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Scarefishcrow
11-01-2008, 02:00 PM
Due to unexpected circumstances that have come up, REISA will not be able to host this month's challenge. I appreciate her gracious offer so far back and hope that the circumstances that have complicated her life at the moment will, as soon as possible allow her more time.

I will be hosting the November Oil Pastel Challenge and invite everyone that is interested to select one or both reference images that I have chosen from my photographs this summer and give us your interpretation. You may crop, alter, omit or add as your artistic vision dictates as long as it is derived from inspiration from the Reference Images. I really look forward to contribution from lots of people and I'm sure they will be as beautiful as they are varied.

Please give the type of support uses, brand(s) of OP used, and the actual size of the work. Any other technical details or notes are always appreciated.

The reference images follow. The first is a shot taken from inside a crumbling old building that used to house, among other things, the post office when I was a child. My grandmother was substitute postmistress and let me help cancel the stamps with the big wood handled rubber stamp and inkpad when noone was around. Many fond memories now crumbling away with time. The second image is a flower (a favorite of both Pat and my Avatar), a sunflower brightly lit by the summer sun with the dancing shadows on its lovely yellow petals.

Good luck with your efforts:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/01-Nov-2008/108067-RMBldg.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/01-Nov-2008/108067-sunflower.jpg


Thanks,

BILL:thumbsup:

Pat Isaac
11-01-2008, 02:37 PM
Thanks for hosting this month, Bill. Love these photos.

Pat

robertsloan2
11-01-2008, 03:57 PM
These are great, Bill! Thanks for the story as well as the references, they are inspiring. Thanks for hosting this month. Hope Reisa's doing okay.

Scarefishcrow
11-01-2008, 05:50 PM
These are great, Bill! Thanks for the story as well as the references, they are inspiring. Thanks for hosting this month. Hope Reisa's doing okay.

My pleasure. I think Reisa will be fine. It is mostly a matter of life's periodic complications that have left her "running to stay" in place and has greatly impacted her time regimen. I prefer to remain optimisting in such situations that they will eventually settle down and all will work out well. That is always my hope. She regretted greatly having to cancel and looks forward to a point in time when she will be able to be again more active in the forum.

Thank you for the comments on the photos. I have always loved photography but was never patient with film and the waiting. Digital has made all the difference in the world. It can lead to rather lazy approach to photography by allowing one to take lots of shots and always crop and adjust in software.

I try to follow the dictum of most professional photographers that it is much more effective to think creatively, consider composition in the viewfinder and I absolutely love the auto braketing feature since the dynamic range of digital (and even film) is not that of the human eye. Thus, even a "good" exposure may lack details and proper color/light balance in certain areas. By bracketing at least 3 exposures you accomplish two things simultaneously. First you hedge your bets on getting a good exposure, and particularly as an artist you get a series of photos each of which may contain better information for certain areas of the composition than the others. So as references for art they can provide invaluable data to accurately depict what you wish in the scenes.

The instant feedback and low cost allows large numbers of alternate framings, points of view and distances, asl well as manual adjustment for special effects.

I also like the feature of high burst rates for capturing action and seeing sequential movement in a series of photos. I use this feature on my Olympus SP 570 UZ at the highest rate of 15 fps when phographing things like beach surf that allows me to catch a breaking wave at the exact moment that I wish for compositional impact. I used to covet extremely expensive SLR Digitals with long range zoom lenses (even have one of the early Canon 60D's with an assortment of lenses topped by the 100-400, Image Stabilized, Autofocus L-series lens that (with the 1.6 scaling factor acts as an effective 640 mm equivalent of a 35 mm lens. However, I have discovered I simply am not a bird photographer and now with the development of the Ultrazooms like my Olympus I can get the equivalent of a 540 mm lens on a 35 mm camera and it has both Optical Lens as well as sensor movement stabilizing systems. At 10 Mp highest resolution it is more than capable of producing enlargements that I will ever need. In fact, along with the digital imaging software I can produce enticing images that fool even a professional like you as with the dinner plate dahlia. I find this enjoyable and if the result is pleasing and artistically coherent, then what is the difference between that and a painting. I enjoy both.

So many uses for digital imaging in even traditional art for helping simplify images, convert color to gray scales and analyze values, adjust color, saturation, posterize, etc. These all can lead to inspiration for what becomes a painting.

