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llis
07-30-2002, 10:04 PM
Tips or suggestions for a person just beginning to explore the wonderful world of photography.

Let's start with ......

1. What are some of the composition errors you see most beginners make?

geckonia
07-30-2002, 10:09 PM
Hey llis, great idea! I guess the biggest "mistake" I see people making is taking pictures from eye level, looking down at the subject. Especially when shooting flowers. I prefer to get down low and shoot from flower level and try to get some sky in the picture. The other more obvious thing is the "bulls-eye" where the subject is smack dab in the center.

SunnyJon
07-30-2002, 10:35 PM
The other more obvious thing is the "bulls-eye" where the subject is smack dab in the center.
I agree and I'll add cutting the pic in half-vertically, horizontally or diagonally.

Gateboy
07-30-2002, 11:31 PM
The ones mentioned are the most common, next up has to be...

1) Not shooting level! - Check your horizontals before shooting

Ok Ilis here's a example:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-Jul-2002/landscape_slant.jpg

Note the slanted horizon. It looks unprofessional and odd. Using the measure tool (under the eyedropper icon) click and draw a line tracing a line you know should be horizontal. Next select, Image > Rotate Canvas > Abituary. A angle with the proper rotation will be there, just click OK and the picture will be rotated to have a level horizon.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-Jul-2002/landscape_fixed.jpg

Ta Da!


(I think everyone knew I was going to say this ;) )

2) Shooting without a support at low shutter speeds. In general, don't try to hand hold below 1/60 sec.

Trimoon
07-31-2002, 12:11 AM
Besides getting in boats.. Lighting, shooting into the light is hard and makes for a undesirable or negative image

I do it all the time :D

MissMouse
07-31-2002, 12:13 AM
all of the above and I have to add animals and children to that shooting from above one.

Get down on their level......

meriadoc
07-31-2002, 01:03 AM
Ahh.. memories are flooding back from Photography class in high school all those years ago.. must go back to that photography teacher of mine and say hello...

Now, what were the errors that were picked up in my class on a frequent basis...

* not using the division of thirds.. ya know, divide the shot up into three both horizontally and vertically. don't centre the image (unless its really needed for the effect)

* wrong lighting.

* shutter speed too slow to be held (although she said that it had to be around the minumum shutter speed was 100 or something like that.. i've got pretty sturdy hands, but man, i won't go below 60 if i'm holding the camera (although at night, it can give some pretty nice effects if you're holding the camera)

* the appropriate area isn't in focus. (but then again, that was her appropriate area - not the students)

I think thats all i can think of.. if i think of anything else, i'll let ya know :)

-- meri (and to think i got top student in that class)

RAE99
07-31-2002, 01:24 AM
Biggest mistake = NOT FILLING THE FRAME WITH THE SUBJECT! (And not just beginners, we are all guilty at times.)

It seems so popular to stand back and get 75 acres of scenery and 300 miles of open sky and a tiny figure of Aunt Mable trying not to squint or scowl at the camera. (At those distances her scowling, squinting and wrinkles aren't visible so she should be happy with the results.)

;) ;) ;)

Ron

llis
07-31-2002, 05:03 AM
Examples.... Could y'all go back in from time to time and edit your posts to include image examples. You could even take some " not so wise" shots and tell why.

This is a great thread for beginners.

jsr88
07-31-2002, 10:01 AM
BUMP!!!
This thread is TOO important to let it slide into "oblivion". Lllis if you haven't done it already, (shame on me for writing before I check!) could you put this link in the sticky post dealing with tips? It would be much appreciated.

Thanks guys...great tips!

llis
07-31-2002, 12:45 PM
I agree.

Also, if we can get a community agreement, when important threads like this one come up, we could do a little house cleaning and just remove all the posts that have idle chatter like this post. That way when someone is really interested, they will not have to read all of our off topic stuff.

To be funny, we could make a "Funny Thread" to put all the posts that are gleaned and really confuse everyone. It would be like listening to a conversation and not knowing what the heck they were talking about. Oh, well, maybe that's not such a good idea, but I'd hate to just delete anyone's post.

