PDA

View Full Version : Advice for giving a pastel class?


Colorix
08-21-2008, 03:59 PM
Been talked into giving a pastel class this autumn. I'm looking forward to it, but am also feeling rather overwhelmed. It will be 10 Wednesday evenings (a normal class over here).

I'm looking for advice on

a) how to handle people... What do people expect from a class? Serious "lecture and laboratory", with historical references, research, and footnotes, so to speak, or do they simply want a nice evening chatting and painting, just waiting for the teacher (me :eek: ) to please shut up? Or does one get two groups in one? The serious learners, and the sociable people?

b) Curriculum. Do you know of any online resources, or have one you'd want to share? Is it better to have something new every time, so they get to try as many different things as they can, or is it better to devote a couple of lessons to one thing and go into it in more depth?

c) Subjects. Do people want to paint still-lifes/portraits/flowers/landscapes only, and do they object to being dragged out of their comfort zone? Or will they get happy if I set them a task every lesson?

d) Critique. I was thinking I'd walk around the room, saying encouraging things and giving helpful hints. Do people 'die' of embarassment? Is it better to only give encouragement and praise? (I've been to both types, and I vastly prefer getting helpful hints and advice.)

e) Any advice in any area you can give me on things I've not even thought of?

Thank you,
Charlie

Sonni
08-21-2008, 05:39 PM
Charlie, I've done a couple of workshops for beginners in the past. What I learned was that most beginners lack knowledge of composition and value. They want to jump right into color. My best 2 cents? :D Refine this notan business in your mind and on paper so you can get them on the right track. Demonstrate examples--artists and wannabes are visual. Give honest critiques, not pablum, but preface them with something encouraging. Most people will not charge ahead with experimentation like you or I will, they tend to be hesitant, resistant to change, and want stay in their comfort zones. Good luck:)

Deborah Secor
08-21-2008, 05:56 PM
Great, Charlie! :thumbsup: You'll be a natural teacher, of course. I'll tell you my way, but there are lots of ways to do this and you'll find your own personal way to do it, I'm sure.

a) Some of my most serious students come to class for far more than just social reasons, but they enjoy spending time together with others who are interested in art. My method is to encourage a little of both. We meet a half-hour before class begins to set up and socialize. I have a coffee pot and my students bring brown bag lunches over, sit around the table and chat, and someone invariably brings cookies or fruit to share. By gathering this way I can begin promptly at the class time.

b) I do 8 once-per-week classes, three hours long. The first 60-90 minutes is lecture/demo time, and the remainder of the time is painting at the easel under my supervision. I give them a schedule and explain what to expect and what to bring.

c) My best selling class is Painting the Landscape in Pastels. It's a beginning/intermediate class, and we paint from photographs. I cover a different topic in the landscape each week, such as how to paint mountains, trees, the sky and clouds, still or moving water, rocks, snow, shadows, etc. However, I also do a class that's called Pastel Techniques and is open to any subject matter. We do more experimentation. I know another gal who teaches a class devoted to exploring different pastels, paper, underpainting techniques, etc. and it's a popular introductory class, too.

d) I set aside one full three-hour class at the end of each session for a formal critique. We have a lot of fun, though, by having a potluck brunch! That sets a tone that's a little lighter and not quite so scary for newbies. Everyone brings a dish to share, and we sit and talk and eat. Then each one takes a turn putting up all the paintings they've been working on for the 8weeks. I do a critique of the entirety of what I see, helping them find their strengths first (color, composition, contrast, value--whatever), and then we find the "point of friction", the place where they need to let out the clutch, so to speak, and try to move forward. I try to make some kind of specific recommendation like doing 10 twenty-minute paintings or suggesting they look for photos with better darks, or add some colors to the palette (and when I know them well I sometimes remove a color and ban them from using it for 8 weeks! Works wonders sometimes. :wink2:) I invite the whole class to compliment a painting I think is strong by asking a leading question like, "Don't you all think this has great color?" I don't hesitate to make specific suggestions about how to improve work, but it's often done the way we do it here in the Pastel Forum, as a suggestion for the next painting, if not this specific one...that way they don't get hurt feelings. I think if you keep a professional but relaxed atmosphere where you're encouraging people to seriously think about improving, it works really well.

