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Kong
08-12-2008, 05:33 AM
Hi I'm new
Start with an older one

Quiet fishing ~ Egret 20X36" Acrylic on panel.

Kong
08-12-2008, 05:41 AM
One more. A little different.

A clown ( musical group ) called, " Purple People Eaters ".

58.5" X 90" acrylic on canvas.

Kong
08-12-2008, 06:05 AM
~ Nocturne at George and Locke.

~ 30" X 36 " acrylic on panel

roy-p
08-12-2008, 06:27 AM
serious talent Kong... but you already know that.

ocmd123
08-12-2008, 07:42 AM
Beautiful work! The last one is my favorite. Very Hopperesque. Thanks for sharing!

arl
08-12-2008, 08:14 AM
I loved the paintings and your use of light and shadow. I loved the reflection on the water in the first work.

Linee
08-12-2008, 09:17 AM
Thanks for sharing these. Amazing work!

TxAggieDarlin
08-12-2008, 09:33 AM
Well, I am speechless....these are spectacular...Makes me want to chunk my paintings....:). Great job

Barbieanne
08-12-2008, 09:49 AM
Impressive work! Show us some more. Barbie

OkeeKat
08-12-2008, 10:16 AM
WOW these are Magnificent!! I love the details in the band painting, So realistic, such talent!! the lighting on the bird is amazing, they all are!!
thanks for sharing!! how long did it take you to do the large band painting??

LavenderFrost
08-12-2008, 10:52 AM
Great work! I really like the detail you put into the foliage and grass.

zoropb
08-12-2008, 11:18 AM
Beautiful technical work Kong.

Sergio

Charlie's Mum
08-12-2008, 12:03 PM
Welcome to the forum Kong - I see you believe in working on a large scale :D

Very nice work - thanks for sharing.

If you check out the link in my signature it should tell you how to upload your work via the Uploader links so they show full size (up to 600pixels wide/high).

Antony Burt
08-12-2008, 12:56 PM
Pretty awesome work! All the works you have presented are great, but my faves are the first two.

susme48
08-12-2008, 01:38 PM
Welcome to the Acrylics forum, Kong! I can see that you might be new here, but not to painting! These are wonderful...cannot wait to see more!! Such marvelous detail!!

gurleygirl
08-12-2008, 02:51 PM
Wow, thought they were photos!
Tracey

TxAggieDarlin
08-12-2008, 03:32 PM
I had to come back and look again, these are unbelievable ;)
Would you go into some detail as to HOW you do this? I am amazed ;)

1100ww
08-12-2008, 05:34 PM
Awesome work.

camaur
08-12-2008, 05:51 PM
I am speechless. Beautiful. I love the water on the first one and the third one is exceptional. Aw, they are all just wonderful.

Camaur

taffy
08-12-2008, 07:55 PM
Absolutely Magic, you have a tremendous talent, show us more:clap: :clap: :clap: Brian

Bizkit
08-12-2008, 08:04 PM
Welcome Kong....outstanding work you have there. Please show us some WIP's sometime if you have some that would be interesting!!
Oh, and dont forget to post your picture on the "Post your Pic" thread........

Nice to have you!

Kong
08-12-2008, 11:51 PM
Thank you all for your kind attention to my work.

Here is a small older acrylic painting on 13.5 " X 28 "panel.

~ Vacation at a Huron Beach

loobyteacher
08-12-2008, 11:54 PM
excellent

Kong
08-13-2008, 03:23 AM
I had to come back and look again, these are unbelievable ;)
Would you go into some detail as to HOW you do this? I am amazed ;)

Hello TxAggieDarlin. That's fun to say .

I'm not sure my process can be entirely explained. At some point I might produce a comprehensive wip, but most of what I do probably is found in the archives of this forum. The lion share of what I do is self taught. I'm guessing a lot of other people use similar processes to achieve results save those little bits and pieces that make our work unique.

Basically you need a good drawing, I like charcoal. Then you need a well established tonal map. ( all darks and lights ) Then you need an approach to colour that enables you to build from a good foundational colour, resulting in a good ceiling or roof in the finale.

My primary thinking about colour is two fold. First I start by evaluating the most influential colours in the under body of the subject according to the tonal map.
Then I slowly apply those colours that will through the support of those first under painting colours, result in the primary cast that conforms to the temperature and light conditions I'm trying to reproduce. Then I simply add the details according to my personal sensibilities.

The word Illusion is very important to me and if you look carefully you will see that I try my very best to use as few brush strokes as I can on order to achieve the " illusion of real. So I could be called an Alla Prima Painter in the true sense of the term, and In the spirit of a Frans Hals for example. But my work also belongs to what I call " Canadian Realism " in the spirit of the term used and coined by Jack Chambers as, " perceptual realism ". Lets face it, all we are doing is mucking about in order to fool the mind of the audience into a state of suspended disbelief.