Let me know your feelings.... and I'll sweep or maybe just lightly dust.

llis
06-30-2003, 06:41 PM
I'd love to do some more Do's and Don'ts.... and then get a great ranking on this thread so we can move it to the front page. :D

Crias
06-30-2003, 07:21 PM
One of my main continuing problems has been remembering to pay attention to the background and not just my main subject. No matter how good my subject looks if the background doesn't work then the shot doesn't either (usually).


Too busy of a background so that my main subject gets lost
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Jun-2003/2921-clutter.jpg


Poles/trees/posts coming out of an object (especially true for living things) This lucky guy not only has a pole out of his neck, but a stop sign on his nose.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Jun-2003/2921-pole.jpg


Chopping off feet- Unless one is specifically doing a head shot or upper body shot I don't like to see the whole body with just the feet chopped off.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Jun-2003/2921-feet.jpg


As others have mentioned- shooting from a standing position down on a subject.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Jun-2003/2921-above.jpg

devbrain
06-30-2003, 08:51 PM
1. Make sure it's focussed.
2. Make sure it's focussed.
3. Make sure it's focussed.

meriadoc
06-30-2003, 09:54 PM
1. exposure!!
2. focus
3. depth of field (especially important for landscapes!)
4. check the shutter speed :)

devbrain
06-30-2003, 10:38 PM
Forgot to mention ... make sure it's in focus.

jsr88
06-30-2003, 10:43 PM
DON'T SHAKE when you press the shutter release! (Oh...that falls under "Focus" doesn't it? (Sorry!) :D

Seriously...I'm here to RATE this THREAD so it finds its way to the "Phototography Hallway"

CARE TO JOIN ME???

Pam_R
07-01-2003, 01:10 AM
Don't even bother taking shots at high noon without some type of fill. Use either flash and/or a reflector. The contrast is just too great:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/01-Jul-2003/19209-High_noon.jpg


Don't forget to turn on that flash for fill when you're in a backlit situation:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/01-Jul-2003/19209-Fill_flash.jpg


With digital cameras, forgetting to properly set your white balance can result in a look you might not have planned for:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/01-Jul-2003/19209-White_balance.jpg


Always remember to check your flash's exposure compensation:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/01-Jul-2003/19209-Underexposed_flash.jpg


And, as has been mentioned, never cut off feet, or hands:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/01-Jul-2003/19209-Cut_off-_hands.jpg


I've been shooting digital for about 8 months now. The biggest lesson I've learned so far is to check all of the camera settings before every shoot. These cameras are so full of adjustable settings that it's easy to forget that you previously used a setting that might be completely inappropriate for your present shoot.


Pam

meriadoc
07-01-2003, 08:26 AM
Pam :

the high noon pic - I never normally try and shoot when there is alot of sun out anyway - contrast is just too great no matter where it is :)

cloudy days are (as far as i'm concerned) a photographer's paradise.. Natural reflectors!!

That is, unless you're looking for contrast!

Pam_R
07-01-2003, 10:51 AM
Meri, yes, cloudy days are a dream. I've taken a couple of wonderful shots inside my house using window light on cloudy bright days also...you don't have to leave home to take advantage of it!

Since you mentioned contrast...you're right, rules are made to be broken. If texture is what you're looking for, high noon might be the perfect time to shoot:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/01-Jul-2003/19209-Noon_rock.jpg

You just have to remember that your eyes can handle high contrast much better than your camera. So the gopher tortoise that looks fine to you might not look so good when you trip the shutter :)

Pam

Dave Carter
07-02-2003, 11:25 AM
My most often commited mistake...Not loading fresh batteries before every shoot and not having spares!!!!

Big mistake I have seen (even "pros" do it): Portrait on a beach at sunset with flash!!!:evil:

geckonia
07-02-2003, 12:00 PM
Dave... that is so funny...lol... I agree completely about the flash at sunset. :evil: Makes people look pasted into a postcard!