I could go on...but that's my way in a nutshell.

Deborah

PeggyB
08-21-2008, 09:42 PM
As Deborah has already said, there are many different ways to approach a class. I think her ideas are great for day time painters. I've used all of the same ideas she's already presented, although Sonni's "notan" suggestion is a good one too. First of all, do you know how much experience most of the students already have with pastels? That makes a big difference in how I conduct the class. Even experienced "other medium" painters appreciate an introduction to pastel class.

Another important question for me at least is how many of those evening students hold down a day job? I've taught many evening classes, and almost always it is hard for day folks to concentrate on long lectures or demonstrations in a 3 hour class. They are usually the ones who say I talked or demonstrated too much when it came time to hand in their class/teacher critique! The same routine during the day gets totally different critiques from the students, and some of them even suggest more demo time if I've taken "only" an hour! You might want to take a vote of the students to get an idea of what they'd prefer. If it is divided, let them know some weeks will have a longer lecture/demo, and some weeks will have more student painting time. In my experience, night students rarely have time to paint other than during class and tend to be less social, more serious. Day time students like to talk and even take time out for coffee and treats occassionally. Since this is at an art center, the time devoted to the class is strictly limited to the 3 hours because another instructor comes in a half hour after we finish. Therefore, I try to discourage "treat time" to that time during which I'm demonstrating. I don't need the treats! LOL

Almost always my students want honest, gentle critiques of their work. I invite everyone to participate by first saying what they like about the work, and then if they have a question or suggestion they will make it. Anyone who doesn't want to participate isn't made to feel they have to. It isn't something everyone is comfortable doing. More accomplished painters expect a hard critique. I begin my classes by asking new students how much art experience they have, and how much of it is in pastels. I do this privately so as not have anyone feel uncomfortable.

One of my most popular intro classes is exploring different techniques for about 4 weeks, and then letting the students choose which one they want to continue with for the next 4 to 6 weeks (depending upon how many weeks have been scheduled by the art center that quarter). My continuing students enjoy participating sometimes too as they want a new challenge. Otherwise, continuing students work independently using their own photos or the still life I always have provided. Since we can't leave the still life there until the next week, it is always a very simple one or they take a photo and finish at home. Landscapes are my students favorites too, and learning how to use the photo instead of letting the photo use them is a good challenge that can be resolved using the notans among other methods...

I weave art history and history of pastels into daily talks, but don't make a full lecture of it at any time.

I hope you get lots of ideas here, and have a great time teaching. You'll be a natural at it.

Peggy

nvcricket
08-21-2008, 10:33 PM
Hi Charlie,

Boy do I want to be one of your students! I took several years college classes to become a teacher, and lesson plans are essential. Set a goal for each class and create objectives and follow up with lesson plans to achieve that goal....
sample objectives:
TSWBAT (the student will be able to) develop their own color wheel.

TSWBAT: demonstrate the concept of temperature in their painting.

I also found some great threads that have touched this before.

http://wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=411493&highlight=teaching+pastel+class

http://wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=454706&highlight=teaching+pastel+class

Carol

Donna T
08-22-2008, 10:25 AM
Good luck with the class, Charlie! I can't wait to hear how it all goes. I've never taught (unless you count my substitute teaching to elementary school kids) but my first thought was that some people may not know the basics of drawing, like Sonni mentioned, yet they'll want to jump in and get dusty. I would really like to know how to handle this in case I ever get the opportunity to teach a basic pastel class. I would not want people to get discouraged with pastels when really the problem is that they don't have a clue about the basic fundamental concepts of art.

