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Rybakova_Olga
06-14-2008, 06:20 AM
Hi!
It is my Bouguereaus "Young Girl Defending Herself Against Cupid"
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Jun-2008/144896-rybakova_olga_amur_wetcanvas1.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Jun-2008/144896-rybakova_olga_amur_wetcanvas_fragment2.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Jun-2008/144896-rybakova_olga_amur_wetcanvas_fragment3.jpg

zaanor
06-14-2008, 06:14 PM
Wonderful work :)
Can you tell more about the process?

LeeLynch
06-14-2008, 06:28 PM
Beautiful!

I second the request for more information for your process?

Which oil paints do you use?
What surface did you paint on?

Rybakova_Olga
06-16-2008, 01:36 AM
Thanks! :)

I paint on linen oil, pinen and dammar varnish. On a canvas. The most part of paints is made in Russia.

I will talk about the process later.

Here are other my works:http://artnow.ru/en/gallery/206/4547/picture/0.html

Rybakova_Olga
06-17-2008, 02:54 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-Jun-2008/144896-rybakova_olga_amur1.jpg
Terms which I do not know in English, I shall replace on Russian. The first stage. A underpainting, burnt umber. The sky, mountains, the fabric is made by cold colors.

Rybakova_Olga
06-17-2008, 02:56 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-Jun-2008/144896-rybakova_olga_amur2.jpg

Rybakova_Olga
06-17-2008, 03:08 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-Jun-2008/144896-rybakova_olga_amur3.jpg

Rybakova_Olga
06-17-2008, 03:12 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-Jun-2008/144896-rybakova_olga_amur4.jpg
Leaves and body of the girl. From left to right and from top to down. I painted a head after a body to be assured in selection of color.

Rybakova_Olga
06-17-2008, 03:28 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-Jun-2008/144896-rybakova_olga_amur5.JPG
Paints: Neapolitan skin, Cadmium red light, Marsh paint.

Shadows - Cobalt violet, burnt umber.
Light spots - Neapolitan pink, burnt umber.

Rybakova_Olga
06-17-2008, 03:35 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-Jun-2008/144896-rybakova_olga_amur5_big.JPG

Rybakova_Olga
06-17-2008, 03:36 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-Jun-2008/144896-rybakova_olga_amur6.JPG

Rybakova_Olga
06-17-2008, 03:44 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-Jun-2008/144896-rybakova_olga_amur7.JPG
It is difficult to tell how many here layers because here it is a lot of transparent layers on different places.

Rybakova_Olga
06-17-2008, 04:00 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-Jun-2008/144896-rybakova_olga_amur8.jpg
This not so successful a photo. I have made many translucent layers.
I has painted with red their palms, fingers, heels, noses, ears, elbows and the most beautiful parts of a body;).
Then i has painted cold parts of a body,
- Reflection on objects from the grass, the fabric, the grounds and the sky.
- Patches of light on hair,
- The light appears through fingers.
Has finished painting an arrow.

Rybakova_Olga
06-17-2008, 04:16 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-Jun-2008/144896-rybakova_olga_amur9_1.jpghttp://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-Jun-2008/144896-rybakova_olga_amur9_2.jpg
Here especially well it is visible fingers.
In a picture not such is bright-blue wings, as on a photo. They almost white, with an easy blue and violet cold shade. As there are easy reflections of wings on a back, hair. Nostrils too should appear through pink.
Now the picture dries before a covering a varnish.
I Hope, it was interesting to you.:cat:

dollardays
06-17-2008, 11:32 PM
I loved seeing this process, Olga. Thank you for sharing it. You have mastered this layering technique and the painting you have now is a treasure! :) Nora

LeeLynch
06-18-2008, 09:42 AM
This is brilliant, Olga. You are a wonderful painter!

Thank you for sharing your layering technique, it is similar to what I am using now.
I do not speak Russian, but I know those words:)

Rybakova_Olga
06-18-2008, 12:43 PM
Thanks! :) It's very pleasant to me.
Now i finish copy from Alma-Tadema's picture
and the beginnings of next Bouguereau.
:) LeeLynch, what words? :))

LeeLynch
06-18-2008, 02:19 PM
I have seen the Russian words for the layers (Podmalyovok, etc...) in Alexei Antonov's lessons.

