PDA

View Full Version : Seascape (for want of a better title)


Marilyn Speck Ballard
08-26-2008, 07:20 AM
MY IMAGE(S):
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Critiques/upload_spool/08-26-2008/35425_DSC02418-1.JPG


GENERAL INFORMATION:
Title: Seascape (for want of a better title)
Year Created:
Medium: Oil
Surface: Board
Dimension: 36x48
Allow digital alterations?: Yes!

MY COMMENTS:
This piece was started in 1989<br>It's in a nice frame, but I think it needs something and a few corrections.

MY QUESTIONS FOR THE GROUP:
Please tell me what you think would help. (I submitted this a few days ago, but didn't get any responses and I couldn't find it on the postings)<br><br>Also, I requested the structured critique forum, but the "open" critique choice keeps popping up on the second page.<br><br>Thank you for your help.<br><br>Marilyn

Mikey
08-26-2008, 08:03 AM
This is a beautiful painting as it is. I'd love to see it eyes on to tell, because the file here is a little small to see the detail. Is that just horizon? Are those waves so high as to be close? I would consider softening the horizon and would justify that as there is cloud.

Marilyn Speck Ballard
08-26-2008, 01:04 PM
This is a beautiful painting as it is. I'd love to see it eyes on to tell, because the file here is a little small to see the detail. Is that just horizon? Are those waves so high as to be close? I would consider softening the horizon and would justify that as there is cloud.

Thanks, Mikey. I thought I had to keep the image under 100kbs. Then I noticed the painting of the eyes and how large it is. What is the size limit I can upload?
On the far right, it was intended to be distant mass of land, but it does look more like the ocean swell, doesn't it? I could put a tiny, soft, lighthouse on the far hill.
Yes, I agree I should soften the horizon.
Do you think I need any close-up birds, either on the rocks or something more detailed, on the beach, at the water's edge? (Sometimes, I just don't when to quit.)
:clap: Ok, it worked!!
I think maybe a very small boat to the far left of center, on the horizon, would be enough. (and do close-up birds another time?)

Any suggestions for a "great title"???

Thanks for writing.

Marilyn

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/26-Aug-2008/35425-DSC02418-2.JPG

Mikey
08-26-2008, 01:20 PM
I think you could put some ariel perspective into those waves to indicate distance. I wouldn't want a boat myself and think the gulls give the painting a much better composition. Added to that they give a good sense of something happening.

Marilyn Speck Ballard
08-26-2008, 02:39 PM
Thanks, Mickey, I'll try that to the waves. Far easier, too.

I'm always amazed at how much easier it is to critique something after it is posted on the web. Is that kin to looking through looking through a tube to concentrate on the subject without distractions?

More later.

Marilyn

tgsloth
08-26-2008, 02:52 PM
"Structured Critiques" is sometimes a little frustrating for posters as it has less traffic than open critiques, so, at times, you don't get feedback. And there seems to be a steady problem that folks try to post there and get bounced to open critiques. This is some issue with our site that I don't understand and I don't think has ever been explained by one of our administrators but anyhow, you're here now.

How about calling it "Tide Pool?"

I think it's a solid painting and have only one critical suggestion. Gulls don't flock in long drawn out progression although a bunch will gather around a food source. So I'm bothered that you've drawn tiny ones trailing off into the distance. I'd overpaint the little guys and just show a few of the closer ones.

Marilyn Speck Ballard
08-26-2008, 04:26 PM
"Structured Critiques" is sometimes a little frustrating for posters as it has less traffic than open critiques, so, at times, you don't get feedback. And there seems to be a steady problem that folks try to post there and get bounced to open critiques. This is some issue with our site that I don't understand and I don't think has ever been explained by one of our administrators but anyhow, you're here now.

How about calling it "Tide Pool?"

I think it's a solid painting and have only one critical suggestion. Gulls don't flock in long drawn out progression although a bunch will gather around a food source. So I'm bothered that you've drawn tiny ones trailing off into the distance. I'd overpaint the little guys and just show a few of the closer ones.


Thank you for the title suggestion, and also for the info about the gulls. You can tell I'm from the mid-west. ha. We do have lake gulls in Oklahoma, where my husband is from, and they sometimes are in large groups on the lakes, but I've not seem them arrive.
I love the sea (and birds) and wish I could visit more often.

Marilyn

Marilyn Speck Ballard
09-01-2008, 07:03 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/01-Sep-2008/35425-DSC02478.JPG

Shot out a few gulls, softened the horizon, added some higher splashes to the closer waves, and a lighthouse in the distance, and changed the title. What do you think??