Donna

Studio-1-F
08-22-2008, 11:04 AM
. . . a) how to handle people... What do people expect from a class?
I have never taught an art workshop/class (that's fer durn sure!) but I have taken many more than my fair share. I have a few suggestions, these from the pupil point of view:

-- What do people expect from a class? Ask them! In the first hour of a weekend workshop or the first session of a multi-session class, ask the folks to take turns telling a little bit about themselves and, more importantly, what they expect to get out of your class. If there is a huge crowd, maybe ask that they just do the second, tell you their expectations. But don't just sit politely and listen. Take notes and then actually adjust your curriculum to accommodate your students' expectations, as much as you can or as much as is practical. Don't adhere to some rigid pre-determined plan if that's not going to mesh with your students' needs and wants.

-- Who are you? Take a moment and introduce yourself. Who you are, what are your reasons for teaching, your qualifications and credentials. This is not boasting, it's looking them in the eye and reassuring your students (regardless of your fame or what your website says about your myriad accomplishments) that yes indeed, you really do know what you are talking about.

I am sure your class will be wonderful! Be sure to report back! Not many people are lucky enough to be natural-born teachers (and I almost sure that it's a "skill" that can NOT be taught), but if you find you are one, you'll revel in the experience!

Jan

Adriana Meiss
08-22-2008, 12:12 PM
What a wonderful chance you have! I'm green with envy!
I'm assuming it'll be about 10 hours at least, no grading, mostly for adults. All the many things you can do!

Let me tell you first about my first pastel class: it was horrible! It's a miracle I'm still working in pastels! The person who taught it had "tried" pastel before, he actually showed us a nice painting he did. After the minimum of information about the medium, he let us work from photographs. From the work done by most students I saw a complete lack in understanding about composition.
So I'm with Sonni and Donna on this, students need the basics of composition, and perspective too.

I think most beginners need structured classes, at least at the beginning.
In teaching a foreign language I've learned that most students appreciate honest feedback, but it is always good for their morale to point out something good before mentioning areas where they need improvement.

Something I learned from an instructor, that made the most difference to me, was to read about other artists, whether they are contemporary or not. This opened a new world to me.

Jan mentioned important things: if you want to have good dynamics in your classroom, encourage people to get to know each other. This makes it easier when it comes time for them to give some critique.

I'll be checking this post because my goal is to eventually teach a pastel class in my area.

There is no doubt in my mind that you'll be a great teacher!

pastellady
08-22-2008, 12:21 PM
Charlie-thought I'd jump in and offer a beginning idea that my students love. It is a class starting out with a discussion of surfaces and pastel manufacturers and also some hands on painting with these by the students. When I first started it was a guessing game and trial and error ,so that they would have a jump start I offer this as part of my classes. they really enjoy getting the chance to jump start this exploration. Dakota Pastel has sampler packets of both and you can divide the papers up and just let them use the pastels. One class did a whole plein air painting just using the pastels that came in the green set sampler box. Very creative and wonderful paintings evolved.

DonnaT-Start them off with a simple form and have them only put in the values of color to represent the form-no lines-yes, you can actually paint an orange, apple, lemon or my students favorite-eggplant with no lines. This also gets them thinking on the creative side of the brain a little faster.

just a few ideas that have worked for my students.

Colorix
08-22-2008, 01:58 PM
Oh, such wonderful informative replies from both sides of it! Thank you so much!

I've taken quite a number of classes, so I'm pretty sure about what I should *not* do... :-) Tricky part is to make things simple and interesting. (Complicated and yawn-inspiring is easy! I'd just have to pretend I'm lecturing at university level! LOL...)

A few of those who have *said* they will enroll have experience in watercolour, and one is painting in oils. The class will be adults only, and most of them will be working people, painting as a hobby. As I put up my advert, I hope people I do not know will join. I can expect only two or three people to even have tried pastels before.

It will be 10 x 2,5 hours, with a 15 minute pause. (Coffee if we're lucky to have access to the pentry.)

One thing I'm struggling with is that I feel like an 8 year old teaching 7 year olds. I've only painted in pastel for a year, and the Pastel Forum has been (and is!) my academy. The WetCanvas Academy for Fine Artists! Taught by Masters of Pastel.

Let me digest your input, and I'll come back with comments, and more questions. I'm very grateful for it all, and the links to older posts are very good!