He is also very good:

http://www.artpapa.com/html/Free_Lessons_Green_apple.html

Please post more of your work as you finish it!

china doll
06-30-2008, 12:55 AM
Olga, I really love your work. You really captured this one.

AS a curiosity, I used to live in Moscow ('93 to '96 and '99 to 2003) and first started painting while there, but my style is more Russian Impressionism. I loved Moscow's art culture - the museums, the painters, the architecture.

Rybakova_Olga
07-01-2008, 08:23 AM
To LeeLynch : Ok, i will post more later. :)
To China doll: I love this to, and i like the China architecture too, and i dream to trip to China. I know you have whole cities of painters, and you make copies quickly very much, i want to see so factory. The Bouguereaus i was painting 6 months. I want to see different technics.

china doll
07-01-2008, 04:42 PM
Well, I am American living in China. I have been to some of the factories, and as an artist, they are amazing and disappointing. Many are actually painted like an assembly line. Artist #1 does the pale blue sky ground. Artist # 2 adds the Yellow ochre foreground ground. Artist # 3 adds two burnt umber tree trunks, etc. etc. You get my meaning. There is no "Art" involved, just mechanics. And it shows in the final work. But in the same villages there are also talented people whose work does not get the talent it deserves. In Guangzhou, where I live, there are some wonderful creative young artists. I actually enjoy the student work far more. :)

Rybakova_Olga
07-04-2008, 01:46 AM
It is very interesting. China doll, have you trip for to see technics of some painting of different country?
I want to go to Chine for this and Holland.
I saw surprising works in museums of Vatican. The artist paints a wall "grizayl"(umbra-white), and shadows in figure coincide with shadows from a window and figure looks like the sculpture - or bas-relief.
And i know interesting autor, the image from a frame as though overhangs on a wall, because he paint frame of that In that foreshortening and lighting, as a sight of the spectator at a wall.
I hope you understand something from "my english"? :))

gwenda
07-09-2008, 09:59 PM
congradulations,Olga! How long have you been painting?
Spectacular work. Thanks for sharing. Gwen



1

LeeLynch
07-10-2008, 11:58 AM
Olga, is that you in your avatar? If so, you must have very good hearing!
:)

TurkeyVulture
07-10-2008, 01:46 PM
Wow, Olga! This is a stunning work and I loved seeing your whole process. Thank you so much for the instruction!

fan_of_klimt
07-10-2008, 02:31 PM
Am I missing something?

It is a good painting you did, but why is Bouguereau so popular on this board? He is a dime-a-dozen academic painter from the 19th century, I am just confused why all of you guys are so high on him out of all the French academic painters you could choose to emulate?

Rybakova_Olga
07-10-2008, 03:02 PM
To Gwenda: I was painting 6 months, but not every day, because i paint some pictures simultaneously.
To LeeLynch: Yes. it's me. I perfectly hear, and a scent like the customs dog, and eyes like an eagle! ;)
To fan_of_klimt: I like his paintings, and it's good business. Write the list please, and i will to try to copy.
Now i have in working De Blaas and next Bouguereau, and Moreau.

LGHumphrey
07-10-2008, 05:32 PM
dime-a-dozen, eh?

Bringer
07-10-2008, 06:23 PM
Hi Olga,

Excellent painting.
Do you know the Artrenewal website ?
http://www.artrenewal.org/

Kind regards,

José

fan_of_klimt
07-10-2008, 07:46 PM
dime-a-dozen, eh?

Yep. Every single one of Ingres students for example, are extremely similar to Bouguereaus. Nearly every painter who came out of the French academies in those days was similar to Bouguereaus. I am just confused as to why this website has seemingly singled out Bouguereaus as it's academic, classical champion.

LeeLynch
07-10-2008, 11:05 PM
Yep. Every single one of Ingres students for example, are extremely similar to Bouguereaus. Nearly every painter who came out of the French academies in those days was similar to Bouguereaus. I am just confused as to why this website has seemingly singled out Bouguereaus as it's academic, classical champion.

Not "this site" so much as artists who admire great art.