Nothing wrong with being a "purist" if that is what you like. But if that philosophy has reigned supreme we would never have moved to many of the innovations in art that are now considered traditional.

BABBLE ALERT AND DRIFTING SERIOUSLY OT. Should Start new thread for this discussion if you are interested Robert.

Bill

mysurface
11-02-2008, 06:48 PM
Great photo, Bill!
The old post office will be really a challenge for me. I like the sunflower too.

mysurface
11-04-2008, 11:31 AM
First attempt, I carefully works on the petal on ATC black mounting board. Again, due to the opaqueness of yellows, this is only what I can achieved.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/04-Nov-2008/155060-sunflower1.JPG

Second attempt, I am trying to waive my op to sketch out the sun flower without blending it, And this is another one.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/04-Nov-2008/155060-sunflower2.JPG

Which one is better?

Sorry, I am using camera phone for the shot, it does not appear to be very clear.

Scarefishcrow
11-04-2008, 12:15 PM
Ong, both a great attempts and I think you did well capturing the essence of the flower. I think I like the color on the second one a little better than the first try.

Yellows can be tough, expecially on such a dark background,

Good job.

Bill

eyepaint
11-04-2008, 02:30 PM
Oh goodie, Bill, a flower. I've heard you looove painting flowers in OP. You also like making them blue. Can't wait to see a blue sunflower from you :) :) :)

(running away, not in a straight line....)

Cheers,

Pat Isaac
11-04-2008, 04:36 PM
:lol: :lol: EP, what are you thinking.....
Great sunflowers, Ong. The yellows are very frustrating and I often do yellow flowers, always thinking, what are you doing??? Anyway, they are transparent and it takes patience to build up the yellows....

Pat

robertsloan2
11-04-2008, 04:43 PM
Both of your sunflowers are great, mysurface. Very powerful, loose and dramatic coming out of the black. I like the color in the second one a bit more, but you got a hair more opaqueness in the first.

Have you tried doing a value underpainting just with white on these before laying down any yellows? Yellows do seem transparent sometimes, but whites are usually opaque. I work with black paper a lot with colored pencils and that tends to make a big difference when I do it.

Scarefishcrow
11-04-2008, 07:01 PM
Oh, EP, you just looove to jerk my chain. An I love it when you do. I may just turn that sunflower blue just for you. Gotta run, late for my oil class.

Bill

mysurface
11-04-2008, 07:53 PM
Thanks everyone.
@Robert, I didn't do underpaint for this 2 piece. I only have my two set of OP with me right now, I don't have other material for underpaint. May be I should also try to underpaint it with OP such as white? or brown? or even can be underpaint with colour pencil? I need more experiment for that.

eyepaint
11-05-2008, 05:38 PM
ong - good studies and good for you for challenging yourself to do it without blending.


Here's my version of the sunflowers. Look, Bill, it's NOT blue :) Limited pallete Sennelier on 9x12" watercolour paper coated with terracotta colourfix primer.


http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Nov-2008/96240-IMGP5706.JPG



Cheers,

Scarefishcrow
11-05-2008, 05:54 PM
EP, It's not blue, but it is definitely psychodelic. I'd stay away from the seeds in that sunflower!:lol:

Bill

Pat Isaac
11-05-2008, 10:39 PM
Great painterly sunflower, EP. Don't you just love that terracotta.

Pat

robertsloan2
11-12-2008, 04:25 PM
That's so dramatic, EP! I love the Colourfix surface, it's so strong and the colors are so rich and tempting. Your cool and warm contrasts are great and I like how you got so much variation with a limited palette. What colors did you use?

eyepaint
11-12-2008, 09:22 PM
Bill, Pat, and Robert - thank you. I used two blues (don't know the names), two yellows (gold and naples), and a red. And a colour shaper.

robertsloan2
11-12-2008, 09:36 PM
That is so great. I thought you had a primary color harmony going, it's beautiful!

truck driver
11-13-2008, 03:17 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Nov-2008/136518-sunflower.JPG


Actually got started on this may have to leave to go to work in a little bit so thought I would at least show you all this..

RG

Pat Isaac
11-13-2008, 04:21 PM
Wonderful start, RG. I like the dark background. Better to let it set up when dealing with those yellows...