Thank you,
Charlie

Tressa
08-23-2008, 10:39 AM
Charlie, great advice already, and just to add my two cents. Starting a class with new people is unnerving. What I do is similar to someone else's idea. I bring is small samples of different paper and pastels, talk about the medium, get feedback on expectations, experience, do a very quick demo, then let students try out a simple painting, like suggested, a pear, apple, etc...thus giving you an idea of what they know, and how to proceed.

As to crits, I use the positive,crit, positive technique.
Say something along the lines of....You did a great job on "blank"; I would like to see you.. "do more, try this, add that";then, you're doing very well with "blank"....
I usually keep the lecture down to a minimum on evening classes as Peggy says, as this is the only time some people have to paint. Sometimes is good to plan to do only a small amount each class, or set aside two classes for lecture, maybe. Have structure in place, and then be willing to change the criteria based on your students' desires, and abilities.
And you will be fine, you have a wonderful sense of humor, and willing to share your talent.
Tressa

Deborah Secor
08-23-2008, 11:03 AM
One more bit of advice, pertinent to the evening classes--make sure you have EXCELLENT lighting, especially of your demonstration easel and palette, but also the general room light. I know how challenging that can be, but I've even had my students bring clamp-on lamps and extension cords and I've supplied a breaker box with multiple outlets so that each one could work in enough light. At night it's just so hard to achieve the right colors, so when possible I've held a critique on a different day, during daytime hours, in order to be able to analyze things in the daylight! Again, not always possible, I know... Personally, I don't teach any evening classes any more because you just can't get correct color, but I have that luxury now and I've taught my share of them.

Deborah

PeggyB
08-23-2008, 01:16 PM
One more bit of advice, pertinent to the evening classes--make sure you have EXCELLENT lighting, especially of your demonstration easel and palette, but also the general room light. I know how challenging that can be, but I've even had my students bring clamp-on lamps and extension cords and I've supplied a breaker box with multiple outlets so that each one could work in enough light. At night it's just so hard to achieve the right colors, so when possible I've held a critique on a different day, during daytime hours, in order to be able to analyze things in the daylight! Again, not always possible, I know... Personally, I don't teach any evening classes any more because you just can't get correct color, but I have that luxury now and I've taught my share of them.

Deborah

Good advise here, and something I've never had to even consider. I've been fortunate to have taught night classes only in extremely well lighted buildings. One even has color corrected lights in one area, and only cool florescent in the others. Another has a skylight that presents major problems during daytime if we are working on a still life. Outside of your own studio, lighting may always a problem :(

As others have already stated, the intro class that includes different papers and pastel brands is always a hit with my students too. However, I start with one or two lessons on a less expensive paper, and student grade pastels for as you know sticker shock is pretty steep with pastels when first beginning. :) I supply anyone who has no pastels or few pastels with a 24 stick box of Faber Castel Goldfaber pastels and Canson paper. (the art center reimburses me for these supplies.) Then I introduce them to the various paper options, and bring my boxes and boxes of "extra" pastel pieces in the various brands for them to try. They quickly determine what brands of pastels they want to buy or buy more of, and which papers they prefer to use. Sometimes they want to buy the Dakota sampler packet of papers or pastels and I encourage that too, but that's not an option for you in Sweden. Continuing students bring all thier own supplies and paper, but are welcome to dip into my "extra pieces" boxes when needed. I have three plastic containers filled with rice, and the pastels in each are roughly sorted by light, medium, and dark values.

Peggy

Tressa
08-23-2008, 02:06 PM
Hmm..lighting could be an issue. I teach in the Art dpt at the college and we have extremely good lighting, never thought of that.
Main thing Charlie, is plan, don't stress, and have fun.
Tressa

Colorix
08-23-2008, 04:27 PM
Thank you, so much!

Light: I think there is decent enough light to read by in the room I now know I will get the use of, and I plan to bring two halogen lights (300 W, and 150 W) for still-life set-ups, demos, and general reflected light. (Have an additional 300 W lamp.) It has to be light enough to see clearly, but not too bright so the paintings become too dark.

