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ocmd123
06-12-2008, 09:51 AM
Let's see if we can do a collective brainstorm and talk about any new techniques for blending that any of you are doing, or have experimented with.
Some of the things we know about, and have explored in the past, are blending pencils (Prisma's colorless blender and Lrya Splender Blender), burnishing with lighter colors, layering, solvents (turpentine, turpenoid, rubber cement thinner, citrus thinner, alcohol, nail polish remover), so let's stay away from those unless you have a new technique for using them.

Friesin has mentioned the use of oils. While that may not be new, we haven't had much discussion about it here. In doing a search, I did see information about an artists grade walnut oil.

If you have something new you're doing in the way of blending, let us know. Showing a before/after, or a how-to would certainly be helpful. Even if you tried something that didn't work well, tell us about that, too. Remember, stay away from the tried and true. Think outside the box!

RobinZ
06-12-2008, 12:48 PM
I've used baby oil. It definitely works. But I am worried about any material to blend ... have no idea about how it alters it chemically, or affects the paper.

I blend with a white plastic eraser. A very light touch. But only with prismacolor on mi tientes, don't know how that would work on any other surface.

TessDB
06-13-2008, 07:17 AM
I've used an eraser, too. It takes a gentle touch, because there is a fine line between moving pigment and removing it! :rolleyes:

On paper of all sorts, I've been using those white cotton makeup pads. Works *great* to drag color around & smooth out pencil strokes. Doesn't work as well as I want it to on drafting film.

Rosemary

ocmd123
06-13-2008, 08:20 AM
On paper of all sorts, I've been using those white cotton makeup pads. Works *great* to drag color around & smooth out pencil strokes. Doesn't work as well as I want it to on drafting film.

Rosemary

I'll have to give this a try. I often use Prismas colorless blender, but on some colors the result isn't an even blending of colors. I may see if I have any of those laying around and try it on my current piece.

Robin, I'm anxious to try the baby oil, too. I really haven't been all that satisfied with the effects of some of the other solvents.

NancyPH
06-13-2008, 08:35 AM
I love using a bristle/stencil brushes to blend my colors together and give the look of an oil painting. I really dislike using solvents and don't like the way solvents make a picture look.

Below are some examples of what I've done with using a brush.

ocmd123
06-13-2008, 08:47 AM
I love using a bristle/stencil brushes to blend my colors together and give the look of an oil painting.

Oohh. I was hoping someone would jump in here with this one! Thanks, Nancy. What type of pencils are you using? And also, what type of brushes? I'm picturing stiff, short bristle brushes.
The results you're getting are definitely painterly. The fur on the white dog is really well done.

kywildcat
06-13-2008, 09:24 AM
I love using a bristle/stencil brushes to blend my colors together and give the look of an oil painting. I really dislike using solvents and don't like the way solvents make a picture look.

Below are some examples of what I've done with using a brush.
Ooooo, Nancy! I really like the cat pic and the tulip. That's really neat (stencil brushes) I'll have to give that a try. I usually use burnishing or a colorless blender.

kywildcat
06-13-2008, 09:31 AM
I've used baby oil. It definitely works. But I am worried about any material to blend ... have no idea about how it alters it chemically, or affects the paper.

I blend with a white plastic eraser. A very light touch. But only with prismacolor on mi tientes, don't know how that would work on any other surface.
Robin, like you, I am hesitant to try oil-based solvents because I don't know the affect that they will have on the paper in the long run. So far, I've only tried rubbing alcohol since it seems to dissolve or dissipate fairly quickly. I want to try Zest-It that I've seen mentioned on the forums or in the CP library, but can't ever remember to look for it when I'm at my supply store.

darlingart
06-13-2008, 10:25 AM
I've used oil paint stiff bristle brushes as well, also pieces of felt, and cotton flannel which give different blending effects.

Michelle

NancyPH
06-13-2008, 02:24 PM
Oohh. I was hoping someone would jump in here with this one! Thanks, Nancy. What type of pencils are you using? And also, what type of brushes? I'm picturing stiff, short bristle brushes.
The results you're getting are definitely painterly. The fur on the white dog is really well done.
I use all kinds of brushes. For the bristle brushes, I have the following: Color & Co de LeFranc & Bourfeois sizes 4, 6, 8, and 12. I also use some that have natural colored wooden handles, but nothing is written on them, so I don't know what kind. My bristle brushes have not cost me more than $1.00 each yet. I get them at Jerry's Artarama (the store near me is having a clearance on these brushes - .50 cents each. I buy about 10 each time I go in).

For stencil brushes, I use wooden handled ones from wal-mart (expensive though), Royal Stencil brushes, and Royal & Langnickel Stencil brushes (I usually buy a big pack of about 12 or 15 of a variety of sizes. They come as domed, filbert, and standard styles. I got these at Michael's Craft Store for $7.99).

No matter which ones I get, I usually trim them a little bit, but you have to be careful with that. If you trim too much, you'll just brush all of your pencil and color off of the paper rather than blending them together and filling the tooth.