Cathy and Pam.... great examples! :clap:

Here'a a "do"
When looking at the LCD or through the viewfinder, try to look at the photo as a two dimensional thing. Consider the entire frame, to the edges and the corners. Think about what you're feeling about the subject, and compose, expose, and process to express those feelings.

Crias
07-02-2003, 01:59 PM
Thought of another one...don't get stuck in teh rut of always having your sublect (human or animal) always looking straight at you with a pasted on smile. Explore different angles and try for natural expressions.

tisri
07-06-2003, 08:55 AM
Another thing is check the edges of your subject against the background. Especially when shooting white things on cloudy days. <BR><BR>
For some reason it won't let me attach, but I took a shot a while back of a bald eagle, and you have to look VERY closely to see where the head ends and the clouds start.

photographer45
07-14-2003, 10:34 AM
Angles! Angles, angles, angles. When photographing people, most of us shoot the person face on. Turn that body! If you want it to really look like a nice portrait, tip one shoulder down (front for a woman, back for a man is a good place to start). Turn the face, tip the head. You want to create angles so the portrait has interest. Even if you're shooting a large group of people, turn them 1/4 toward the center. It's more slimming (which most of us appreciate :D), and just looks much nicer. I'll try to post an example of what I mean here today.

turri
08-09-2003, 11:25 AM
I always forget to take camera with me when I left the house. Then I got used to carrying it with me almost always and got some nice photos. My error was that I was not taking enough photos to learn.

SuzySue
08-20-2003, 03:47 PM
1. Read the manual to your camera
2. Take many many photos - It is digital ya know - don't need to save film
3. Most importantly is to HAVE FUN!!!!

meriadoc
08-28-2003, 10:34 AM
I got the following out of John Shaw's Nature Photography Field Guide :

Compositional Do's.
- Please yourself first, not someone else.
- Wander around to find the best subject.
- Handhold your camera to find the best composition, then set up your tripod.
- Preview the depth of field
- Check for background distractions.
- Check the edges of the frame for distracting brightly-lit hotspots.
- Check for merging tonalities and objects accidentally sticking into the frame.
- Control or enhance the light if needed.
- Be deliberate about camera placement and lens selection.
- Position your camera as the subject matter dictates, not as your knees or back want you to.
- Simplify, simplify, simplify.

Compositional Don'ts.
- Do not photograph the first subject you find, look for the best subject.
- Do not mount your camera on your tripod before you've found a good composition.
- Do not extend your tripod legs before you've found your subject and composition.
- Do not photograph contrasty subjects in bright sunlight.
- Do not bull's-eye your subject in the frame.
- Do not tilt horizons or place them running through the middle of the frame.
- Do not try to capture everything with one picture.
- Do not photograph low subjects from a high perspective.
- Do not let objects barely touch the center of the frame.
- Do not pick a flower (or harass and animal) to move it to a better spot.

-----------------
some of those have probably been done before, but are well worth repeating :)

-- Lisa

JanetteBC
09-05-2003, 02:10 AM
There is a mention of something I do a lot. Either getting a lot of gray or getting too much light in a digi shot. Please explain further. Thank You

MLFLY
09-11-2003, 08:38 PM
Light! You do have to get the technical side down pat but interesting light and proper exposure of that light will make the photo.

Mike

shuggi
09-12-2003, 03:06 PM
FILLING the shot with your intended image...and composing BEFORE you press the button.

"Sure Shot" cameras, with NO telescopic lense, are an amazing "learning tool". You only get what you "see"...and cropping is verbotten. It's a GREAT way to keep "in practice" (like putting ranges for golfers) since it FORCES one to concentrate...and aim for a hole in one.

I find that I get REAL sloppy with the digital...shoot, shoot, shoot...then crop, crop, crop...all this despite having a built in screen divided into thirds. I actually took consistently better pictures with NO telescopic and a camera that cost $100.