Pat

truck driver
11-13-2008, 04:27 PM
This was done on grey canson pastel paper 9 x 12, using cray pas expressionists, and senneliers. Mostly used the crey pas for the black, and a yellow underpainting.

RG

Scarefishcrow
11-13-2008, 07:40 PM
Great start, RG. Something about the contrast of yellow with a dark background that is dynamic.

ElleZee
11-14-2008, 06:54 AM
OMGosh!!!!.....FINALLY....I have something to post in a challenge, BEFORE the month is over!!!!! :lol: :evil: That is the biggest challenge for me! :lol:

I chose the Sunflower...but I have hopes for that post office too! But baby steps, here's the first one....

My initial sketch to work out my values, and comp. I can't seem to shake doing a prelim sketch. I figured I share it.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Nov-2008/67205-IMG_9564_sm.jpg

and here's the WIP. I am planning on using some turps in the bg, but I'll see. I am trying to blend less and less. Like in the Nov/Dec issue of the Oil Speil (Great Newsletter BTW! loved the demo) So, far this has only blending done with the sticks themselves.

Sennelier artist quality OP's on matt board. Size is 8"x9" This is taken at the 2 hour point.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Nov-2008/67205-nov08opchallenge_sm.jpg

Scarefishcrow
11-14-2008, 11:51 AM
Lori,

Your sunflower is looking marvelous. Thanks for posting the WIP stages. That is always helpful to see.

Bill

eyepaint
11-14-2008, 12:08 PM
Robert - great start. Keep us posted.

Lori - I really enjoy your prelim sketch. I can't see what remains to be done on the OP version (but then again I like raw paintings :) )

robertsloan2
11-14-2008, 01:17 PM
Great start, Robert. Yours is very dramatic. I like the black background.

Lori, your preliminary sketch is elegant. I like where you're going with this.

Pat Isaac
11-14-2008, 03:01 PM
Stunning, Lori. From the initial sketch to the OP. I like the mottled look of the background and the contrast with the sunflower. Excellent.

Pat

ElleZee
11-14-2008, 06:24 PM
Thanks for the comments, all! I may just leave it as is. I kind of like the energy the current bg is giving the piece IRL. In the photo the red support shows through more than it actually stands out for real.

Ong - Both are very pleasing! Are you going to try the Post Office?
EP - Vibrant as usual! Wow, you always make subjects dance!
Robert - can't wait to see your update! You're off to a wonderful start.

Scarefishcrow
11-14-2008, 10:05 PM
Thanks for the comments, all! I may just leave it as is. I kind of like the energy the current bg is giving the piece IRL. In the photo the red support shows through more than it actually stands out for real.

.

Lori,

I have been pondering values and color lately and thought I would see what your sunflower looked like as a 4 value image. It was pretty impressive in the way it formed an almost perfect gradation of values. Just for the heck of it, here's what it looks like in four values:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Nov-2008/108067-gs67205-nov08opchallenge_sm.jpg

I just thought it was an interesting effect that seems to suggest to me the piece is working well as is.

Bill:thumbsup:

robertsloan2
11-15-2008, 12:04 AM
Lori, I'm glad you didn't smooth out the background texture. I forgot to mention how much I liked your background texture and the beautiful way it shaded. It's inspiring me to do more textured things in future!

ElleZee
11-15-2008, 06:53 AM
Thanks Bill! Pretty neat! :cool: Tell me, what do you look for when evalutating a piece with this method? That you have at least the three distinct ranges: dark, medium, light? That type of thing? I am interested to learn more about this. Is there a thread on WC! already existing that talks about it?

Robert - Thanks for the compliment. I am trying hard in both my acrylic painting and my OP work to use more broken colour techniques. I have a tendency to blend and I want to let the eye mix the colour. That's the goal, any way LOL. I have a hard time achieving it, but this piece is starting to have a nice energy in the bg that makes the flower look like it's in the wind. Plus, with the bg being such a big area of this painting I want to keep it interesting. My painting instructor tells me bg is just as important as the subject.

That's what makes the monthly challenges so great, I find I allow myself a little more experimental license then I do on say, a commission. Sometimes they work....many times they don't...:evil: But that is how one learns, correct? Or at least that's my story and I am stickin' to it!

