PDA

View Full Version : First attempt at watercolor background


Hiraeth
08-30-2008, 03:53 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Aug-2008/144882-heaven_and_earth.JPG

Opinions and/or suggestions for improvement welcomed!

TessDB
08-30-2008, 04:53 PM
Looks good to me, Kim! Especially for an early attempt! :thumbsup:

Considering how lousy I am at *any* wet media, I'll let the pros give you real pointers. I'll just be over here in the cheering section... :wave:

Rosemary

quills
08-31-2008, 06:47 AM
Looks good here as well Kim, really beautiful lettering a joy to see, background just a little strong, is it Acrylic or Gouache ? :wave:

Hiraeth
08-31-2008, 07:17 AM
I thought so, too. I was surprised at what happened when I applied the paint. I have watched videos that show the paint and water flowing, but my brush seemed to drag and I had to refill it when I expected to be able to sweep across.

I was going for color blocks and wanted primary colors, but I even though I wet the paper first, it seemed to soak up the water like sponge and there wasn't a 'film' of water on the paper like I expected. I don't know what kind of paper I have (bought it at a resellers in bulk for calligraphy) but it is thick and is definitely cold pressed and has a rough tooth.

The paint is Grumbacher watercolor gouache. Ink is Calli blue.

So. Do you think it was too much pigment or the wrong kind of paper or not enough water applied before the paint?

Looks good here as well Kim, really beautiful lettering a joy to see, background just a little strong, is it Acrylic or Gouache ? :wave:

InkyEss
08-31-2008, 12:09 PM
Kim, I love the bold background... could be because I adore vibrant colour.:) You have a slight uneveness of colour in the blue, but for a first attempt this is excellent, please don't give up as the more you use it the better you get, believe me.

Some papers, particularly Rough, do soak up an incredible amount of water. What you are looking for when doing wet-in-wet is a wet sheen to the paper before adding the colour... mind you it does depend on what end result you are aiming for... I kind of like colours bleeding into each other to give a soft effect.

If you want a block of separate colours (which is what I think you were aiming for) you can build up with a thin flat wash and when it's dry, do another thin flat wash over top, repeating until you get the kind of thing you are looking for.

Beautiful lettering!:clap:

Hiraeth
08-31-2008, 01:04 PM
Thanks for your feedback, Sharon! (Your's too, Rosemary and Neil--I forgot to thank you two!)

I'm thinking of trying this same project again; perhaps I will learn more from attempting it another way and seeing how things work out a second time rather than trying an entirely different project.

I did want a space between the two colors and I wanted primary colors, so in that respect, I am happy.

When you say a 'thin, flat' wash, what do you mean? By thin, I'm guessing you mean transparent, but does flat mean uniform?

I feel as though I don't have enough vocabulary to even know how to talk about watercolor! I guess I should go hang out in that section of WC for a while and "soak" it up!

Kim, I love the bold background... could be because I adore vibrant colour.:) You have a slight uneveness of colour in the blue, but for a first attempt this is excellent, please don't give up as the more you use it the better you get, believe me.

Some papers, particularly Rough, do soak up an incredible amount of water. What you are looking for when doing wet-in-wet is a wet sheen to the paper before adding the colour... mind you it does depend on what end result you are aiming for... I kind of like colours bleeding into each other to give a soft effect.

If you want a block of separate colours (which is what I think you were aiming for) you can build up with a thin flat wash and when it's dry, do another thin flat wash over top, repeating until you get the kind of thing you are looking for.

Beautiful lettering!:clap:

InkyEss
08-31-2008, 04:01 PM
Kim, yes flat means even uniform colour and by thin I mean one coat... to strengthen the colour allow it to dry and go over again.

I think the space between the colours works well too. :thumbsup:

Brilliant idea to try the same project again, that way you can compare your efforts. I often do that because it fixes the technique in my head... I take some time to remember things (age in my case, I expect! :D )

marie_d
08-31-2008, 04:35 PM
Hi Kim...lovely strong colour. Can't give any c&c re the watercolour technique only know a little about it myself, but what I can say is the lettering is beautiful. The more we can practise the better we will become at something. You have done well for a first attempt.:thumbsup:

Hiraeth
08-31-2008, 05:34 PM
Thank you, Marie!

Hi Kim...lovely strong colour. Can't give any c&c re the watercolour technique only know a little about it myself, but what I can say is the lettering is beautiful. The more we can practise the better we will become at something. You have done well for a first attempt.:thumbsup:

Hiraeth
08-31-2008, 05:36 PM
I think I'll do it again using the same paper, paint, preparation, etc. And then once I get some different paper, I'll try that, too!

Thanks for your encouragement!

Kim, yes flat means even uniform colour and by thin I mean one coat... to strengthen the colour allow it to dry and go over again.

I think the space between the colours works well too. :thumbsup:

Brilliant idea to try the same project again, that way you can compare your efforts. I often do that because it fixes the technique in my head... I take some time to remember things (age in my case, I expect! :D )

quills
09-01-2008, 10:20 AM
Follow Sharon's excellent advice and you will be soon doing exactly as you wish with paint,
Gouache dries to a lovely flat even colour.
You can use your Calli inks well diluted just pour the colour/s over pre-wetted paper and allow them to do there own thing.