Below are some pics I took specifically to use in a WIP I did on another forum. It doesn't show all of the brushes I use (only one flat bristle brush, the rest are stencil brushes) but it gives you an idea. I also included a brief blending lesson from when I made the tulip, which was done on WHITE Pastelbord (the same tulip I posted earlier). I showed how I got the rich black color on a white surface, and how I blended them colors together. Well, I explained all of that in a post that went with the pics, but I think the photo may explain a lot by itself.

I have used the Prisma colorless blender, but I like the brush better. However, I only use the brushes for a textured surface, like Colourfix paper or pastelbord, surfaces like that. I'm not sure about its affect on regular paper. You'd have to be really careful.

Hope this helps some!

Oh, and thanks everyone for your kind comments! :D And I almost forgot, I use Prismas, Derwent Coloursoft, and sometimes Polychromos and Derwent Artists/Studio pencils.

objectivistartist
06-13-2008, 06:51 PM
interesting, there is used black in the blending - I use tuscan red, indigo blue, and dark umber or brown - tho do have several old blacks yet to be rid of... but never have used a brush for the blending... guess ought to try for it.. any reason why using the dark green?

Lady Carol
06-13-2008, 07:22 PM
I use a #6 Loew-Cornell bristle brush that I have cut the bristles down to about a quarter inch. It is small enough to get into the tightest corners and yet big enough to push the pigment around and blend the colours together. A definite must for me.

ocmd123
06-13-2008, 08:33 PM
Nancy, thanks for sharing all of the information regarding your blending with brushes. This is something I definitely want to try, though I often use smoother surfaces, so I'd likely need to go easy. I'm thinking the brushes might brush the color off of a smooth surface. I'll give it a try and find out!
Carol, thanks, also, for sharing the brush you use!

NancyPH
06-13-2008, 10:06 PM
interesting, there is used black in the blending - I use tuscan red, indigo blue, and dark umber or brown - tho do have several old blacks yet to be rid of... but never have used a brush for the blending... guess ought to try for it.. any reason why using the dark green?
Uhm ...... because mixing a dark red (Tuscan Red), dark green (obviously Dark Green), and dark blue (Indigo Blue) make black silly! :D Then I add black over that to make it an even deeper black.

friesin
06-14-2008, 07:58 AM
I, as a newbie in CP, surely can' t help feeling a bit confused by this discussion :confused:

How do you use a brush with CP s but without solvent ???

(Excuse me if this question is too silly or the answer is too obvious, but I am really new to this medium)

Andi Rebirth
06-14-2008, 08:16 AM
Friesen, I use one to push the pigment into the paper and blend it, they must be stiff though. I am sure someone has a better explination. Basically you are blending with the bristles, so it comes in really handy. no silly questions in colored pencil, we all had to learn new things too. Andi:wave:

Andi Rebirth
06-14-2008, 08:22 AM
I use pieces of soft leather to blend with. Also use a makeup sponge, I like that for oil based pencils, doesn't work so well on Prisma's.
the leather works really well. I also use a pastel blender for tight places, they have different tips and sizes you can buy. They have a rubber tip and you can get them in soft, or harder varieties. Andi

RobinZ
06-14-2008, 10:08 AM
I've used brushes on paper. It does remove some pigment, but it forces it into the pits of the paper, so was helpful in the early stage.

Friesin, the brush just pushes the pigment around a bit, it doesn't liquify it like a solvent or oil, just moves or smears it, I guess would be the way to describe. Same as with an eraser or makeup thingy.

The colorless blender pencil adds wax...the brush, eraser, makeup pad add nothing, just forces the pigment around.

RobinZ
06-14-2008, 10:08 AM
I have some pastel blenders...great tip, I'll have to try that as well.

NancyPH
06-14-2008, 12:21 PM
I, as a newbie in CP, surely can' t help feeling a bit confused by this discussion :confused:

How do you use a brush with CP s but without solvent ???

(Excuse me if this question is too silly or the answer is too obvious, but I am really new to this medium)
No silly questions here friesin!

When using a brush, it is always best to also use a softer leaded colored pencil, such as Prismacolors Premiers or Derwent Coloursofts. The brush can oush the color around much easier, but I have also used harder pencils like Derwent Studio & Artist pencils as well as Polychromos. It's just harder and you have to be more careful with harder pencils.

Like Robin said, the brush pushes the pigment around surface and into the tooth of the surface. However, this does NOT allow you to be messy with your application of the pencil! In whatever manner you apply the pencil, that is how it will come out no matter how much you blend. Therefore, the smoother you apply the pencil on the surface, and the more you cover the surface, the better the results will be when you blend the colors together. As such, when you lay the pencil loosely, not covering the surface, that is exactly what you will get when you blend - loose messy color! And remember, once you blend with a brush, it's either very difficult to remove the color (erase), or impossible, so be sure of what you are doing and experiment before doing a piece seriously so if you make a mistake, it's not as big a deal.