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View Full Version : The Oil Gusher May 12 - May 18


Pat Isaac
05-15-2008, 07:21 AM
Good morning everyone,

We are up and running again.....:thumbsup: This thread was lost in the crash, but here it is again. It has been a productive week so far. I started 4 new paintings and have one in the works. I guess that will be it for the show.
We have been picking asparagus for a week now. Nothing like garden veggies.
So come in and share your joys, concerns...or just the day to day routine and lets get aquainted.

Have a great day:) :) :)

Pat

wabbitt
05-15-2008, 12:17 PM
Oh, yay, we're back :)

I was going to say...looks like we lost some posts in the crash...then I opened this thread to find out you had to start a whole new thread.

My drawing class is finally over so you'll be seeing more of my face soon. :lol: I was really impressed with the effort everyone else put into their project. I've been looking forward to the summer break for over a month but our teacher was really sad to see the end of class.

Mom's been feeling more energy lately so she planted peppers and lettuce and has been tending to that lately. The lettuce is doing great but the peppers are very slow. Too much effort for a little salad, if you ask me.

Scarefishcrow
05-15-2008, 01:04 PM
HELLO! HELLO?


Anybody here? Pat?

What's going on? I'm all alone here. I guess that's why it's fast.

There's no one here so I guess I'll go to bed.

_______________________Wendell


So....Wendell was the last one on before disaster set in???? Does that seem suspicious to anyone else? Perhaps found a way to get rid of your fruit flies?? Sent killer voles to the WC Servers?? Come on Wendell, fess up, what did you do to crash the system???


Julie.. Glad you are going to have some time to be around more. Happy your mom's doing better. Hope she continues to gain energy. Hope you enjoy your summer break!!! (And, did you really believe the teacher hated to see the class end??? Usually by the end of the year I was as tired as the students and starting to get spacey. I always needed that "down" time to get my batteries recharged!)

Pat...Are we running on the new system now?? is that why things sped up and crashed?? Early bugs to work out?

You are doing a great job and I'm sure the WC tech folks are eating lots of delivery pizza and drinking plenty of coffee. Big job they have been doing.:clap: :clap: :clap:

Scarefishcrow
05-15-2008, 01:18 PM
Re: The Oil Gusher May 5 - May 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pat Isaac
Not alone....WC has been down for me since Monday.....I guess it is working again.

Pat

Pat, Did we lose the Weekly OP Sketch Thread for this week?? I can find the Sketch Threads through May 5-11, but not this week's (May 12-18)? Or did I just overlook it?

Bill
__________________

Posted this by mistake in 5-11 Gusher so copied here.

Bill

Pat Isaac
05-15-2008, 01:56 PM
A summer break is always good. Hope you made out fine with the class, Julie.

Bill we are not on the new system yet, hopefully by the end of the month.
I lost the gusher, and I just checked. I don't see the sketch thread. I'll post it again.
Thanks.

Pat

Scarefishcrow
05-15-2008, 02:50 PM
A summer break is always good. Hope you made out fine with the class, Julie.

Bill we are not on the new system yet, hopefully by the end of the month.
I lost the gusher, and I just checked. I don't see the sketch thread. I'll post it again.
Thanks.

Pat

Thanks, Pat. Hope this isn't causing too many headaches for you. Just will make us appreciate the new system more!

Pat Isaac
05-15-2008, 03:32 PM
No problem, and I hope those who posted in it will post again.

Pat

Peiwend
05-15-2008, 06:38 PM
Sorry, Bill, but I was not the last poster before Wet Canvas went down. However, I was the first poster when it came back up. Maybe the voles ate the slugs in sluggish! Maybe they ate all the bugs! Today I saw a huge crow poking around the rocks where the voles are.

It's good to hear you're having a productive week, Pat.

I think I've outwitted the fruit flies by moving to the upstairs studio and working with odorless soft pastels for a while. Besides, the downstairs workspace is too messy and it's easier to move than clean it up.

Now, what do I do about all the goutweed?

_________________________Wendell

Pat Isaac
05-15-2008, 06:56 PM
Goutweed, I have not heard of that, but when I looked it up it said that it was part of the carrot family. It looks very similar to our Queen Ann's Lace. I love that in bouquets, and discovered some in my front garden a few years ago. I foolishly let it go and picked for flower arrangements. :eek: The next year my husband said "What is that? It's everywhere and looks like a carrot leaf...Sigh, I wanted to contain it, but every year I pull it up and now it is just about gone. A bird must have dropped the seed initially....so Wendell..pull it up...:D :evil:

Pat

Shirl Parker
05-16-2008, 08:59 AM
Bill, I thought you especially would enjoy reading this from Robert Genn's Twice-Weekly Letter

Johanna van Gogh

May 16, 2008

Dear Shirl,

Vincent van Gogh died in 1890. Theo van Gogh, art dealer and brother of Vincent, died six months later, in 1891. Johanna, Theo's wife, inherited all the shop remainders including virtually all of Vincent's work. She soon moved with her small son from Paris to Bussum near Amsterdam. Johanna, age 29, went into distribution mode.