In other words , we are trying to incorporate the viewer into our process as an accomplice, without them even knowing how.

This requires a certain level of calligraphic skill to be able to, (by way of brush strokes ) suggest all the elements of texture, light, temperature, and the illusions of depth etc. ; that can only be accomplished through many hours of doing.
And perhaps the added element of sheer un relenting desire to break through the inevitable limitations of our own student-hood.

roy-p
08-13-2008, 04:20 AM
The word Illusion is very important to me and if you look carefully you will see that I try my very best to use as few brush strokes as I can on order to achieve the " illusion of real.
This is one aspect of photorealism I have difficulty coming to terms with. Why is it that, with the obvious skills that painters like you have, you would try to suppress the identity of the artist (in terms of as few brush strokes as possible) apart from the background knowledge that the viewer has about the work, that this indeed is a human creation and not a photograph? You mentioned Frans Hals; Now... speaking of him in a context other than the one in which you mentioned him - isn't the identity of the man behind the work so very evident in the lavish brushstrokes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Frans_Hals_021.jpg) of Frans Hals? Now all these artists, Frans Hals, Anders Zorn, John Singer Sargent could have been stupendous photo realists if they had applied themselves to that style, but they chose not to, and we stand enthralled at their magical wielding of the painting brush - while guys like you, even with your potential skill, try to 'hide' behind this photo-illusion. So what, if I may humbly ask, is the spirit that moves you to do so? Why must you represent 'reality' the way you see it, but remove your signature presence from the work? I mean I can identify you by the choice of your subject matter, and your composition and framing, just like I can identify a talented photographer, but why not through brush strokes as well - since after all, you are a painter? Don't know if that made any sense though :) But thank you so very much for your elaborate description of the process.

Kong
08-13-2008, 06:04 AM
This is one aspect of photorealism I have difficulty coming to terms with. Why is it that, with the obvious skills that painters like you have, you would try to suppress the identity of the artist (in terms of as few brush strokes as possible) .


I'm not sure I understand what you're saying. How would I be " suppressing my identity " by using less brush strokes ? In fact that would result in the opposite effect.

And why do you call it " photo realism " ?
I used the term " perceptual realism. " In other words, mimicking reality is not the same as mimicking photo replicas. Photo replicas are only tools used to assist in the attempt to replicate the real.


Now if I don't accomplish that then that's a different topic.

But in my view the quest for the illusion of real in paint is better served by moving towards the impressionistic rather than anal map making technique. If you go to my oil painting thread you can see some close ups of a painting of abandoned shoes. I think it will clear up any idea that I paint a lot of detail. And illustrate how the looser brushstrokes can emulate reality better than a tight treatment can. And the looser one paints the more individual personality one transmits.

In my view photo realism fails to look real.

roy-p
08-13-2008, 06:20 AM
looser brushstrokes can emulate reality better than a tight treatment can. And the looser one paints the more individual personality one transmits.
Ahh... I think we are on the same frequency here. When you said "I try my very best to use as few brush strokes as I can on order to achieve the illusion of real" I was puzzled. I thought you were referring to a 'tight technique' where as few brushstrokes as is possible are visible. Thank you for clearing that up Kong!

~~Kathleen
08-13-2008, 07:06 AM
Very nice. You've done this before:lol:
~~Kathleen

Grace5
08-13-2008, 07:19 AM
Fantastic work on all of your paintings. I have seen the close ups of the abandoned shoes, very loose paint strokes, just amazing.

Bobbo
08-13-2008, 07:27 AM
impressive Kong
love the clowns

TxAggieDarlin
08-13-2008, 09:55 AM
Thank you Kong for the information. I just love looking at your work. I sit there and go, this is impossible (well, it would be for me), but I enjoy looking at it!!!:thumbsup:

sonita
08-13-2008, 10:53 AM
Amazing work!! Thanks for sharing and hope to see more :)
Soni

Kong
08-13-2008, 07:04 PM
Thank you very much.

Here is one that could easily be posted in landscape painting but stands out as a strong acrylic painting.

I call it ~ Treasure Hunter~ And represents my affection for the most common everyday events in our lives.

54 " X 58 " on canvas.

mpattie
08-13-2008, 07:23 PM
:clap: WOW. What else is there to say. Your are very talented.
Pat

Kong
08-14-2008, 02:11 AM
Ahh... I think we are on the same frequency here. When you said "I try my very best to use as few brush strokes as I can on order to achieve the illusion of real" I was puzzled. I thought you were referring to a 'tight technique' where as few brushstrokes as is possible are visible. Thank you for clearing that up Kong!


Right , great. To be fair Prosenjit Roy, most of what I've posted on all the forums here are mixed up in the chronology.
This Acrylic painting here for example is older and much tighter than I work now.

