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Dunkaroos
07-03-2008, 07:11 PM
I have 5 layers ofpaint that I was like to remove.

I tried to paint over it, but the color doesn't come up too nicely.

Thank you. :)

keenart
07-03-2008, 07:31 PM
Did you try the Atelier Interactive Artists' Acrylics, which can be rehydrated?

George Servais
07-03-2008, 07:36 PM
I have had some success using Purell hand sanitizer (without Aloe). I lay the canvas down and pour a generous amount onto the affected area and let it sit. Occasionally test for softening. Wipe with a damp cloth. I also use this to remove dried acrylic paint from brushes.

Lady Carol
07-03-2008, 07:43 PM
I think chalk it up to experience and sack the canvas. I am not sure you can get it off all that well but denatured alcohol should at least get some of it off.

idylbrush
07-03-2008, 08:54 PM
Have you considered priming it before applying any more paint?

You can lightly sand, prime and start over sometimes. Not always but sometimes.

Dunkaroos
07-03-2008, 09:19 PM
I'm using Utrecht Artists' Acrylic (professional grade?)

What is prime? This is my first painting. :o

Will rubbing alcohol work?

Thanks, guys.

Raymo
07-03-2008, 10:16 PM
I paint over my paintings all the time. Many, many layers lol. I just gesso over it a cpl times and i've never had anything show through. Drives my wife bananas but I do it anyways. She thinks everything I paint is a masterpiece, lol.

Aires
07-03-2008, 10:39 PM
I recyle old paintings all the time and the only times I remove paint is when it is still wet. A couple of coats of good grade gesso usually does it but one can use more coats if you sand between coats. You'd be surprised at how much money you can save when shopping at a flea market for used picture frames. Many frames have stretched canvas paintings in them which I regard as a pleasant bonus. A good cleaning and gesso soon have a fresh surface to paint on. No need to try to remove old paint, just cover with very good grade gesso. This technique works just as well with hard surfaces that have been used as a substrate. My esperience has been that board sometimes requires a bit more sanding or going over with steel wool but good gesson provides a new surface on paintable materials. Oen other tip - an artist at an art museum said she never worries about texture showing through from a previous painting. That she regards it as a bonus because it adds interest. A helpful tip to remember as it stretches the art budget to reuse previously painted substrates. Hope this helps.

Aires
07-03-2008, 10:49 PM
As a newbie member I may have posted in the wrong place. Let me try again. I reuse old paintings all the time by coating the painting with at least two coats of very good quality gesso. One can use more gesso coats if you sand lightly between coats. I am also reminded of an artist who said she loves using old paintings, textures and bumps included, as she thinks it adds interest to her paintings. A good art budget stretcher is to watch for good picture frames at flea markets; they often have stretched canvas pictures in them and I regard them as a bonus gift. A cleaning and gesso soon have a fresh surface to paint on and with a frame that fits and ready to hang. How could you get better than that! Another bonus is that a used canvas does not that pristine surface you hate to experiment on. Some of my best paintings have been when I was using a used canvas and didn't give a hoot! The gesso trick also works on hard substrates such as wood or hardboard which have been previously painted. The onyl time I ever remove paint is when it is still wet and wipes off easily with solvent. Gesso and enjoy! My esperience has been that If the gesso doesn't cover it probably is not the quality brand I want to use.:wave:

CrystalGA
07-03-2008, 11:07 PM
This may not work on canvas, but test in a hidden spot to see if it works for you.
This is how I remove paint in our shop (airbrushed or brush) works like magic.
I dissolve the paints soft by spritizing quite moderately. "OxyClean" or "Mr. Muscle Oxy" cleaner directly.
Set stand for 60 seconds or longer.
Something about the formula makes the acrylic break down within one minute and turn to putty.
It can then be scraped off. Repeat again for one more minute for stubborn hard remaining paint.

Dunkaroos
07-04-2008, 10:07 AM
I just tried rubbing alcohol and it worked!

Will this ruin by canvas?

BeeCeeEss
07-04-2008, 02:10 PM
Rubbing alcohol is good for removing acrylic paint, as you have discovered. Just be careful about working in a well ventilated area and be doubly careful about how you dispose of any cloths or paper towels you use to wipe the paint away.

Another product that will remove acrylic paints is Turpenoid Natural. It is a citrus-based, non-flammable solvent. It has a very strong smell, in my opinion, but at least it's non-flammable.

Rather than stripping off the old paint completely, I agree with Howard (idylbrush) about lightly sanding the dry surface and re-priming (with acrylic gesso) the surface. Just be sure to completely clean off any loose dust from the painting surface before you apply some fresh gesso. If the old paint layers weren't too heavily built up, this should give you a workable surface to try another painting.

Beverly

~~Kathleen
07-04-2008, 03:08 PM
Rather than stripping off the old paint completely, I agree with Howard (idylbrush) about lightly sanding the dry surface and re-priming (with acrylic gesso) the surface. Just be sure to completely clean off any loose dust from the painting surface before you apply some fresh gesso. If the old paint layers weren't too heavily built up, this should give you a workable surface to try another paintin

Is there a reason that you do not want to re-prime with gesso?
I have re-primed many canvas' and it always worked for me!
I am baffled here.
~~Kathleen

Dunkaroos
07-04-2008, 07:13 PM
What does it mean to "prime with gesso"?

Any guides I can follow?

Adriantmax
07-04-2008, 08:34 PM
gesso is just a kind of primer paint. Usualy white that you paint evenly over the entire surface when preparing a surface for painting.

Here you go.

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=Lh9T4Sfzgig&feature=related

Lady Carol
07-04-2008, 10:15 PM
I just tried rubbing alcohol and it worked!

Will this ruin by canvas?
It shouldn't ruin the canvas as it will evaporate quickly and be gone.

Lady Carol
07-04-2008, 10:17 PM
Gesso is an under coat that you paint over the canvas. This prevents the paint from being sucked in to the canvas too much and will slow the drying of the paint a little. Your canvas that you bought should have had a coat of gesso on it at time of purchase.

Shirl Parker
07-06-2008, 12:15 PM
I know someone who uses oven cleaner to start over. I forget whether they are painting oil or acrylic.

keenart
07-06-2008, 12:40 PM
My Old Art teacher used Formaldehyde to remove the Oil Paint. Do not know if it would work on Acrylic.

Ms.Understood
07-06-2008, 09:25 PM
Interesting and helpful tips--I wish I was more patient sometimes--great youtube clip!