Rybakova_Olga
07-11-2008, 02:17 AM
This picture unites an interesting plot, it makes thinking, beautiful bodies, is good for sale. By the way, yesterday the buyer has bought it. :)
I the commercial artist and me am important what to paint. Bouguereaus or not Bouguereaus-it is not important, the main thing that the picture was beautiful. :)

Please, offer other similar picture, else the conversation pointless.

www.artrenewal.com- i know, thanks.

Rybakova_Olga
07-11-2008, 02:19 AM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/10-Jul-2008/144896-rybakova_amur_scaachi.jpg
It's result.

LeeLynch
07-11-2008, 01:08 PM
Am I missing something?

It is a good painting you did, but why is Bouguereau so popular on this board? He is a dime-a-dozen academic painter from the 19th century, I am just confused why all of you guys are so high on him out of all the French academic painters you could choose to emulate?


This is a very common attack on the traditional realist painters of the 19th century, and it has no foundation. 20th century art took a major downhill direction, and this type if thinking became popular in order to try to add face value to the horrible paintings of artists like Matisse and Miro.

Sorry, but classical realism is back, and Bouguereau is one of the best painters ever to exist. He and the others of the French Academic circles brought traditional painting to it's height, using all the preceding knowledge gained over the centuries.

I know it's become the "cool" thing in current art trends to bash classical academia, but get back with me when you've painted a "dozen" those, in their original size, and let's see how well you do :)

fan_of_klimt
07-11-2008, 01:32 PM
Art didn't take a "major downhill direction", you just aren't looking in the right places. Have you ever heard of Frida Kahlo, Gustav Klimpt, Egon Scheile, Lucien Freud, Takashi Murakami or Kara Walker? They all were painters in the 20th century. The traditional realists have always been around, the just haven't gained international fame past a certain period of time.

You are also greatly mistaken if you believe Bouguereaus' work to be "natural realism". He idealizes his subjects in a non-realistic manner. His work, and the work of others of his ilk, is instead a pale attempt to immitate the classical style of the high rennaissance. If you want realists, look up Corot, Courbet or Velasquez. They were artists who painted in a realistic style and true to life. Bouguereaus has very good technique no doubt, but everything he has done has already been done before, by Poussin and the other artists of the High Rennaissance. Many of his compositions, such as his painting of Venus, seem contrived and frivolous to me. While I love mythological and classical subjects and paint them myself from time to time, you have to understand that that is not all that art is. A painting doesn't have to be dancing nymphs or a bible scene to be true art. Bouguereaus was a very gifted artist who had nothing really interesting to say, other than the fact that he liked other worldly harmony in his compositions, and he liked changing and idealizing the subjects in his imagery so evidently he didn't like what he really saw.

It is ok to admire Bouguereaus but it is foolish to discredit all art that was done over the past 100 years and put him on top of the pantheon of artistic acheivment. I don't understand how you can discredit painters like Takashi Murakami or Frida Kahlo just because they don't paint in the classical romanticized style of 19th centurey French academies.

LeeLynch
07-11-2008, 03:38 PM
You have some good points here, and I should stay away from some of the sweeping statements I make regarding 20th century art.

I was not trying to discredit every singe artist of the 20th century. Frida Kahlo and Murakami are certainly not to my own taste, and they aren't governed by the same goals as Bouguereau and his "ilk", as you say.

The ideas that you put forward about his work "all having been done before" or having been "pale imitations" of previous masters is just part of the fictional poison that many artists have been lead to believe as part of the modern art reprogramming throughout the 20th century.

These are all things that started being said about them by the early impressionists, and from the 1890's until now these canned arguments have somewhat persisted, passed along from one generation of artists to the next.

Thankfully, more and more people have revived the proper understanding of Bouguereau's work, and realize it's value. This is something that you and I may never agree on.

LeeLynch
07-11-2008, 04:36 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/10-Jul-2008/144896-rybakova_amur_scaachi.jpg
It's result.