Do you think it would sell? Do you remember seeing a survey asking the artists what rule of thumb they favored to use in pricing? When I see the big prices, I always wonder if they sell. (But I don't want to "give it away", either.

I appreciate your suggestions.

Marilyn

pinkpetunia
09-01-2008, 11:31 PM
I think it's beautiful and I think it would sell. Pricing is a very difficult thing. Another artist and I were discussing this and she said that she always considers how it will make her feel if the painting sell for a certain price. If she knows that she will feel heartbroken when it's sells, then the price is to low. I used to price mine by the inch and have since taken her words to heart. I sold a painting that I had used my old pricing methods on and felt sick when it sold and wish that I had charged more. Painting and selling is a very personal thing. You could go to a gallery and find something of equal skill level and see how they are pricing. That should give you some idea as to what you would expect.

tali
09-02-2008, 12:00 AM
This is looking wonderful! I'm fairly certain it will sell, as long as you don't price it too high. It's really looking beautiful. Title thoughts: Coming home, leaving home, freedom, beacon, journey, etc. It gives me a lost and found kind of feeling. As far as pricing, I think pink gave some good advice. I price by the square inch, mostly, my personal feelings for the painting will influence how closely I stick to my pricing. There are a few large paintings that I've priced too high for my skill level, but would feel like such a sell-out if I tried to sell them for less, I enjoy having them at home! Others I will discount heavily, either to get sales moving (nothing like the shot in the arm that a sale gives) or often because the buyer that it means the most to simply can't afford it, and I want them to have it. Often, my favorite paintings are given away (a friend of mine that helps me with marketing get's so mad when I do this, so I have to keep it very quiet as to not upset her--but I really love giving paintings away :) ). It all depends on how badly you want to sell it vs what it means to you. If it helps, I have a page on my site explaining my pricing, and I've started tentatively posting prices on my blog too. On the blog, you can click on the "solds" to see what they sold for. Perhaps it will give you some ideas.

tgsloth
09-02-2008, 07:29 AM
I'm going to add some more comments about pricing. A key variable is how many paintings are you generating (and will generate). If you just make a painting here and there you can either price it high and sometimes you get lucky or price it low and enjoy knowing you sold something. If, on the other hand, you have a steady output, you need a pricing strategy that will allow you to build sales momentum. This means low pricing because you have no reputation and your paintings are in an improving phase. Someone will refer to you as an "emerging" artist. An annoying label, but there it is.

The biggest risk, and I personally know a bunch of part time artists who fall into this trap, is that you insist on a high price and make one sale or no sales and feel unappreciated and frustrated and get into a gallery and then get your painting returned etc etc. And this can make you stop painting unless you have an eternally expanding garage.

When you develop some selling momentum, you can steadily raise prices and galleries will cooperate with you on this. Resist the feeling that you let a painting go for too little. Paint another. That's what you do as an artist. Someone was willing to pay to put your creation in their home or office. That's addictive. And you'll begin to develop a reputation and get some commissions and it's all good.

tali
09-02-2008, 03:48 PM
well spoken Bob, as always!

Mikey
09-02-2008, 03:55 PM
Yes beautiful and I can now easily see that is distant land.

ryster007
09-02-2008, 05:15 PM
Congratulations on the alterations they improve this work

I agree that this is sell-able

Bobs comments are wise words indeed. You have already proved that you can produce this quality- sell it and paint another, when that sells paint another and then think about upping prices. Better to have your art out there being appreciated than collecting dust.
I remember selling one thinking 'this is the best I can do' and wanting the earth for it, when I eventually gave it away as a gift, I was a little gutted to let it go. But then someone saw it in their friends house and commisioned one that I sold for double the price!! (the commission was miles better as I'd developed then too!)

Ryan

Marilyn Speck Ballard
09-03-2008, 12:09 AM
Pink Petunia, Talya, Bob, Mikey, and Ryster, thank you all so much for your comments and suggestions. I was really excited to read all of your replies.
I'm thinking I might have much better luck with prices at some of the galleries, but I do have an opportunity to exhibit all I want to and for free at a neighboring small town fall festival coming up in a couple weeks. (here in the ST. Louis area and West, all small towns run together) I have enough paintings, hand-built pottery, and various other hand crafted items, to make a good showing. Pricing anything like that is still hard for me. I've been down on the farm too long. I will go and visit some of our local galleries, but I really don't see much art work like mine. Most is more modern and impressionistic.

Thanks for your encouragement and advice. I will try!!

Marilyn