So I HIGHLY recommend going back to the simplest camera, even a "throw away"...and practice...prints are cheap these days...but the fact that each picture counts makes one concentrate just a little more! In fact, since one has to pay for prints, it FORCES one to look hard...and shoot straight.

SOMEWHERE in my files is an amazing High School photography course...IF (big if) I can locate it I will add it to this thread.

Final comment...ignore photoshop...ignore cropping. Apply all the other suggestions re how to shoot kids, or animals. PRACTICE on the simple camera. It allows no excuses!
Bon Chance/Good Luck

quadros
09-30-2003, 10:29 AM
Oooooooooooooooops!!!!!!!!!!!!
I have been guilty of ALL of these at some time or another!!!!!

pinkbubelz
10-13-2003, 11:41 AM
Great Thread!

And in regards to "cheap vs expensive" camera... I totally agree.

My hubby and I went to Yellowstone Nat'l Park recently. I gave him the Point & shoot and I had the SLR....Trying to teach him about composition and things so that he can learn to take pictures too.

What I did find is that sometimes, his landscape pictures looked better because of the simplicity of his camera-- Mine has so many things you can adjust that sometimes it over or undercompensates for the lighting....

I don't know if any of these have been mentioned, but:

make sure that you do have SOME sky when photographing a mountain or canyon--it just doens't do it justice when you have only a tiny strip of sky on the top of an otherwise beautiful picture.

Definitely, look for distractions in the background--It's terrible when you have a great picture with an exit sign in the background.

I like to shoot portraits at about twilight-- just about an hour before the sun goes down... However, I was guilty of doing the "flash" at sunset... (Very bad--and yes, it DOES look like the sunset is a backdrop!)

Also, if you have a reflective screen, make sure it isn't in the frame of the picture. This is especially important if taking a picture to show to your client-- even if it can be cropped out-- you need to make sure to visually inspect it before hand.

And, of course, make sure your strap, finger, hair, etc. is not in the corner of your lens or blocking your flash... :-)

Oh, and you can get really bad "red-eye" in some animals. Make sure the flash isn't going to make them look like something out of a horror movie.

If you're taking pictures at a wedding--try to get some candids--that way everyone doesn't have a cheesy smile pasted on--catching someone offguard can be really nice-- especially during an intimate moment a loving kiss, a first dance, etc. I also like to look for the shots that other photographers miss--pictures of the food or flowers, etc. :-)

DCJB
10-29-2003, 10:44 AM
Originally posted by shuggi
Final comment...ignore photoshop...ignore cropping.

I disagree. I'm a graphic designer that also does photography and I find that sometimes I look at a shot and realized that it would've looked better if I left out parts of the edges of the picture. Or, I realize that after the fact, a portion of the image would've looked better as opposed to the whole image. I rarely do that but I can't ignore the graphic artist part of me that can take advantage of that:) By the way, I'm new to this forum and think that the contributions in the photography section are invaluable and quite educated. I look forward to posting some photography here soon:)

DCJB
10-29-2003, 11:32 AM
I would add, as a good photography practice especially if you're using a digital camera, take several shots of the same subject from different angles. Even if you think you have a good shot, there might be a better one out there. I've been into photography for a year now. I got into it to support some of my graphic design needs but now I've gotten more serious about it; I've sold 2 photo sets so far. I find that if I sit down at my computer after taking a round of photos, I feel better about having multiple shots/angles of the subject. Usually, out of 4 or 5 similiar shots, I get one perspective I'm completely happy with (sometimes it's not the first shot I took). Sorry if this was already said, I'm at work and only had time to skim the other replies:)

photographer45
11-04-2003, 12:26 PM
Regarding portrait photography, here's my suggestion for shooting children: NEVER NEVER NEVER tell them to say 'cheese', or ...even worse...."SMILE!" It doesn't work. You get cheesy grins instead of nice, natural smiles.

Try instead having the kids say something off-the-wall, such as 'stinky feet', 'smelly socks', or 'boogers'. :D Works every time.