I've painted in classrooms designed for painting-classes where nobody thought about the light... =:-o Either too dark, or lamps distributed evenly all over the ceiling and the 'vast' choice of all on, or all off.

Pastels: What do you guys think of this?: There are cheapies, naturally, and then there are Rembrandt, Schmincke, Sennelier, and W&N to be bought in Stockholm.
As I want them to have a warmer and a cooler version of the three primaries, and one of each of the secondaries, plus enough of a value range, and white plus two earts, I've selected 30 sticks from Rembrandt open stock, for the bare minimum, just to get started.
I've asked the shop that sells Rembrandt to give my students a good deal, but have not gotten a reply yet.
I'm figuring this distribution of colours and values will suffice, as I plan on teaching them to layer/scumble/glaze. And, there will be still-lifes at the start, so they learn first to paint and see from life. It is the colours I started with, and it'll make it interesting for them to learn their colour-wheels. ;-)

Cheapies is a good idea, only, I'm sooo frustrated with them.

Ready-made small sets: They usually have a lot of XXX,5 value, and often too many almost identical yellows...

Themes: What do you say about 15-20 minutes of 'lecture' at the start of each evening? I'd go through one or two principles, and let them practice it, incorporate it in their mental toolbox.

I thought I'd plan themes for each time, but to plan the amount of info once I've met them and know where they stand.

Plonking down an apple (or some such) in front of them the first time and ask them to draw it sounds like a very easy and quick way to determine where they are. I could see their level by just one glance.

Jan, to ask them what they want/expect, and to tell about myself is very good advice! I would have forgotten to tell about myself, as I generally am a tad uncomfortable doing so. I'd rather focus on the topic, or on them. Clearly, it is smart to establish some trust right at the beginning. Thanks a lot, Jan!

All this is whirling and boiling in my mind! I'm glad it is doing so now, a month in advance, and not in the last minute. (I'm no stranger to last minute ad hoc fixes...)

Thank you, I'm thinking on, gestating thoughts.

Charlie

*Marina*
08-23-2008, 05:12 PM
Something to think about Charlie and I know it is completely different from all the good advice you got here but might make you think. I take lessons regularly. During our classes everybody paints their own thing from their own resources being either a still life or a photo of still life or landscape. The teacher helps everybody individually at the level they are and tackles problems when they arise. No lectures before hand but during painting each individually when they come up. This way you have most chances you keep your "students" interested in what they are doing. Everybody has their own ideas and tastes. I have been used to this formula for a few years now and all other participants are just as enthousiastic as I am with this way of working and everybody is happy with their paintings and keep coming back.
As far as lighting is concerned it is very important. I have had day and evening classes in the same week. It took me a while to realize that it does not work working on the same painting. I would correct in the evening things which I had done during the daytime session and then correct it back during the day sessions.
Just some thoughts. Anyway I wish you good luck and a lot of pleasure with your classes.

PeggyB
08-23-2008, 05:34 PM
Marina's idea is pretty much how I conduct my classes with a slight "twist" - newcomers get a planned course outline, and while I'm discussing what they will be doing that day, the continuing students are working on their individual projects. Once the beginners beging the day's lesson, I go to each of the other students and discuss whatever their project and progress is that day. My students get very individual attention designed to give them what they most need (not always what they most want though as sometimes continuing students need a "kick" in another direction - I've been told by all of them that in the end they appreciate the "kick" even if initially it makes them a bit uncomfortale. Of course this is always done in a positive manner, and no one is ever embarrassed by it.) I have an ever growing loyal group of students.

Charlie the Rembrandt idea will work great for anyone not having any pastels. For ease of learning to see value and temperature, Rembrandt still has one of the easiest numbering systems out there.

I "plonk" down a pear for the first lesson. I have a collection of very life like looking pears so there is never a problem with spoilage. I also have several varities of apples, but prefer the pear first because unlike most apples the pears are seldom symmetrical so the students don't even try to get both sides looking the same. Also, the colors of a pear are easier to come by in a limited set of pastels.

Peggy

Deborah Secor
08-23-2008, 07:02 PM
Let me ask a question of you other teachers, if Charlie doesn't mind me horning in here.