Scarefishcrow
11-15-2008, 02:09 PM
Thanks Bill! Pretty neat! :cool: Tell me, what do you look for when evalutating a piece with this method? That you have at least the three distinct ranges: dark, medium, light? That type of thing? I am interested to learn more about this. Is there a thread on WC! already existing that talks about it?



I guess that's what I'm trying to educate myself on. I think basically you want to have variation (often 3) levels of value represented, but also my impression is that you want to make sure that they are in some sort of coherent and pleasing arrangement that gives a sense of balance. Here I thought it was interesting that the values graded from one side to the other in a dramatic sense I had not noticed in the colored piece. Also the play of the dark values in the left part of the background contrasted with the midvalues in the right and the lighter values of the flower at the interface of the two tied them together.

There's no thread, but I have been working on an article I hope to put in OPS's Oil Spiel newsletter soon showing how using grayscale conversion can help a beginner like me understand how to recognize value patterns better. (The squinting can really get to me sometimes). The other thing I want to demonstrate is how you can make color charts from your OPs when you get them, scan them and make a true grayscale image and have a quick reference to help you relate color to value. I have started doing my color charts on midgray toned background and when I scan and convert to grayscale then you can almost instantly get an idea of the end of the value scale the colors fall just by seeing if it is darker or lighter than the mid gray.

Keep an eye on the Oil Spiel. Hopefully I can put something together (though I'm no expert) that folks like you can find interesting and helpful. Suggestions and comments always welcome.

Bill:thumbsup:

Pat Isaac
11-15-2008, 02:23 PM
Interesting conversion, Bill. I have always found that converting an image to grayscale is very helpful.

Pat

ElleZee
11-15-2008, 05:48 PM
Thanks for the explanation, Bill. :thumbsup: I guess that is what I am working out in my head when I do my sketches, the old fashioned way :lol:. I'll have to try grayscale method with a few of my other pieces and see if they meet my original sketched concepts.

truck driver
11-15-2008, 06:17 PM
I guess that's what I'm trying to educate myself on. I think basically you want to have variation (often 3) levels of value represented, but also my impression is that you want to make sure that they are in some sort of coherent and pleasing arrangement that gives a sense of balance. Here I thought it was interesting that the values graded from one side to the other in a dramatic sense I had not noticed in the colored piece. Also the play of the dark values in the left part of the background contrasted with the midvalues in the right and the lighter values of the flower at the interface of the two tied them together.

There's no thread, but I have been working on an article I hope to put in OPS's Oil Spiel newsletter soon showing how using grayscale conversion can help a beginner like me understand how to recognize value patterns better. (The squinting can really get to me sometimes). The other thing I want to demonstrate is how you can make color charts from your OPs when you get them, scan them and make a true grayscale image and have a quick reference to help you relate color to value. I have started doing my color charts on midgray toned background and when I scan and convert to grayscale then you can almost instantly get an idea of the end of the value scale the colors fall just by seeing if it is darker or lighter than the mid gray.

Keep an eye on the Oil Spiel. Hopefully I can put something together (though I'm no expert) that folks like you can find interesting and helpful. Suggestions and comments always welcome.

Bill:thumbsup:

At least 3 the more the better there was an ongoing argument between michealangelo and leanardo Da'Vinci concerning the number of shades that could be represented clearly.. Da vincis take was that it was infinite, while michealangelo was more limmitted, even though his drawings, and paintings reflected more than the 16 he claimed could be clear.

RG

Scarefishcrow
11-15-2008, 09:35 PM
At least 3 the more the better there was an ongoing argument between michealangelo and leanardo Da'Vinci concerning the number of shades that could be represented clearly.. Da vincis take was that it was infinite, while michealangelo was more limmitted, even though his drawings, and paintings reflected more than the 16 he claimed could be clear.

RG

While it may be true that that many values could be represented clearly, from a compositional standpoint most painters (at leat those that lean toward a more painterly approach) would recommend against too many basic values in a work. Here we have to distinguish the concept of "relative value ranges" and their number in a painting from absolute value. The grayscale approach helps you to narrow the range of values and I would tend to disagree the more the better. IMHO, studying painterly works and reading up on this suggests that a good number of values is around 4 (3-5) depending on the particular subject. More than that tend to make a work busy and overly complex. After deciding on the number of values then you could get into a discussion of will you select those values from a High-, Mid- or Low-Key range of adjacent values since you don't want disjunct sets of values which would work against the unity of the painting.