This is beautiful, Olga!

fan_of_klimt
07-11-2008, 04:37 PM
You are right, we might not agree on this subject. For me, what is most attractive and beautiful to me is nature. Because everyone sees things from a different perspective, no artist can truly appeal to everyone. For example, Carvaggio can paint a bowl of fruit and make sure to accentuate and glorify every little brown patch and bruise. Bouguereaus could paint the same fruit and make them look like they were just freshly picked off the tree. I personally lean more towards Carvaggio's brand of realism than Bouguereaus. To me, like I said nature is the most beautiful thing in art to me, and Bouguereaus paintings, while I think he was a genius when it comes to technique and composition, seem unnatural to me, but I understand how to others his work can be the most beautiful thing they ever saw. I personally don't think that artists should try to improve nature. Than again I am a big fan of Turner, and his romanticized land scapes are far from realistic.

Everyone sees things from different perspectives, I am only 18 so I forget that some times.

LeeLynch
07-12-2008, 06:12 PM
Once again you make some good points, and I actually have to agree with you on idealism versus more realistic nature.

I think with Bouguereau it comes down to which paintings one observes. I much prefer paintings like "The Broken Pitcher" or "The Sheperdess" or "A Portrait of Léonie Bouguereau" to themes that include Cherubim etc. The realism of these paintings is true to life, and those beautiful young ladies are very likely as they really were.

I always applaud those who reproduce his paintings, whichever ones they choose, and their own originals can only benefit from the exercise.

Knappert
07-13-2008, 02:17 PM
You are right, we might not agree on this subject. For me, what is most attractive and beautiful to me is nature. Because everyone sees things from a different perspective, no artist can truly appeal to everyone. For example, Carvaggio can paint a bowl of fruit and make sure to accentuate and glorify every little brown patch and bruise. Bouguereaus could paint the same fruit and make them look like they were just freshly picked off the tree. I personally lean more towards Carvaggio's brand of realism than Bouguereaus. To me, like I said nature is the most beautiful thing in art to me, and Bouguereaus paintings, while I think he was a genius when it comes to technique and composition, seem unnatural to me, but I understand how to others his work can be the most beautiful thing they ever saw. I personally don't think that artists should try to improve nature. Than again I am a big fan of Turner, and his romanticized land scapes are far from realistic.

Everyone sees things from different perspectives, I am only 18 so I forget that some times.

You don't think artists should try to improve nature? I've always found this opinion quite odd, how do you think we as a species have come to civilisation, national healthcare, universities and the internet. By not trying to improve nature? The very act of painting is improving nature. Or did you think paint forms into bowls of bruised fruit on it's own accord. Paint doesn't even exist in 'nature.'

B. is exalted because of his brilliant technique and composition, skill in painting, regardless of 'what' he painted. Anyone can see he was a brilliant painter, one of the best no doubt. It is not about overlooking anyone, it is recognising that B. is a better 'painter' regardless of the subjective notions of art, artist or subject matter and recognising that copying his work leads to a greater skill on your own part. As he did Ingres or courbet did the Spanish 17th century artists.

B. was a far better 'painter' than Frida Kahlo or Takashi Murakami or Kara Walker or Egon Schiele. There, I said it.

Lucien Freud tends to waver between skill between paintings, but I'd put 'that' self portrait above most of B.'s paintings. As for Klimt, well, I wouldn't want to piss off John Malkovich. :lol:

Personally prefer Rubens and Rembrandt though.


Just remember, there is 'painting'(objective craft) and then there is 'art'(subjective). Hopefully that clears things up.

Gilberte
07-13-2008, 02:24 PM
You must have an academic degree in order to reproduce the great masters in this way. Would really love to see some of your own works and styles.
I often visit the site of the Leningrad art school. I do love these artists as well.
Good continuation and lots of appreciation for your knowhow !

P.S. the correct word is "grisaille" ...:wink2:

LGHumphrey
07-13-2008, 02:47 PM
Gilberte, are you talking about

http://www.leningradschool.com/

Carey Griffel
07-14-2008, 03:12 AM
My apologies for not having followed along this thread...what a beautiful work!

Rybakova Olga, you have a terrific copy of Bougereau and it is great to see your steps as you go along! Thank you for sharing your process and your work.

To the other posters in this thread: I'm afraid that the discussion has gotten out of hand and *entirely* inappropriate and disrespectful to the original poster and her work. Further discussion along this vein will not be tolerated in this thread.

Thanks.

~!Carey

Rybakova_Olga
07-14-2008, 08:22 AM
Carey , I like this dispute. Your debaters it is much more courageous, than on our sites.:)
Thanks for a compliment :)
To Gilberte - ok :).