Mike Jordan
11-08-2003, 06:39 PM
Never get so wrapped up in rules and what you should do and shouldn't do that you miss the picture. It's better to have gotten the picture and know you could have done better than never have gotten the picture at all.


Once in a lifetime pictures only become once in a lifetime after they are taken.


Mike (who holds the record on missed once in a lifetime shots)

Michael
11-13-2003, 10:23 AM
One thing to remember, which I have not seen yet, is the picture must be pleasing to YOUR eye. Once you achieve this, then everything else begins to make sense. Keep taking pictures, get a feel for the type you enjoy, and get an idea of what looks good to you first. Once this happens the pictures start becomeing more professional looking, and all you read and try will start falling in place.

K-Tee
11-18-2003, 10:49 PM
first time in here, sure hope you keep this going you've put a lot of great tips and how to in here for a novice . thanks to each of you

cia
11-18-2003, 11:09 PM
thank you and more please!
c~

DCJB
11-25-2003, 09:40 AM
Don't be afraid to do whatever you have to in order to get the shot(within reason of course). For example, the ceilling and columns in the Lincoln Memorial here in DC looked really cool as the light came through the sky lights so I laid down on my back in the middle of tourist hell to get a few choice shots. I've done the same thing on a street corner in the middle of Rosslyn (small city outside of DC) at night. The Rosslyn photos didn't come out too well but I needed to take them and see. My point: as long as you're not putting yourself or others in harms way, do what you need to do to get the shot. Worry about all the stares and glances after the fact:)

cmg_oh
11-29-2003, 11:09 AM
Originally posted by DCJB
Don't be afraid to do whatever you have to in order to get the shot(within reason of course). .... Worry about all the stares and glances after the fact:)

Isn't that the truth! I was taking shots of the architechural details of the police department building locally and got real nervious when a few police officers came running out. Thankfully they turned to look at the beautiful building that they never took the time to notice before. Needless to say, I was too nervious to get too many good shots after that!

My tip? Look at ordinary things in new ways.

Gavyn
11-30-2003, 05:20 PM
Well, everyone has pretty much covered the most basic common errors.

However, don't get too wrapped up in the "don't center; rule of thirds" theory. Remember that absolutey NOTHING like this is an all-encompassing "rule". There are times when centering a subject is called for. There are times when every rule you see here and every common mistake listed above is actually a rule that should be broken or not a mistake at all.

I guess the difficult part can be that fine line between knowing when to abide by generally accepted standards and when it's appropriate to go off the beaten path. Years of experience have taught me, and it's pretty much second nature now. It's fun to go against the grain every now and then, and many great photos are produced as a result.

~G~

pinkbubelz
12-26-2003, 09:15 PM
One good thing-- My hubby, who has generally been "camera shy" (I'm the "photographer" in his mind) has come out of his shell since we got a digicam-- I'm teaching him to experiment and to look at his subject before taking pictures, etc...

In fact, sometimes you get happy accidents when you least expect it---when we were travelling this summer, he took a picture through a screen and didn't realize that the camera would have a hard time focusing because of it. However, that was one of the best pictures he took that day-- the screen made for a bit of an "impressionistic" shot... one he would never have envisioned otherwise!

(He's been having a lot of fun taking photos from off-beat angles--I am encouraging him to take more and to take risks when taking photos! He's really enjoyed it!)

--Iris

Jim Craig
12-27-2003, 12:15 AM
It's been a few years since I shot professionally and much of my work was news and sports, but:

---Most new photogs I worked with didn't take the time to really learn their camera and film. Turn off the automatic stuff and learn to make the photographs yourself. Don't be a slave to the camera.
---With digital, motordrive and all the technological developments there's a tendency to think that if you shoot enough pictures there's bound to be a good one. Even at two and a half frames a second you have to shoot each frame individually.
---Pretend sometimes you can only take one shot and it has to be the right one.
---Don't trust built in light meters to always "know" the correct exposure. You have to determine what portions of the scene should have certain values.
---Learn and use the zone system, even with digital cameras.
---Study the real pros, the men and women who really made photography. Study their photographs, their lives and techniques.
---Study, study study.
---Know your equipment so well its' use is second nature.
---Learn to see with a photographic eye. There are photographs all around you. Take images with your "mind's eye."
---Don't leave home without a camera. I even had a small Minox "spy camera" that went with me everywhere. It slipped into a pocket. There are dozens of miniature cameras today that you can almost carry on a keyring. There's no excuse for not having a camera with you anymore.