I have an idea to offer a 'clinic' class, kind of like what you describe. No lecture or demo, no planned class, just an open studio where students can bring work for individual critique and assistance/instruction. Independent Study of a sort.

How do you sell the class? I have to rent the room, so my costs have to be covered, thus I'm unwilling to sit in a room and see if anyone comes. I usually pre-sell a session of classes, and wonder how you offer such clinic style class. Do you sell a block of classes (say, 4 of a certain price)? Or do you use another system? Also, do you accept all kinds of media or stick with pastel only (I have little to no experience with other media personally, so there's only so much I could offer!)

Just curious!

Thanks--
Deborah

PeggyB
08-23-2008, 08:29 PM
Let me ask a question of you other teachers, if Charlie doesn't mind me horning in here.

I have an idea to offer a 'clinic' class, kind of like what you describe. No lecture or demo, no planned class, just an open studio where students can bring work for individual critique and assistance/instruction. Independent Study of a sort.

How do you sell the class? I have to rent the room, so my costs have to be covered, thus I'm unwilling to sit in a room and see if anyone comes. I usually pre-sell a session of classes, and wonder how you offer such clinic style class. Do you sell a block of classes (say, 4 of a certain price)? Or do you use another system? Also, do you accept all kinds of media or stick with pastel only (I have little to no experience with other media personally, so there's only so much I could offer!)

Just curious!

Thanks--
Deborah

Deborah several years ago I did something similar to what you are suggesting, and it was very successful. However, I took it a slightly different route in that rather than rent a space I had a student with enough room at her home for 6 - 8 "students of pastel experience". I gave her lesson for half price so I guess in a sense I was "paying" for the room, but far less than any other place, and she was happy not to travel for classes. Everyone paid by the 4 week session, and so long as there were 4 people (including the home owner) I was willing to give the class. I think it was about two years worth of classes for these same people. However, all of them were experienced painters to one degree or another in the beginning, and after two years didn't feel they needed a weekly class. My hostess moved, and I didn't feel like finding another venue as that was about the time I was getting burned out on teaching anyway. I had two other weekly night class in an art store that continued for almost two more years before I said enough for now!

I didn't need any specific marketing plan for this class. The initial 4 students were ladies who'd been students in the art store night class, and wanted a day class closer to home. Most days I had 6 students, but it could fluxuate to 8 or drop to 4 on ocassion. Why don't you ask some of your more experienced students if they'd like to try this? Ask them if they know anyone who is experienced in another medium that might want to try pastels (I got 3 watercolorists that way into pastels). It is a lot easier for the teacher to "just instruct and critique" without demonstrating or hauling all your own supplies to class.

Peggy

Studio-1-F
08-23-2008, 08:56 PM
How do you sell the class? I have to rent the room, so my costs have to be covered, thus I'm unwilling to sit in a room and see if anyone comes. I usually pre-sell a session of classes, and wonder how you offer such clinic style class. Do you sell a block of classes (say, 4 of a certain price)? Or do you use another system? Also, do you accept all kinds of media or stick with pastel only (I have little to no experience with other media personally, so there's only so much I could offer!)
This could be a good idea, if you have a local following that will sign up. You could "sell" it just as you pre-sell a regular class, just call it an Open Studio or a Critique Studio, or some such. Yes, sell a block. Maybe you are "open" for six weeks but the pre-sold block is for 4 sessions, so folks have some flexibility on which days they show up.

You might want to limit to just those with experience, so you don't end up being monopolized by some rank beginner who needs extensive hand-holding and a more structured class.

What I always very much enjoyed were the show+tell sessions at the end of the day, where you showed what you were most pleased with and your fellow students could ask questions about the decisions you made, color choices, composition, etc. I L-O-V-E seeing others' work and I always learn quite a bit from the show+tell session. If this happens quietly, one-on-one, as the instructor moves around the room, I somehow feel gyped. But maybe that's just me.