Reading the brothers' correspondence, she became convinced of her brother-in-law's genius and set about to do the right thing by him. "I am living wholly with Theo and Vincent," she wrote in her diary, "Oh, the infinitely delicate, tender and loving quality of that relationship." Placing work in various commercial galleries in the Netherlands, she also arranged for the gifting of works to strategic museums. It was hard going at first--people laughed at Vincent's work. The critics were skeptical at best, but in the end her writings and her persistent, visionary advocacy fanned the Vincent flames. She typed and revised the Theo-Vincent letters, finally publishing many of them in Dutch in 1914. When she died in 1925, she was still working on letter 526. Johanna also assisted in publishing a handbook for detecting Vincent forgeries.

In the "all's well that ends well" story of artists' lives and successes, there are worthwhile prerequisites. Some artists try some of them so the fruits of their labour can be enjoyed while their creators are still walking around. Vincent, who never saw a guilder from his art, had benefit of all five of the prerequisites:

Distinctive, recognizable style
Limited supply (200, plus drawings)
Controlled distribution (one caring person in charge)
Story (failure, poverty, passion, health issues, ear-off)
Tragic, preferably early, end (shot himself)

A shot of nepotism helps too. The van Goghs and the Bongers (Johanna's maiden name) were educated, professional, well connected and upwardly mobile. Vincent was the black sheep. It was Vincent's publisher-uncle C. M. van Gogh who was first in print with Vincent's story. Another uncle designed the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam. Johanna was herself a sensitive, literate yet practical type who spoke and wrote beautifully in three languages. After thirty years of hard work, she finally and graciously consented to allow England's National Gallery to buy Vincent's "Sunflowers."

Best regards,

Robert

PS: "Everything is but a dream!" (Johanna van Gogh, 1891)

Esoterica: It may take bereavement, another generation, or a canny dealer to see preciousness and perhaps value in a body of work. The combination of hoarding and distribution is part of the art. Work should not be too readily released or made commonly available to just anyone. Stratospheric prices come after the groundwork is laid. After that, as in the National Gallery, "Sunflowers" are now made available on mugs, calendars, shirts and brassieres. Theo and Vincent now lie side by side in the cemetery at Auvers-sur-Oise. If those two idealists hear about those mugs, they'll be rotisserating in their graves.

Pat Isaac
05-16-2008, 09:05 AM
Thanks, Shirl. You beat me to it. I just received that in my email. Interesting.

Pat

Scarefishcrow
05-16-2008, 10:24 AM
Shirl.. Thanks for sharing that. Yes, Theo's widow was instrumental in shaping opinion of Van Gogh's work both as a legacy to Vincent AND Theo. Theo loved his brother dearly, rushing to his side and staying with him the two days it took him to die. I don't know about a guilder, but Vincent did sell 1 painting during his life I read recently. However, it is difficult to disentangle the genius of Vincent's work from the dedication, constant support, and inspiration that he provided Vincent. In many ways, while Vincent's hand moved the brush, I have always felt that the spirit of Theo was in each brushstroke as the two loved one another very much. Vincent drew much strength and endurance from Theo and IMHO would have died even earlier had it not been for Theo's interventions. I think it a melanchology statement on the bond between them that forged what today has become an essential icon of art itself that Theo survived his brother by only six month's and they lie side by side in death as they stood side by side in life.

Van Gogh was accutely aware of what he had done and wanted to die. Not the act of a madman, to the contrary he told Theo he must die or it would simply have to be done again. It is sad that the torment he must have suffered could tody be most likely dealt with relatively easily. But the question is, without the torment that drove him, would he have produced the same profound and almost uniquely identifiable art he did??

I don't know if I should tell you this, but on our trip to Russia we purchased the requisit MATRYOSHKA DOLLS. If not familiar with the tradition, see the following:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matrushka_doll

We found unique ones a street vendor had that were painted with images from various artists. We bought one for my stepdaughter with Gustav Klimt and for me, what else, VAN GOGH.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-May-2008/108067-vgd1.gif http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-May-2008/108067-vgd2.gif

I am fighting this urge to paint the second photo and give it a title something like "Inside Van Gogh" or "Van Gogh Come Apart":lol: :lol:

Thanks for sharing the info.

BILL

Scarefishcrow
05-16-2008, 10:34 AM
Sorry, Bill, but I was not the last poster before Wet Canvas went down. However, I was the first poster when it came back up. Maybe the voles ate the slugs in sluggish! Maybe they ate all the bugs! Today I saw a huge crow poking around the rocks where the voles are.

It's good to hear you're having a productive week, Pat.

I think I've outwitted the fruit flies by moving to the upstairs studio and working with odorless soft pastels for a while. Besides, the downstairs workspace is too messy and it's easier to move than clean it up.