Just a few thoughts from an "old timer."

Jim

Jim Craig
12-27-2003, 12:16 AM
Oh, and while I'm thinking about it, don't neglect black and white. It has its' own magic.

Like the artists who usually work in a colored medium, then try pencil, it can open up new worlds.

Jim

pinkbubelz
12-27-2003, 03:52 AM
Yes, Black and White is an entire subject on it's own! However, it forces you to pay closer attention to detail than when you use color film... you have to watch the contrasts and light and values more when using black and white!

I agree--I find myself prefering to go to the manual settings at times, since the auto settings tend not to give me the desired depth-of-field, etc....

:-)

--Iris

laudesan
01-01-2004, 02:46 AM
Wow this is a greeeeeeeat thread I have read page one, and book marked to come back and read page 2..

I didn't go to photography school and I have a newish Canon Powershot A70 that I want to learn to use manually..

plnelson
01-26-2004, 10:49 AM
1. What are some of the composition errors you see most beginners make?

I don't think there IS any such thing as a "composition rule"!! I think worrying about "rules" produces photography that looks like it was designed by a committee.

I'm a painter and a photographer and I especially like studio photography. Lois Greenfield, who was one of my teachers, said that the difference between studio photography and other photography is that in most photography you take a photo, but in studio you make a photo. In other words, you control everyting - the pose, lighting, framing, timing, props, angle, etc.

The relevance to this question is that the only "rule" in good photography is that you get the result you intended. Sometimes extreme foreshortening or shooting into the light or a tilted horizon or motion blur or "over" or "under" exposure is exactly what's called for or what the artist wants.

The only "rule" is that the photographer know what he/she is trying to achieve before taking the photo and that he/she have enough technical understanding of their gear and of lighting, color, and exposure basics to achieve it.

TestShootCom
02-03-2004, 02:40 PM
In regards to working with models I would say:

Bad composition, don't just pick up a camera and take pix, try first to recreate something you like. An ancient proverb said: I read, I forget. I see, I learn. I do, I UNDERSTAND If you try to wing it you will never learn anything worthwhile until you understand the process. This is why assisting and some education is the best choice over pretending.

Bad props, so many guys get those tacky plastic roman column/pedestals.

Hands on hips, just bad news, having a model put both hands on one hip then facing her body on direction, tacky high school cheerleader pose...

Griping digital vs film. Hey to each his own.

Hips straight forward, when girls are broadside it looks really really bad.

FILLING DOORWAYS WITH ARMS UP. I hate when people put a model in a doorway or other opening and try to fill it by using her arms, this is just really stupid. The girls always look stretched, and contorted if she is not framed properly or cropped tight.
See this (http://www.musecube.com/TestShootCom/12947/index.htm?showimage=95457)

cadence57
03-22-2004, 09:51 AM
DO's
Bracketing the exposure is a wonderful thing! Over expose one stop, under expose one stop and take one that's dead-on perfectly exposed.

Meter for the right light for a particular photo - especially in landscapes (GUILTY of not doing that!) - and don't forget to bracket!!!

Unusual angles give new perspectives to ordinary things (rules are made to be broken sometimes!) -- experiment!

Cropping can take an ordinary photo and transform it into an extraordinary photo -- experiment!!

Non-SLR cameras - try to remember to compensate for the distance between the viewfinder and the actual lens!!!