Gilberte
07-14-2008, 08:25 AM
Gilberte, are you talking about

http://www.leningradschool.com/

Yes Sir !:)

biblioartist
07-14-2008, 09:43 AM
Wow, thank you so much for sharing that! Very instructive!

LeeLynch
07-14-2008, 10:06 AM
My apologies if I have strayed too far from the topic. I have sought in every way to remain respectful of Olga, and hope I have succeeded.

Rybakova_Olga
07-14-2008, 01:17 PM
:)) It was interesting. I have understood, that professionals here have gathered.

old thing
07-21-2008, 09:01 AM
This is fantastic the way you help others by showing your process. You are very gifted and thankfully good hearted too. Thankyou. I envy work like this.

nick that nobody has
07-21-2008, 08:38 PM
I'm just starting to learn the techniques of the old masters myself. This is a brilliant copy of Bouguereau. I would love to see your original work as well.

Rybakova_Olga
07-22-2008, 01:54 AM
Thanks for kind words. Similar works helped me to study with the past, now I help you. :)
My other works are here http://artnow.ru/en/gallery/206/4547.html
I have myself works a little, my specialization is copies.

wolfee
07-23-2008, 08:19 PM
:wave: Olga, I have just become a new member and am absolutely "awed" by your work and especially your generosity in sharing with us! I have been really so very interested in this technique and now I know how to proceed. Although I am sure my attempt will not in any way match your expertice! Again thank you for an invaluable lesson!
Wolfee

Rybakova_Olga
07-28-2008, 06:29 AM
I am glad, that the lesson is useful to you. :) If you will train much - you will overtake me!!!
:)

cjorgensen
07-31-2008, 11:26 PM
I just stumbled across this. Wow! Thank you so much for sharing this. It is so beautiful. Thanks again. :)

Rybakova_Olga
08-08-2008, 01:40 AM
:) Thanks. And next process i post here:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=511308

WFMartin
08-14-2008, 10:13 AM
This is a very common attack on the traditional realist painters of the 19th century, and it has no foundation. 20th century art took a major downhill direction, and this type if thinking became popular in order to try to add face value to the horrible paintings of artists like Matisse and Miro.

Sorry, but classical realism is back, and Bouguereau is one of the best painters ever to exist. He and the others of the French Academic circles brought traditional painting to it's height, using all the preceding knowledge gained over the centuries.

I know it's become the "cool" thing in current art trends to bash classical academia, but get back with me when you've painted a "dozen" those, in their original size, and let's see how well you do :)

Very, very well said!!

Bill

LeeLynch
08-21-2008, 10:57 PM
Thank you Bill!

I appreciate running into those who agree with my views, and I will take care to make sure that my perspective on this matter is more appropriately placed in the future.

I get riled up pretty easily, and should not have place that statement here in this fine lady's presentation.

(Nice to see another friend of the classical arts out there, and I like your work)

Wattano
08-25-2008, 11:25 PM
Thanks for sharing this.

Rybakova_Olga
09-03-2008, 11:40 AM
Thanks for attention. :)

hidemitadajp
09-07-2008, 10:50 AM
this original Bouguereau is one of my favorite. and I wanted to copy this. I will copy with following your way. because I am very intersted in your way. you are a great painter.

Rybakova_Olga
09-08-2008, 02:02 AM
Thanks :) .

SEE
09-17-2008, 01:24 PM
This is Wonderful!
Your work is amazing.
Thanks for showing the process I will certainly want to follow your next painting.

cjorgensen
10-19-2008, 11:12 AM
This is amazing. Thank you for sharing it with us.

tenebrae
11-06-2008, 12:56 AM
You are just amazing - thanks for sharing this

Kong
11-18-2008, 01:24 AM
You don't think artists should try to improve nature? I've always found this opinion quite odd, how do you think we as a species have come to civilisation, national healthcare, universities and the internet. By not trying to improve nature? The very act of painting is improving nature. Or did you think paint forms into bowls of bruised fruit on it's own accord. Paint doesn't even exist in 'nature.'