. . . .I would have forgotten to tell about myself, as I generally am a tad uncomfortable doing so. I'd rather focus on the topic, or on them.
Fine, do that! But first establish your own bonafides. Your expertise, your experience, your credentials. Tell me why me paying you to teach me is going to be worthwhile to me. If it were me, I'd be uncomfortable if my students were sitting there wondering just who I was.

Jan

Tressa
08-24-2008, 01:50 PM
We have a 3 hour class on Wednesdays that is called "Open Studio" This is open to all media and is discouraged to beginners. However it is a very popular class, and actually Deborah, it is not hard to be "mentor" in this class as you have the ability to help with comp color value,etc...no matter the medium. I was in charge of this class for quite some time, and even though I have never been too fond of acrylics, and was just beginning in pastel, I could still "help" solve issues that arose. So if you wanted to venture into other mediums you should have no fear, and you maybe would make some converts.:D

*Marina*
08-24-2008, 02:22 PM
Actually my classes are all media classes. People do oils, acrylics, pastels and charcoal. They are advertised as drawing and painting lessons. I started 5 years ago with just charcoal, learning to draw from life (charcoal is an excellent medium to learn values by the way). From there on I moved to pastels (was the first one in the group and my teacher was not very enthousiastic as he did not know a lot about pastels (now there are 4 in the group). Last year I started with oils as well. The principles of painting apply to all media. All media classes do have advantages as you get to see many different techniques.

Deborah Secor
08-24-2008, 04:52 PM
Thanks for the thoughts and ideas.

I wouldn't want to set up a class that would simply draw off the students I already have. I've had that happen before. I hold one class and get 16-20 students. I hold a second class and get 8 for each one, plus then I have the headache of the ones who say, "I can't make it to this class. Can I make it up at the other one?" It's a bookkeeping nightmare! I drive twice as far, twice as often, and make less money doing it. Not good.

I'm looking for a way to expand things more, attracting others. I want to start with a once per month clinic/critique class, and hold it on Saturdays for the students who cannot join me on weekdays. Finding the venue for that is a bit challenging. Most churches (I've rented classrooms in various churches for twenty years) don't want you there on Saturday, and most art studios are maxed that day. I've done the student's home route, too, Peggy. We held classes in Janie Hutchinson's house for about a year--nice place to work, too! (You might remember she was the original publisher of PJ.) I guess if this is supposed to come together, it will, in time. I might start by holding ONE clinic session just to see who comes. Maybe selling it as a critique in any/all media would be even better. Then I could do it in my house or at someone's home easily. I just don't know yet.

Thanks for the thoughts. Charlie--thanks for letting me hijack your thread. I'll return it to you now! :D

Deborah

PeggyB
08-24-2008, 05:21 PM
Thanks for the thoughts and ideas.

Maybe selling it as a critique in any/all media would be even better. Then I could do it in my house or at someone's home easily. I just don't know yet.

Thanks for the thoughts. Charlie--thanks for letting me hijack your thread. I'll return it to you now! :D

Deborah

Just one more thought that may work for anyone who lives where plein air work is more easily predictable than here (and I suspect Sweden as well). If you are going to start with just one clinic, make it a plein air clinic for all mediums. As others have said Deborah, you don't need to fully understand a medium to be able to critique composition, drawing skills, or other general aspects of art. If you have your home as back-up that makes it "rent free". :)

Peggy

Studio-1-F
08-25-2008, 01:59 PM
. . . . Most churches (I've rented classrooms in various churches for twenty years) don't want you there on Saturday, and most art studios are maxed that day. . .
Maybe a school classroom? A public school would probably involve too much paperwork and red tape, but maybe the art studio/classroom of a local private school. Just a thought. Usually be empty on Saturdays, is my guess.

Jan

Colorix
08-25-2008, 03:51 PM
This thread is so chock-full of excellent advice about different types of classes, so, well, couldn't it be made easy to find? Maybe go into the library when it opens again?

I'll still be back with comments, I had a hectic weekend. (How life is when you're married to an extraverted guy...)

Studio-1-F
08-25-2008, 06:34 PM
How about a meeting room in a library (http://www.cabq.gov/library/policies/pdf/meetingroom_rulesaug2005.pdf)?

Jan