HAVE FUN!!! :clap:

man from ironbark
06-17-2004, 02:50 AM
i just wasted a good hour on a post here but this blasted site wanted me to log in again, thus wasting my time and my post.. . Obviously my voice is unimportant.

TampaDan
06-17-2004, 11:37 AM
Just joined and read through this thread.
Best. Photography Tips. Ever. :clap:

Seriously, I participate at a number of photo sites and this thread is definitely one of the best I've ever read. I'm looking forward to checking out this site more often.

man from ironbark
06-17-2004, 10:09 PM
just remember that you have less than an hour to write and edit posts in .. after that it is stuck in eternity .. however it looks.

geckonia
06-30-2004, 12:39 PM
You can always click the ! icon, on the top right of you post, to "Report this post to a Moderator" and I can edit it for you if you like.

sheilsoft
07-07-2004, 07:11 AM
just remember that you have less than an hour to write and edit posts in .. after that it is stuck in eternity .. however it looks.

Sorry you had a problem with the 1 hour limit.

If you think you are going to spend a lot of time composing a long or complicated post, you could always use Word or Notepad to write your text, and then when you're happy with it, cut & paste it into WC system.

jbitzel
08-18-2004, 04:26 PM
I think there are alot of posers, for example that say use your manual settings when we know that we all get lazy, the important thing is knowing what situations automatic wont work in. Like the beach, the sky or high contrast scenes.

So I would say the biggest mistakes are, know your equipment, know your exposure, fill the frame, look for a better angle, and simplify the background.

By the way never take photos of airplanes and squirrels, they are too little!!!

James :clap: :clap:

yoyita_yoyita
08-19-2004, 10:14 AM
i just wasted a good hour on a post here but this blasted site wanted me to log in again, thus wasting my time and my post.. . Obviously my voice is unimportant.


Your system is not accepting cookies, that is why you are asked to log in. Mine did the same until I found McAfee had to be told what cookies to accept.

There is an sticky undel WC site discussions, that will guide you through.

Real Window Gallery
10-04-2004, 01:52 AM
Keep the Sun to your back and an eye on your pack!

bthphoto
12-21-2004, 10:20 AM
Can't disagree with anything listed above, but have to add this: I teach weekend classes for hobbyist photographers, and I've found there's a particular personality type who gets so hung up on "following the rules" that they forget about everything else. My rules for them:

1. Have fun or quit
2. Learn the rules and the resons behind them, but let them be guidelines, not constraints
3. Let your eye and your heart determine what's beautiful, not the rulebook
4. Don't be afraid to experiment.
5. Create an ugly, horrendous photo that follows all the rules and save it for a reminder.

katcocat
12-21-2004, 01:54 PM
1. Have fun or quit
2. Learn the rules and the resons behind them, but let them be guidelines, not constraints
3. Let your eye and your heart determine what's beautiful, not the rulebook
4. Don't be afraid to experiment.
5. Create an ugly, horrendous photo that follows all the rules and save it for a reminder.
Great advice, and welcome to the forum! :clap:
Kate.

skotkendricksr
02-01-2005, 04:43 PM
is there a reason to photograph something or someone ? yes , so that you
don't forget it or them and why it or they was there for! for your or our enjoyment

redea30591
02-07-2005, 02:24 AM
Examples.... Could y'all go back in from time to time and edit your posts to include image examples. You could even take some " not so wise" shots and tell why.

This is a great thread for beginners.

My primary regret is that I can't find a copy of the original picture I scanned in. I have the cropped picture, and can allways hunt for the original set of prints and re-scan them. (Not sure where it is, as its the first roll of film with my Cannon Rebel G camera).

http://www.mlcgroup.org/0ff1fc70.jpg

I attempted a really stupid shot, leaving the camera lense open for I think 30 seconds. Had the camera fairly stable with my elbow resting on my knee. Just about the moment the camera finally clicked to close the lense.... Something happened and my hand jumped big time.... I know, should have had the tripod setup. Probably wouldn't come out decent resting on my knee either, but what was interesting was I told to never throw away any pictures. You allways learn from your mistakes, and can often find uses for mistakes. The above picture was cropped to look like a panoramic picture. When cropped, it somewhat looked like a picture from a children's story book. The shaking of the camera that ruined the picture actually created a much more beautiful picture with a whole different outlook!