Thanks for your comments, RG.

Bill:thumbsup:

Scarefishcrow
11-17-2008, 09:49 PM
This has a ways to go, but I thought I would show I was working on it. There is considerable smearing near the bottom half as it slipped and I hit it with my hand catching it.

Done on (I forgot). Today's work was over an underpainting that was mostly brick red OP. Today I used Craypas Specialists, an encuastic iron as a melting palette and melted the OP colors on the iron and mixed colors. I applied the melted OP with bristle brushes, adding Stand Oil and occasionaly OMS to keep the OP fluid for longer.

Will let this harden and use NeoPastel, Senns and Erengi to add details and clean up overpainting.

Comments welcome.

PS: I think I need more vaiation in values in the finish. Comments?

Bill

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-Nov-2008/108067-hometown.jpg

ElleZee
11-17-2008, 10:17 PM
Great start Bill! I see a lot of layering in your future ;o) I thought this was a really cool ref. and I hope I get the guts to try it. I have my graphite tonal sketch done.....now, I just have to get up the nerve to start somewhere.

I can't wait to see your progress shots! I'll be back.

Scarefishcrow
11-18-2008, 12:43 AM
Great start Bill! I see a lot of layering in your future ;o) I thought this was a really cool ref. and I hope I get the guts to try it. I have my graphite tonal sketch done.....now, I just have to get up the nerve to start somewhere.

I can't wait to see your progress shots! I'll be back.

I see a lot of layering in my future and I'm anxious to see progress shots, too!! :lol:

Thansks for the comments, Lori.

Bill:thumbsup:

Pat Isaac
11-18-2008, 07:28 AM
This is a good start, Bill and I like your textures. As you progress, I'd try to make the greens so green, but to add some other tones to them.

Pat

mysurface
11-18-2008, 11:44 AM
Bill, I always like Challenge thread, because I can see different paintings on the same object or same view.

I love the greenie feel of your sketch, added with the texture, it makes the old post office building becomes more aging. I look forward to the finished one.

Here is mine, it takes me sometimes to start this sketch, because I find it is challenge for me to do painting that consist of inside and outside. Outside should be brighter because of sunlight, but I have no idea how to make it brighter, adding white, makes it blurry? Any suggestions?

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/18-Nov-2008/155060-oldpostoffice_s2.JPG

Pat Isaac
11-18-2008, 04:10 PM
You have done very well with a difficult subject. I actually think the house inside through the doorway could be lighter and also the grasses in through the doorway. I like the texture of the bricks and wall.

Pat

Scarefishcrow
11-18-2008, 04:44 PM
Hean Kuan,

Great sketch. This is a tough one. I think you did a good job. I agree with Pat and might also suggest some darker texture on the inside floor. Random marks suggesting old rubble.

Bill:wave:

robertsloan2
11-19-2008, 04:20 AM
Bill, yours is evocative. That is a great idea for your first layer, and the feel of it is so powerful. I have no critique for it, you're going great and this is a beautiful beginning. It's so powerful you might keep it like that or do another just to that level.

Hean Kuan, yours is magnificent! It looks a little unfinished but I've gotten used to seeing some of your unfinished architectural ones and I am grinning at the thought of what this will become. It's a beautiful start, you're well on the way to one of your most memorable paintings!

I think the whole discussion above on values could be part of what you're running into. If the inside which is in shadow is all within a range of dark to mid values, and the outside which is in sunlight goes into stronger contrasts (with shadow areas as dark as the shadowed foreground) then it will show the sudden change in light.

The floor in the old building especially looks like variations in cool shadow color or cool neutrals. I hope this helps. You are so much better at buildings than I am that it feels like I'm the student trying to teach the master!

mysurface
11-19-2008, 11:24 AM
Finally, I completed the old post office. Thanks for looking at it. I am quite struggling with the grasses, should I paint dark colour first and cover by light colour? what combination of the colours will makes them looks more grassy?

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/19-Nov-2008/155060-oldpostoffice.JPG

Scarefishcrow
11-19-2008, 01:11 PM
This is wonderful, Hean Kuan!!

It makes me not want to do it since you did it so well. Looks just like my hometown!!