~ The Look Out~ acrylic on canvas, 38 " X 54 "

Kong
08-14-2008, 02:17 AM
impressive Kong
love the clowns

Hey, glad you like that one. It was one of my first large paintings and broke my fear of working big. My largest to date is 120" x 72" .

zoropb
08-14-2008, 09:08 AM
Kong I like the crow one. They are one of the smartest birds in the world even smarter than the large Macaws. A test was done with many birds on Brain power and they were number one. Very nice photo realism work.

Sergio

Artchrispy
08-14-2008, 09:55 AM
Speechless. They are all masterpieces!

LavenderFrost
08-14-2008, 12:44 PM
Oh wow, those leaves! I want to paint like you! But I could never be that patient.

PattiLou
08-14-2008, 01:01 PM
Your paintings are wonderful and I want to paint 'loose' like you, LOL! I get impatient and in a hurry... I want it done now. So, can you tell us how long it usually takes you to do an average size painting? I strolled over to oils and checked that out also. They are all fantastic and I just want to keep looking at them. The closeups do look sort of loose, which is surprising to me after viewing the pictures you posted. *mumbling to myself... practice, practice, patience, patience.*

Patti

Kong
08-14-2008, 08:33 PM
Cheers mpattie , zoropb , Artchrispy, LavenderFrost, PattiLou.

I'll be back

tbolt
08-14-2008, 11:02 PM
Wowserz!!!!!!!

Kong
08-15-2008, 02:17 AM
Your paintings are wonderful and I want to paint 'loose' like you, LOL! I get impatient and in a hurry... I want it done now. So, can you tell us how long it usually takes you to do an average size painting? I strolled over to oils and checked that out also. They are all fantastic and I just want to keep looking at them. The closeups do look sort of loose, which is surprising to me after viewing the pictures you posted. *mumbling to myself... practice, practice, patience, patience.*

Patti

Well if I start a small painting in the morning, say 9 am on a 18"X24". By the end of the day I'm about half finishes. Then my progress starts to slow down, and I'm looking at about another four or five half day sessions to complete. Because of just getting fidgety about riding the dragon without messing it up. And I usually start prepping new supports and laying out new paintings in between tea and coffee and phone calls and forum chit chat and kids and getting out there to find new subject matter etc. etc. . . .

Once painted a ten foot painting in 30 days which I though was pretty fast.

PattiLou
08-15-2008, 09:46 AM
Well if I start a small painting in the morning, say 9 am on a 18"X24". By the end of the day I'm about half finishes. Then my progress starts to slow down, and I'm looking at about another four or five half day sessions to complete. Because of just getting fidgety about riding the dragon without messing it up. And I usually start prepping new supports and laying out new paintings in between tea and coffee and phone calls and forum chit chat and kids and getting out there to find new subject matter etc. etc. . . .

Once painted a ten foot painting in 30 days which I though was pretty fast.

Thanks for the info... yes that is fast. Fidgety, yeah that's probably what I am and then I piddle too much. :rolleyes: >>>>>Off to practice some more. :wave:

Patti

lilbelle
08-15-2008, 03:38 PM
Absolutely amazing work Kong! The details of the grass and pavement are fabulous and I really love The Look Out. Astounding detail work on all of them!!!

Kong
08-15-2008, 10:51 PM
Absolutely amazing work Kong! The details of the grass and pavement are fabulous and I really love The Look Out. Astounding detail work on all of them!!!
Cheers lolbelle, Most of the time I can let a painting go but " The Look Out "
was one I really hated to part with. And now I'm trying to buy it back.
At the time I had no choice. I needed to comply with a business agreement and had to sell. The painting depicts my wife at the front door of our home. Would like to have been able to leave it to my son.

edtree
08-16-2008, 08:47 AM
:wave: Hello Kong, and welcome!

I've spent some time this morning meandering through this thread studying and admiring all the works you've shared and reading the questions and answers. Very impressive are all of these. Once I've finished here, I'm heading over to oils to see some close-ups! I'm anxious to see your technique for depicting the illusion of real with the fewest brush strokes. :)

Extraordinary light and shadow, and details in just the right places. Also, your ability to choose the exact right colors take your work to yet another level. Brilliant! I find your work extremely inspiring! I'll have to come back again right before I start painting again! Thank you for sharing these with us! :clap: :D :clap:

Elizabeth

Kong
08-16-2008, 11:13 AM
:wave: Hello Kong, and welcome!

~~

I find your work extremely inspiring! I'll have to come back again right before I start painting again! Thank you for sharing these with us! :D

Elizabeth
Thank You Elizabeth. That's what sharing our work is all about isn't it.

By the way, I looked at your work too. You are doing some very beautiful paintings. You have the magic touch.