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InkyEss
08-17-2008, 06:20 AM
Hi Everyone!:wave:

What a wonderful forum. :clap: I took a look at the lessons in calligraphy and was sad to see the thread had died... However, it inspired me to have a try. I've never tried calligraphy before though have always admired the work of others.

Most of you seem to be very advanced and the beautiful work here is a joy to view. Please bear with me as I try somewhat awkwardly to get to grips with this - any advice would be very much appreciated as I'm kind of writing in the dark here :D

Armed with a Parker calligraphy pen and with the idea of starting at the beginning I tried the letter A (see below). Please tell me, should the letters be the same width as height? I was not sure to begin with and my A looked far too narrow so I widened it, which looked better. (sorry about the ink blot in the middle :lol: )

*Not quite sure how to get my pics in, but here goes...

TessDB
08-17-2008, 11:58 AM
Hi, Shaz! Glad to see you posting your practice pieces! No hints or suggestions from me, though. My calligraphy attempts are god-awful. :cool:

It looks like you got your images uploaded just fine. :thumbsup: And in case you didn't know, the size limits on images has increased-- as long as it's 72dpi, you can go up to 800x800.

If you can increase the size of your images & repost them, I bet it would be really helpful to the folks who actually know what they're doing with a pen! :lol:

Rosmary

InkyEss
08-17-2008, 12:40 PM
Thank you, Rosemary. I didn't want to bore everyone too much so I made the image not too big. :)

Here is one a little bigger.


And also I had a try at writing some text. Only used rough paper with lines whilst I practice, but once I get better I will get some nicer paper. I expect I shall still have to draw in lines otherwise I'll never keep it straight. I really need lots of practice though as you can see none of the lettering is the same and I need to get it looking more upright. :)

Hiraeth
08-17-2008, 07:54 PM
Hi again, Sharon!

Wow! You're making a very good start! I'm proud of you!

Here's a challenge for you. Take a look at your page of capital 'A's'--now, comparing your work to the model, cross out the ones that aren't up to snuff and underline your best examples. Then out of the best, see if you can identify the best of the best. Circle that one.

By doing this, you are accomplishing a couple of things. You are developing your eye. You are reconciling yourself with the idea that you are beginning and there will be letters that you WON'T want to reproduce. And, most importantly, you are identifying your best letters and charting your progress!

Thank you, Rosemary. I didn't want to bore everyone too much so I made the image not too big. :)

Here is one a little bigger.


And also I had a try at writing some text. Only used rough paper with lines whilst I practice, but once I get better I will get some nicer paper. I expect I shall still have to draw in lines otherwise I'll never keep it straight. I really need lots of practice though as you can see none of the lettering is the same and I need to get it looking more upright. :)

InkyEss
08-18-2008, 03:42 AM
Thank you Kim for that great advice. It really makes sense to locate the best form and hopefully after a while there will be more than one!:lol:

Seriously, I have looked at the letters and dismissed what I thought were poor and got excited when I located one I was quite pleased with, but I think to circle it is an excellent idea and as you say, it really helps to chart my progress.:thumbsup:

Is there special paper or rather, does it come in book form as I think it would be a good thing to have a book in which to practice?

Hiraeth
08-18-2008, 04:01 AM
Is there special paper or rather, does it come in book form as I think it would be a good thing to have a book in which to practice?

I would not recommend practicing in a book. You'll get much better results if you work with your paper on a flat surface, and you won't have to work around the bends of the spine.

Most people begin by lining the page or by placing a guide sheet under their paper. If you are going to be practicing a particular hand, you can make one master guide sheet and then either slip it under your paper so you can see the lines through it or you can multiple copies of the guidesheet.

Once you make a guide sheet, be sure to label the make and size of the nib it is intended for as well as the name of the hand.

There are guidesheets available online. Try these (http://www.margaretshepherd.com/guidelines/guidelines.html) at Margaret Shepherd's website. Her book, Learning Calligraphy, is a good first text for beginners.

InkyEss
08-18-2008, 01:37 PM
Thanks Kim, i will take your advice and thanks also for the link, that's excellent, just what I need. :thumbsup:

quills
08-18-2008, 02:45 PM
Apologies I'm still very intermittent... you definately need some good examples Sharon and to find out what x height means...
"Pen Lettering" by Ann Camp has everything you need ( apart from work :) ) to produce good lettering under 5.00 a small book but worth its weight in gold.
Decide on a GOOD, there are many POOR, example hand and learn that don't get bogged down in many different examples you need one foundation for all your other future hands.

Normal and best to chose the Foundation hand by Edward Johnston.

We seem to meet up at times in various places Shaz trust your OK, see the paintings doing fine.

Sorry I can't comment on all the work in here just now but will do :wave:

InkyEss
08-19-2008, 03:18 AM
Dear Quills, it's so lovely to see you again! :wave: I have always admired your work and your skill with calligraphy truly inspires me. Thank you so much for your advice, I am ordering the book now and cannot wait for it to arrive.

Shaz