know that aint how you do that.. you keep trying until you figure out, THATS how you do that. not that I am a great one to be talking about great works of art.. Cuz my work aint great. As I said before I dont know when/how to give up... thats my biggest fault.. I'll keep bashing my head against a brick wall long after I have a headache, until the wall caves in.. to many people stop when it starts to crack. but in particular with you Bill, I want to thank you for your insight, and aproach that you bring. You are always well researched and thoughtfull when you speak, thank you for that. now on to your painting. yep you killed the light. dead...
however there was something I was reading in one of the oil painting thread. It had to do with scraping paint off and using the ghost image to build layers on top of the ghost image, i.e. paint a layer scrape it back, then paint another layer, and scrape it back.. keeping the layers ultra thin. I've been wondering if this aproach would work at all with ops... in other words scrape back the dead section and bring it back lighter and blend it in.. I've also wondered if a thick brush would even phase ops.. dont know but I'll be finding out..

RG

truck driver
01-08-2009, 01:08 AM
boy that was a ramble

RG

robertsloan2
01-08-2009, 02:16 AM
Actually, scraping back with oil pastels can work very well. It usually leaves a pale layer of the first color that got applied. I think it might work if you overdid it on an area to scrape back and redo it, especially if the mistake was in the last layers. The only possible problem would be blending the new work at the edges with the old, which might take a little more scraping and some back and forthing.

Your ramble is awesome.

I paint and draw better than I did before and not as well as I will. That's been the only consistent way I can ever judge my art -- or my writing, for that matter. Sometimes though, professionals get locked into a style by what the market liked and their experiments get rejected as not being like their old stuff, especially when they go in new directions. It's one reason I try to be diverse right off, so no one gets all shocked if I go to doing landscapes after a series of cats.

Scarefishcrow
01-08-2009, 10:53 PM
Thanks, RG.........I think! I may have to research it a bit to determine for sure.

BTW, that's the beauty of OP. You can always scrape it off and start over. That's why I always try to use a support that won't give up before I do!!!~!:clap: :clap:

RG, sounds like you had more nitrous at the dentist than I did!:lol:

Nothing ventured Nothing gained, no pain no gain. so on and so forth.. you cant fix it until you get it wrong :) cant learn unless you make mistakes. The painter who never makes mistakes.. Never paints anything... You know the guy at work who never does anything wrong? guess what he doesnt do anything.. no matter what you are doing if you want to get better you have to reach outside yourself. When you do that you are GONNA screw up. but only then do you know that aint how you do that.. you keep trying until you figure out, THATS how you do that. not that I am a great one to be talking about great works of art.. Cuz my work aint great. As I said before I dont know when/how to give up... thats my biggest fault.. I'll keep bashing my head against a brick wall long after I have a headache, until the wall caves in.. to many people stop when it starts to crack. but in particular with you Bill, I want to thank you for your insight, and aproach that you bring. You are always well researched and thoughtfull when you speak, thank you for that. now on to your painting. yep you killed the light. dead...
however there was something I was reading in one of the oil painting thread. It had to do with scraping paint off and using the ghost image to build layers on top of the ghost image, i.e. paint a layer scrape it back, then paint another layer, and scrape it back.. keeping the layers ultra thin. I've been wondering if this aproach would work at all with ops... in other words scrape back the dead section and bring it back lighter and blend it in.. I've also wondered if a thick brush would even phase ops.. dont know but I'll be finding out..

RG