Bill:clap:

Pat Isaac
11-19-2008, 04:28 PM
This is really great! I love all your textures and strong color. I think the grasses look fine and the only thing I might add are some yellow ochres.
wonderful finish to a difficult subject.

Pat

ElleZee
11-19-2008, 07:35 PM
Mysurface - Great job on this tough subject! I am still considering giving this one a try, it is quite intimidating. Wonderful details!

mysurface
11-20-2008, 07:59 PM
Thanks Bill, Pat and blu_ize.

Bill, yours is impressive too, it is like oil paintings which it looks painterly. I look forward to see the final of yours.

Shirl Parker
11-21-2008, 11:52 AM
Somehow I managed to not subscribe to this thread the first time I went in and saw the photos for the challenge. So I am way behind in commenting. I'll be brief:

Hean Kuan, I like both your sunflowers, although I am especially partial to orange color. Your house ruins are nice. I think the inside/outside problem is moot since I don't think there is a roof and therefore all is outside:)

EP - another beauty like I would expect from you. Such pleasing colors.

RG - a good start, but I didn't see a followup. Is there more to come?

Lori - I love the grey scale sketch on it's own. Is it now a thing of the past under the other version. Well done also.

Bill - I suspect you would have more time to finish that painting if your messages were shorter :evil: :evil:

I still don't know if I will get this challenge underway myself. I thought on doing the sunflower, but not sure. Maybe I'll take up EP's challenge to Bill on the blue version.

Scarefishcrow
11-21-2008, 10:07 PM
[quote=lueur]Bill - I suspect you would have more time to finish that painting if your messages were shorter :evil: :evil:

quote]

That's an issue I have to take up with my BOSS! ( You know the one I'm talking about, the one with the halo :angel: ). I take my marching orders from her.

This is a 1 BOSS operation, and I'm NOT the BOSS!:lol: :lol: Picture of ME below:


http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/21-Nov-2008/108067-Garbage_man.gif


BILL:thumbsup:

ElleZee
11-22-2008, 09:22 AM
Lori - I love the grey scale sketch on it's own. Is it now a thing of the past under the other version. Well done also.

Oh, no I never go over my sketch...it's still alive and well :cat: I always work out my ideas on a 'thumbnail' sketch (more of a giant's thumbnail :lol: usually about 4.5"x5.5" scrap paper I have on hand) That way I can visualize and work out tonnal problems, the overall comp and shapes before I start. Then if it's a piece that has to look percise (like a commissioned dog for example) I do another large drawing (fresh by hand) then use that, once I'm satisfied with the likeness, to transfer onto my final support. So, I usually end up with a small sketch, large drawing and then the final piece. In the case of this particular sunflower, I skipped the middle larger drawing and just sketched on my matt board with a white charcoal pencil as likeness wasn't my main concern. When I do Acrylic painting I still do the sketch, and keep it on hand to refer to when I feel I have lost my focus....but I just go for it and 'draw' on my canvas with a paint brush.

Plus, it's fun to go through your sketches when you have a painters block and find one that inspires you again. I do lots of sketches that never have made it to paintings....yet anyway :wink2:

Pat Isaac
11-22-2008, 07:37 PM
I know where you are coming from, Lori. Lots of mine sit there and then I go back and get inspired to finish one.
What! what!...I'm in charge of your babble....:angel: :evil: hmmmmm...not my fault....can't seem to control him at al :lol: :lol: :lol:
Carry on.

pat

Scarefishcrow
11-22-2008, 11:00 PM
.
What! what!...I'm in charge of your babble....:angel: :evil: hmmmmm...not my fault....can't seem to control him at al :lol: :lol: :lol:
Carry on.

pat

Thanks for the unswerving support! :p :rolleyes: :evil: :D

Bill

Scarefishcrow
11-30-2008, 04:36 PM
Well, last day and looks like Shirl is right. Post shorter, paint longer. Looks like the host is going to be overdue.

Thanks to everyone that participated and commented and please feel free to continue to work on these and post your results (that way the host doesn't look quite so bad).

Tomorrow a new challenge will start hosted by Truck Driver (RG). While he is supplying the RI's he will be out of town so I will start the challenge thread for him. Great pics from the great northwest you will want to check out and give a try.


So check tomorrow for all new challenge pics and keep working on these and post them here as long as you want!!


Thanks again for everyone's participation.

BILL:wave: :clap: