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Maggie P
08-15-2008, 05:35 PM
I didn't enter many shows for a couple years, mostly because of time constraints, but resolved to enter more this year.

I entered the IAPS competition for the show that just was at the Butler Museum. I knew there was limited space and no artist would get more than one painting accepted, but I still decided to enter 5 so as to improve my chances. (If I bought lottery tickets, I'd probably buy them by the dozen; just as well I don't). I had 4 paintings that I thought were really strong possibilities. Then I decided to add one that I had down at the gallery which got lots of good comments but hadn't sold. Just in case, I picked it up and brought it home. It was good I did, as it was the one that was accepted, and the others declined.

So then I got entries ready for the Pastel Society of America exhibition. I thought about what has gotten into previous shows, as this is a tough show to get into. They seemed to accept lots of figurative work, so I did a night scene with lots of figures. They seemed to accept still life, and I don't really paint that, but I had a painting of a group of rugs on the outside of a building that I'd done recently. Then I added in one that had been "declined" by the IAPS show but which I thought was strong. Guess what? It was the one they accepted.

So then I decided to just see how a different judges might feel about a couple of those "declined" paintings, and I entered them into the IAPS web show along with some other new work. Still waiting for results on that one.

I also entered the Pastel Society of New Mexico show with three new works, all of which I'm pleased with but have not entered elsewhere. I won't get results for that one for another month or so. Now I'm planning some new pieces to enter for the IAPS show that will be at the Ventana Fine Art Gallery in Santa Fe next summer, opening just after the convention (see www.pastelinternational.com for the prospectus). There will probably be a lot of great artists entering that one, but I'll just do my best and take my chances.

Next week I'm jurying a show for the Piedmont Pastel Society. I always wonder if, when the results go out for a show I've juried, artists somewhere are saying "what was she thinking?"

ourcassidy!
08-15-2008, 05:56 PM
Congratulations Maggie! You are so correct...one just never knows what will be accepted...

I have your book and have read it from cover to cover! There is so much knowledge packed in there. Wonderful book for my reference/art library.

Took a look at your web site and your paintings are wonderful! Funny...when I saw the different catagories I thought well...southwest for sure will be a favorite for me as I am somewhat enchanted with that part of the country... Then took a look at the landscapes, Ireland next...well I admit I can't pick a favorite because they are all so beautiful!

Again, Congratulations!

Pam

PeggyB
08-15-2008, 06:50 PM
Congratulations Maggie, and of course you are so right! I was nodding my head and internally laughing the whole time I read what you wrote. :lol: I can't begin to relate all the stories I've heard along these same lines as you've told. I think the moral of the story is never give up, believe in yourself and your work, and eventually the "right" juror/judge will see your work.

Art competitions really are a "crap shoot" despite what some people may think. Although one can wish that the juror chooses only the best, one has to realize that same judge can only go according to what it looks like in a slide or cd. All too often - especially in slides it seems to me - a weak painting may be enhenced and a strong painting shows poorly due to lighting, etc.

As one who's seen thousands of slides entries over the years as a show chairperson, I always did wonder sometimes "what was she/he thinking" when a painting I've seen in real life that I know to have been a winner elsewhere hasn't been chosen. However, as a juror too I can absolutely understand "how" it has happened. You do good work Maggie - in painting and in jurying. Your consciousness is apparent.

Peggy

Scottyarthur
08-15-2008, 07:18 PM
Congrats Maggie and good luck on the others. for me I think jurors look for work that is farmiliar to them ie.. landscape, portraits, wildlife, Color, design ect. and sometimes in that they may over look a great painting that is not in that familuarity. that is why i think one juror will pick one peice and one juror will pick another. IMHO of course I could be totally wrong, :) lol it's happened before.

Maggie P
08-15-2008, 07:38 PM
Thanks for the congrats! I realized after I posted that I might not have sounded as pleased as I actually am that I got paintings accepted in both those shows. I really was happy about it, but still had to just marvel once again at how a painting can be declined in one show and accepted in another. Like other artists I've heard about, I've had the experience of having a painting that was declined once get into another show and actually win an award! I guess, as Peggy says, the moral is, you keep trying.

Scottyarthur, I expect you're right, sometimes jurors look for the familiar--but the opposite is also true. Sometimes we admire the unfamiliar, or the genre in which we do not paint. I'm a landscape painter, but I admire the work of portrait and still life artists, and as a judge I've often given awards to work in those categories rather than the more-familiar-to-me landscapes. Of course, as a judge I try to be impartial and look for the quality of the work, not subjects near and dear to my heart!

Maggie P
08-15-2008, 07:41 PM
Congratulations Maggie! You are so correct...one just never knows what will be accepted...

I have your book and have read it from cover to cover! There is so much knowledge packed in there. Wonderful book for my reference/art library.

Took a look at your web site and your paintings are wonderful! Funny...when I saw the different catagories I thought well...southwest for sure will be a favorite for me as I am somewhat enchanted with that part of the country... Then took a look at the landscapes, Ireland next...well I admit I can't pick a favorite because they are all so beautiful!

Again, Congratulations!

Pam

Pam, I'm so happy you like my book. And thanks for the nice comments on my work. Your comments remind me of my dilemma when people ask me what is my favorite place to paint. Scotland, of course, but well, Ireland too, and Spain but also Italy, and Australia, and then all the wonderful places here in the US...finally, I realize, the answer is, wherever I am! I just love it all, and hope that comes across in the paintings.

Deborah Secor
08-15-2008, 08:04 PM
Hey Maggie, would you show us the paintings in the IAPS and PSA show? Or point us to them on your web pages? I think the last time I visited you had entries strung out around the studio... Just curious! :wink2:

Deborah

Maggie P
08-15-2008, 08:21 PM
Hey Maggie, would you show us the paintings in the IAPS and PSA show? Or point us to them on your web pages? I think the last time I visited you had entries strung out around the studio... Just curious! :wink2:

Deborah

Okay, here they are. The first one, Early Snow, was accepted into the IAPS Butler show. The second one, First Kiss of Fall, was declined by the Butler judges but accepted by PSA. And the third one, Medieval Night in Cortona, is the one I was pretty sure PSA would accept--but I was wrong!

HarvestMoon
08-15-2008, 09:51 PM
wow Maggie- that is just fantastic!!!! Those are really hard shows too...now I have to go look at your site....great news- many congrads...

HarvestMoon
08-15-2008, 09:59 PM
Maggie the works on your site are fabulous- I love all the red roofs...but my favorite is Jurassic Peak....one of the best rock paintings I have ever seen....I can even figure out some of the basic geology there....have to say a lot of people just paint rocks as they imagine them to be, or 'all the same' or even worse, making up a scene and putting one totally different type of rock on one side of a stream or road than the other side if it looks 'nice'...and rarely get the formations accurately- you did an outstanding job.....(I paint lousy rocks despite my love for them BTW- I never get them right and it is so frustrating)...

Scottyarthur
08-15-2008, 11:12 PM
Those are beautiful Maggie, thanks for showing them and thanks to Deborah for asking :)

Maggie P
08-15-2008, 11:33 PM
wow Maggie- that is just fantastic!!!! Those are really hard shows too...now I have to go look at your site....great news- many congrads...

Sadly my site has not been updated in many months...one of those things I keep trying to get to but put off. Soon, though--I have lots of new work and would love to share it! Maybe after this next workshop trip...:)

jemgold
08-16-2008, 12:30 AM
Maggie, Congratulations on the entries! Very nice paintings.

Deborah Secor
08-16-2008, 11:09 AM
Maggie, I really thought the Cortona painting would get in, too! I remember it was on your easel and had a few finishing touches yet to be done. Gang, you can't imagine how much more colorful and interesting and lively that painting is IRL! (Well, you probably can imagine, since we all wish our work looked the same here as in real...)

It's true, you just never know...

Deborah

Tressa
08-16-2008, 01:53 PM
I've always found it interesting how artwork is juried and picked for shows, awards etc...some paintings I really loved didn't receive that much attention, and some I have actually disliked have garnered much. A painting I did in France that I thought of chucking,(i hated it, but was suggested to hang) sold imediately after framing and hanging.

PeggyB
08-16-2008, 02:30 PM
Maggie, I really thought the Cortona painting would get in, too! I remember it was on your easel and had a few finishing touches yet to be done. Gang, you can't imagine how much more colorful and interesting and lively that painting is IRL! (Well, you probably can imagine, since we all wish our work looked the same here as in real...)

It's true, you just never know...

Deborah

Well now there ya go folks. My point exactly about how differently a paintling in real life can look from that in a slide. I think this is especially true of pastels. It is very difficult for a camera to capture all the variations in color and value - expecially when there is high contrast of very dark and very light, and that's what is in Maggie's lovely Cortona painting. btw - that painting brought back fun memories of my time in Cortona.

Peggy

Maggie P
08-16-2008, 06:44 PM
I've always found it interesting how artwork is juried and picked for shows, awards etc...some paintings I really loved didn't receive that much attention, and some I have actually disliked have garnered much. A painting I did in France that I thought of chucking,(i hated it, but was suggested to hang) sold imediately after framing and hanging.

Tressa, I had a similar experience. I was down at my gallery in Albuquerque one day, and looking at my wall decided that one painting really was not up to par, and that I should take it home, throw the painting away and re-use the frame and glass. Then, while I was talking to another artist, a couple came in, looked around, pulled that painting off the wall and went up to the desk to pay for it. They were very happy with it, and I decided to just keep quiet and be grateful!

Kathryn Day
08-16-2008, 10:01 PM
Congratulations on your accepted entries. Hope to see you at the IAPS convention. I've been reading and studying your book that I got at the convention last year. Seem to always go back to it when I get in a slump and need to get inspired again.

Colorix
08-17-2008, 02:11 PM
Hello Maggie, congratulations!

Life is mysterious! I'm glad you told us, because it is encouraging!

Love your book, too! I recommend it to beginners as the very best one to learn from. I say: "She paints wonderfully, and is an excellent teacher too!" And you can get it in Sweden (in English).

Deborah Secor
08-17-2008, 05:33 PM
Well now there ya go folks. My point exactly about how differently a paintling in real life can look from that in a slide. I think this is especially true of pastels. It is very difficult for a camera to capture all the variations in color and value - expecially when there is high contrast of very dark and very light, and that's what is in Maggie's lovely Cortona painting. btw - that painting brought back fun memories of my time in Cortona.

Peggy

Yeah, but I still wouldn't let that fact keep me from seeing all the artwork I enjoy here. We all know the digis we see here aren't up to the quality of the real thing, and take that into consideration! That's part of the reason that when I have a painting I think deserves a closer look I post it on my blog. Then people can enlarge it and see it more completely, even if it's still not as good as real.... Ya know?

Are any of you like me? If a painting gets rejected I look at it and think it's not as good as I originally thought, and if it's accepted I think it's better than I thought. I really have to get over that! And usually I wouldn't have enough work to be picky, be forced to use what I had for the next show entry, and then it might be accepted, proving that it's all just based on other people's opinions--right? :wink2:

Deborah

PeggyB
08-17-2008, 07:13 PM
Yeah, but I still wouldn't let that fact keep me from seeing all the artwork I enjoy here. We all know the digis we see here aren't up to the quality of the real thing, and take that into consideration! That's part of the reason that when I have a painting I think deserves a closer look I post it on my blog. Then people can enlarge it and see it more completely, even if it's still not as good as real.... Ya know?

Are any of you like me? If a painting gets rejected I look at it and think it's not as good as I originally thought, and if it's accepted I think it's better than I thought. I really have to get over that! And usually I wouldn't have enough work to be picky, be forced to use what I had for the next show entry, and then it might be accepted, proving that it's all just based on other people's opinions--right? :wink2:

Deborah

So true. It is often the only way people have of seeing any contemporary artwork on a regular basis outside their home area. Having the option to enlarge a painting on line is very useful too..

:lol: I think almost eveyone has experiened what you describe in the second paragraph. Darn it all I hate it when my "humanity" comes into play, but it is nice to be reminded that others are also human .. :)

Peggy

Gigibrooke
08-20-2008, 02:26 AM
Maggie, Congratulations to you and good luck on the other ones.

I especially like "Medieval Nights in Cortona". I have not seen you do much with figures.
You are right, you just don't know about judges. I have been asked to judge a couple shows this summer and gave an abstract a first place. It deserved it!!!

I have gotten an award in one show and rejected in another with the same painting. Last year a painting was rejected by the show judge, but when I went to pick it up a couple wanted to buy it for their newly remodeled home. She said, right near the staircase. So which is best selling or being accepted in a show. In another juried show, I received a $750. award, but the painting has not sold.

Again congratulations.
Marilyn Witt

seosamhin
09-11-2008, 08:58 PM
Congratulations!!!
Julia

scall0way
09-12-2008, 11:02 AM
Are any of you like me? If a painting gets rejected I look at it and think it's not as good as I originally thought, and if it's accepted I think it's better than I thought. I really have to get over that!

:lol: I don't have much experience with this as I'm pretty clueless about entering shows, or even finding out about shows to enter. But, being so suggestible, I'm sure I'd feel the same way. I've only submitted paintings to a juried show twice, to the two annual Pastel Society of New Jersey shows. My painting was accepted for the first and rejected for the second.

One thing that bothers me about the PSNJ show, which Maggie's post illustrates so well, is that you are only allowed to submit *one* painting. Only one and no more. Last year I agonized between several different paintings and finally chose the one I loved the most - and it was rejected. So naturally I kept wondering if I would have had any better luck with either of the other two! But when you can only submit one it's a real gamble.

I'm in that same boat now. The third annual show is coming up this fall and again you can only submit *one* painting, and again I'm agonizing over "which one" might have the best shot - knowing nothing about who might jury the show or anything! I'd happily pay more to submit 2-3 and but it can't be done.

I'm clueless about submitting slides or jpgs either, as for the PSNJ show you have to bring the actual painting to them in person, then wait around for hours to see if you get a phone call to come pick up your work (reject), and if you don't get a phone call you are in. And once again they are having the receiving on a mid-day Monday when I'll be at work and can't possibly take my painting there. :)

jemgold
09-12-2008, 11:24 AM
I have a question about entering shows - must all the entries in one show be of the same subject? Such as all landscapes, or all animals, etc. It is this way in Watercolor but not sure about pastel shows.

Tressa
09-12-2008, 11:35 AM
No, you can enter diffedrent genres, as long as it is not subject specific