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billycat
09-14-2008, 08:48 AM
I have a huge sail that was teared down during a storm a couple of years ago.
I was thinking of taking it to the recycling plant and get rid of it.
Suddenly I got the idea of recycling it myself and use it as an art canvas.

I think that I will stretch it and cover it with one or two layers of gesso.

Do you think my idea will work out?

OkeeKat
09-14-2008, 11:18 AM
DOn't see why not.. if its gesseod.. can't hurt to try it!

edtree
09-14-2008, 11:20 AM
:wave: I think it's worth a try, Billy! Hopefully someone will come along that knows the techie stuff about sail material to say for sure. I do like the idea of recycling different materials for art supports. I rescued some really old cloth covered notebook binders from the basement at work (that they were going to toss) to use for paintings. I hope the sail material works out. That should make a heck of a LOT of canvases!!!! :thumbsup: :D

Elizabeth

George Servais
09-14-2008, 01:24 PM
A few things to consider. Is it cotton canvas or synthetic? In the very olden days artists painted on wood but the problem was shrinkage, expansion, cracking and on and on. Artists being thrift oriented turned to something in great abundance at the time, sail canvas. More stable, more portable and cheap.
Some synthetic materials may not lend themselves to holding the paint. Be careful that the material has not been chemically waterproofed. If it is free of chemicals it may be O.K. to use.
Just make sure that the canvas is thoroughly washed and dried before use. Pollutants and acid rain leaved residues which will gradually degrade even the gesso primer.

Aires
09-14-2008, 02:43 PM
Gosh, it would surely be worth a try as you have nothing to lose but a little paint, gesso, and time. If the canvas is really clean and well gessoed, I wouldn't hesitate to try a small painting. After all, if it doesn't work it can still go to the recycle plant. My guess is that the preparation before hand will be the key.

:confused: I'd be less certain if you are planning on selling your paintings. Mostly because, unless you have access to some kind of chemical analysis, it will take so many years to know if there is something detrimental to long term survival.

deadsam
09-14-2008, 03:38 PM
maybe try this.
Get a small piece and put heat to it to see if it melts lol.
That should show if it's synthetic or not, and maybe give it a soak of laquer thinner (stinks like heck and is extremely flammable) but I used to useit to take paint off door hinges so I am sure it would take any waterproofing off then wash it in soap to get the thinner out and rinse well. lol
if ya don't want to go through all that headace then just do a burn test to see if it is real or memorex (sorry that stupid commercial never left my head from years ago lol) fake will melt usually or something like a melt and real canvas will burn like a cloth.
You should paint a sail boat since it's a sail lol.
Hope this helps somewhat

billycat
09-14-2008, 05:46 PM
Actually I suspect the stuff it is made polyester. The sail is about 30 years old, I wonder if any chemical water proofing survived the UV rays, salt and extreme heat. But it will be a good idea to soak it in some thinner or white spirit, at least it will clean it.

barsha
09-14-2008, 11:14 PM
I think it will work Billycat. I'm eagerly waiting to see that artwork on sail material. Never seen before. Folks at WetCanvas are so innovative. Oh great!

Magical_Realist
09-15-2008, 12:16 AM
Actually I suspect the stuff it is made polyester. The sail is about 30 years old, I wonder if any chemical water proofing survived the UV rays, salt and extreme heat. But it will be a good idea to soak it in some thinner or white spirit, at least it will clean it.I've painted on both polyester and nylon before. One good thing about them is that neither fabric requires priming.

The only concern I would have with painting on a 30-year-old sail is that while the salt and heat probably haven't hurt it, polyester eventually breaks down from UV exposure (but that said, it's still much more UV-resistant than nylon or natural fibers). If there are no rips or weak spots in the sail, I say go ahead and paint on it. It might not last forever, but it will more than likely survive your lifetime.