B. is exalted because of his brilliant technique and composition, skill in painting, regardless of 'what' he painted. Anyone can see he was a brilliant painter, one of the best no doubt. It is not about overlooking anyone, it is recognising that B. is a better 'painter' regardless of the subjective notions of art, artist or subject matter and recognising that copying his work leads to a greater skill on your own part. As he did Ingres or courbet did the Spanish 17th century artists.

B. was a far better 'painter' than Frida Kahlo or Takashi Murakami or Kara Walker or Egon Schiele. There, I said it.

Lucien Freud tends to waver between skill between paintings, but I'd put 'that' self portrait above most of B.'s paintings. As for Klimt, well, I wouldn't want to piss off John Malkovich. :lol:

Personally prefer Rubens and Rembrandt though.


Just remember, there is 'painting'(objective craft) and then there is 'art'(subjective). Hopefully that clears things up.

I'm with the young 18 year old fan_of_klimt (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/member.php?u=147358).
In my view there is nothing more handsome and varied than Nature.
Humans could never be as sophisticated as nature. We only mimic nature.
In order to represent nature you must work from nature.
Try to as you might, if you don't study your subject you'll be lost.
Go ahead, choose anything you'd like to paint, you'll be in big trouble making it up out of your head.

But then again maybe you don't actually paint.

Kong
11-18-2008, 01:37 AM
Carey , I like this dispute. Your debaters it is much more courageous, than on our sites.:)
Thanks for a compliment :)
To Gilberte - ok :).

Dear Rybakova_Olga, I think what your doing is admirable from an insatiably hungry student point of view.

It's a great way to learn. Many a student has sat for hours in the Louvre copying great master works of art. I have to some extent followed those same methods years ago.

With one so talented as you, I hope you eventually graduate towards your own artistic statements. With what I see here I'm sure you will. You are obviously a very sensitive talented creative force in your own right.

Studying and working from real life gives all of us more to work with. And a more convincing result.

p.s. You make a very convincing Bougi

jrgoddess
01-08-2009, 12:30 PM
One of my favorite paintings by him, and very impressed with how you copied it. Maybe one day I'll get around to doing "The Abduction of Psyche." But I'm too afraid of messing it up :(

scootypoot
01-15-2009, 09:50 PM
Olga, Do you do any work of your own? If so is it as go as what you copy?

Thujone
01-19-2009, 12:51 PM
Um. Wow. I simply look for posts by you Olga and just admire.

Rybakova_Olga
02-21-2009, 12:42 AM
I have two of own pictures only, i don't name etudes as pictures. I think this year I will paint more. :)

MSegev
04-09-2009, 03:59 AM
Olga, before I saw it with my own eyes, I didn't believe it was possible to create such a perfect reproduction. Prekrasno! (S uma soyti! Ya prosto obazhayu Bouguereau.)

kmobley
04-10-2009, 04:01 AM
Thank you for such a great post, I learned a lot.

Rybakova_Olga
04-19-2009, 12:26 AM
I have new pictures and it will a new post. :clap:

MSegev
04-23-2009, 09:27 AM
Olga, if you have more photographs, please post them, please please please! I'll be waiting.

Artbynan
04-29-2009, 11:17 PM
Olga,
Great job!!!
Where did you learned to paint so beautiful?
I'm a big fan of Bouguereaus!:clap:

Artbynan
04-29-2009, 11:18 PM
Olga,
Post some more images!!

Rybakova_Olga
05-13-2009, 05:53 AM
It were private lessons of holland technique and artpapa's lessons.
:)

Rybakova_Olga
06-03-2009, 02:28 PM
You can see next lesson of 7-layer Flemish techniques here http://www.ribakova.com/lessons?id=17
:thumbsup: :clap:

willpaintforever
10-15-2009, 11:04 AM
Hi olga

It is fantastic to see someone else using much the same process I have used for many years..the burnt or raw umber underpainting and the builiding of glazes. I love this process . it always feels like magic to me.. the coming to life of the image before me.. I love your work.

Alex Sunder
10-30-2009, 10:27 AM
Great painting, I dont know how I´ve seen it before... trully great skills here!

NancyMP
11-09-2009, 12:52 AM
Carey , I like this dispute. Your debaters it is much more courageous, than on our sites.:)
Thanks for a compliment :)
To Gilberte - ok :).