Now, what do I do about all the goutweed?

_________________________Wendell

My suggestion, Wendell, is don't eat it. Since gout is caused by excessive protein that forms uric acid crystals in your joints, I suggest a reduced regimen of protein for your garden! The weeds will still be there but they shouldn't have GOUT! :angel: :angel:

Helpful, as always;
Your faithful servant,

Bill

PS:Who IS that drunk looking old guy sprawled out on the steps right smack dab in the middle of Raphael's "School of Athens"?????? (Oooooooh. The temptation. No. I'll leave it at a question!:smug:

starblue
05-16-2008, 01:09 PM
Genn's Van Gogh "limited supply" number is wrong: he painted over 850 paintings, over 1000 drawings, 150 watercolors, and wrote over 850 letters. What was limited was the distribution. You can view the stats and works (http://www.vggallery.com/index.html)for yourself.

Shirl Parker
05-16-2008, 01:30 PM
Bob, send him an email disputing his facts. [email protected]

Scarefishcrow
05-16-2008, 03:14 PM
Genn's Van Gogh "limited supply" number is wrong: he painted over 850 paintings, over 1000 drawings, 150 watercolors, and wrote over 850 letters. What was limited was the distribution. You can view the stats and works (http://www.vggallery.com/index.html)for yourself.

Bob, I agree with you. Considering that his entire working life as an artist from beginning to end was quite short compared to say, Renoir or Picasso, or Monet, and many others. It would be interesting to look at the rate of output given his short life and late start in painting.
He really didn't begin to seriously study art til around 1880 and probably somewhere around 1885 began producing most of what we today consider his productive period. Since he died in 1890, then the majority of the numbers you cite were produced in about a 5 year period. (I hope I did my quick math and dates right from memory).


Many people seem to think VG simply whipped out these canvases without thought. You quite rightly point out he produced prodigous and incredibly detailed sketched often in sepia ink and pen with light wash and would often send these to Theo describing them in detail. For his short career he was incredibly prolific. And many of his drawing, particularly the ink and wash ones, are so beautiful and have as disticntive a sketching style as was his painting technique. He worked incredibly hard and long hours to produce works he carefully planned in most cases even though they don't give evidence of that (according to Micahelangelo the real test of of piece of artwork; hard work resulting in something that appears to have been produced effortlessly).

Thanks for picking up on that Bob. Being relatively familiar with the story of his life and that of Theo's wife I had not read that carefully.

Very little slips by your Eagle Eyes!!!!:thumbsup:

Shirl, thanks again for the info.

starblue
05-16-2008, 04:21 PM
Bob, I agree with you. Considering that his entire working life as an artist from beginning to end was quite short compared to say, Renoir or Picasso, or Monet, and many others. It would be interesting to look at the rate of output given his short life and late start in painting.
He really didn't begin to seriously study art til around 1880 and probably somewhere around 1885 began producing most of what we today consider his productive period. Since he died in 1890, then the majority of the numbers you cite were produced in about a 5 year period. (I hope I did my quick math and dates right from memory).

Bill, I wrote the following essay blurb for another context but it directly addresses the above point. Clearly he had excellent time-management skills.

I hadn’t known about Van Gogh’s diligence, persistence, and strong work ethic. He said “he plowed his canvas like the farmers plowed their fields”. His career lasted just 10 years, during which he produced 870 paintings. If you calculate it out, that’s one painting every 4.1 days. In his last 2 months he created 80 paintings, better than one a day. Impressive statistics though they sound, consider the following. During the first 3 years of his career he could only rarely afford to buy oil paints. Since he believed you had to know how to draw before you could paint, there are even more drawings than paintings, particularly in the early years where his circumstances made a virtue out of necessity, and even afterwards when he could paint regularly, he often first did highly detailed drawings in ink on large sheets of paper as preparatory studies for his paintings. In other words, he spent as much, if not more, time drawing than painting. Yet somehow he still had time left over to write all those lengthy letters to his brother Theo (which also number in the hundreds, many of which contain sketches of his surroundings, of works underway, or of ideas for future paintings) and still more letters to other relatives and artist-friends. And there were days or weeks, when he visited friends or crawled the Paris art galleries or was laid up in a hospital or mental asylum, when he drew or painted nothing. Therefore, when he did work, his output had to have been even more frenzied than the averages above indicate. His concentration powers and endurance levels must have been formidable.

Scarefishcrow
05-16-2008, 07:10 PM
Bob,
An excellent piece of writing and you really captured the sense of what I was trying to say. I have so much regard for someone considered "mad" or "unbalanced". Perhaps it was through his art he came closest to peace and purging himself, at least for a time, of his demons. One hopes that is the case for someone that worked so hard for such a short frenzied period and, like Elton John's "Norma Jean", his candle went out long before his legend ever did (or in this case probably NEVER WILL).

Thanks a lot for sharing this.

Bill