BTW, how does one have the picture show inside the message its self, and not as a link?

redea30591
02-07-2005, 02:26 AM
is there a reason to photograph something or someone ? yes , so that you
don't forget it or them and why it or they was there for! for your or our enjoyment


Let's not forget Evidence..... I took a photo of a couple of cop's sitting underneith a tree as Evidence of waist of taxpayer's money.....

man from ironbark
04-02-2005, 07:02 PM
!

BTW, how does one have the picture show inside the message its self, and not as a link?
Well you have to upload the image to wet canvas (http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/gman/index.php?cmd=upload_images) or attach it via the "Add post" page

Arglebargle
08-20-2005, 09:59 PM
I don't remember where I heard this, but this advice helps me a lot:

When looking through the viewfinder, ask yourself if this view is how you would paint your picture.

Miss J
09-04-2005, 07:35 PM
I think one of the biggest mistakes is framing the shot too tight - always step back and give plenty room around the subject so when you go to crop you have options.

RAE99
09-04-2005, 08:20 PM
I must concur, Jane Ann is right; framing too tight is a big mistake. That said, framing too "loose" is also a big mistake since you are wasting the pixels you purchased with your camera. That 8 megapixel camera you bought becomes a 6 or even 4 megapixel camera if you continually have to crop your photos to rid them of extraneous information at the top, bottom and sides of your "too wide" framing. The problem is even worse if you are using a 4 megapixel camera and continually cropping it down to a 2 megapixel frame.

My moral here is to try "hard" and LEARN to frame it correctly in the first place so you don't waste the precious pixels you bought and paid for and can use in a variety of large print sizes without sacrificing resolution, detail, etc.

However as a last comment on this, I will say if you MUST err when framing, then DO err on the side of "ever so slight" loose framing rather than too tight as Jane Ann pointed out.

;)

Ron

Miss J
09-04-2005, 09:36 PM
Well said Ron - I was thinking along the lines of print size as opposed to capture - especially with film shooters.....as a 35mm frame will not fit the standard print sizes and often causes alot of composition problems leading to expensive manipulation if one can't do the work themselves....

EyeSpy
10-25-2005, 01:39 PM
Note the slanted horizon. It looks unprofessional and odd. Using the measure tool (under the eyedropper icon) click and draw a line tracing a line you know should be horizontal. Next select, Image > Rotate Canvas > Abituary. A angle with the proper rotation will be there, just click OK and the picture will be rotated to have a level horizon.
Oh, my! Why didn't I learn this, like, three YEARS ago?? The single most useful info I've gotten this month! Thanks for the saved time!

DesertDarlene
06-26-2006, 08:12 PM
There's so many good quotes here that I would like to elaborate on.

Shooting without a support at low shutter speeds. In general, don't try to hand hold below 1/60 sec


I agree. I do a lot of low-light photography and a tripod is essential. I used to think tripods were expensive, but I found a perfect one at a low price at Amazon.com. It is light and fits into a regular-sized backpack. I carry it everywhere I take my camera, except when I have to load large amounts of food or water for a trek across the desert.


Oh, and while I'm thinking about it, don't neglect black and white. It has its' own magic.


I love black and white photos. They have their own challenges.

Non-SLR cameras - try to remember to compensate for the distance between the viewfinder and the actual lens!!!

That is so true! I have a non-SLR and an SLR and I often forget about the difference.

Keep the Sun to your back and an eye on your pack!

That's true for both, except when you are trying to shoot a picture with the sun, like a sunrise or sunset.

When looking through the viewfinder, ask yourself if this view is how you would paint your picture.

That's exactly how I think. In fact, many of my photos are used as reference for other artwork.

Admit it though, folks, we've all made the mistakes listed in this thread. ;)