I am new to this site; I have used "What's on your Easel" extensively in order to gain knowledgeable criticism of my own work, which I appreciate very much. While I've painted for 50 years and more, I learn something every time someone expresses a different opinion. I see no danger in using freedom of speech to express our views as long as no derision is done: my views lie somewhere between the Fan of Klimt viewpoint and those of the gentleman from Dallas.

Having worked 40 years as a commercial artist, I believe in painting from reality rather than copying, but sometimes models are hard to get. And when I copy from reality, I am not a camera. Realism is always filtered through a human soul in every creative outlet, be it writing, painting or ballet.

Olga, I absolutely love what you have done, and I know your client must be enchanted with it. Your English is very understandable. I really appreciate your explanation of how you achieved this beautiful work over six months. The only time I get six months for a painting is when I'm commissioned for a portrait:wink2: ... and I really enjoy it!

Nancy:wave:
http://NancyParkFineArt.com

PS: The first painting in my signature strip below was done using the grisaille method.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Nov-2009/203830-Signature_Banner.jpg

pizzuti
11-10-2009, 04:33 PM
Beautiful work Olga, thanks so much for taking the time to post your process.

phillyjoepj
12-16-2009, 08:08 AM
Thanks! Great work. I'm still learning to layer up the translucent colors. your comments were helpful. Continue on !!!!

It would be fun to do an abstract of this painting; the energies would be fun to represent and depict!

Indeed, Cupid was the only god in the greek pantheon that ALL the gods were afraid of. LOVE can make you alternately overjoyed, wanting to live forever, and then completely suicidal-miserable! It's painfully evolutionary and part of the consciousness process. However, we all still want and love the innocent absolute sense of flight, of being swept away, a feeling which only love can provide.

Phil

cjorgensen
12-20-2009, 10:15 PM
Thank you so much for generously sharing your progress and knowledge with us. :) The painting is wonderful.

pameladallaire
01-02-2010, 06:06 PM
Absolutely beautiful!

Pam

Kellih
01-12-2010, 11:57 PM
You ARE a master! I should be ashamed to post a thing after this! But I already did . . :/ How do you keep the colors so uniform with perfect transitions? Do you thin color to a glaze with oils or liquin? blending with brushes or rags? Sorry for the many questions-your work is THAT impressive to me-and I love Bouguereaus! thanks for sharing your postings!!
kelli

Rybakova_Olga
04-26-2010, 04:30 PM
Hi! :clap: :clap: :clap:

This is new video about my last painting:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NUUUvmjINvE

Music, FX, HD-quality. :music: :thumbsup:

wal_t
05-02-2010, 05:55 AM
Olga, great work in this thread and thanks for posting these. Can you explain a bit more on how you start these paintings? Typically the first stage when you start the "lessons" are almost a finished piece of work already to my eye. Do you start with a pencil or charcoal drawing or straight away with paint? regards, Walter.

Painterdee
05-02-2010, 07:04 PM
Gorgeous! Thanks for sharing.

a42_elvis
05-15-2010, 05:13 PM
hello i want my painting send for you how send for you?

zeenjan
05-17-2010, 12:25 PM
I don't know anything about the art debate, but I do know that Rybakova Olga's rendition of the painting is beautiful. Beautiful

Rybakova_Olga
10-13-2010, 03:24 PM
"... Can you explain a bit more on how you start these paintings? Do you start with a pencil or charcoal drawing or straight away with paint? "
To wal_t :
When I paint a copy, I transfer a contour a carbon paper on a canvas. Then the contour disappears under several layers.
The contour appears through on an underpainting and almost disappears under a dead layer.
:) Now the painting in progress (http://www.ribakova.com/articles/7) are on the link.

Maria del Valle
10-15-2010, 06:00 PM
Super! This is great!:thumbsup:
I like so much!!!

Junier
08-30-2012, 06:15 AM
Great Work Olga! Thank you for posting the entire process.

Junier
08-30-2012, 06:16 AM
Hi! :clap: :clap: :clap:

This is new video about my last painting:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NUUUvmjINvE

Music, FX, HD-quality. :music: :thumbsup:

The link to the video is broken?

derek123
04-28-2013, 07:08 AM
nice pink versus green variation