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magsme
05-03-2008, 03:56 AM
Is there anyone out there with experience of using these two together, who may have helpful suggestions. I am always on the look out for new techniques with acryls and oils.
Cheers, Mags

AnnieA
05-03-2008, 10:51 AM
Mags: Welcome to the OP Forum! :wave:

I've never tried it myself, but I know our forum moderator, Pat Isaac, has used OP over oils frequently, and successfully, as have a few others who post here. I think the only thing to look out for is to make sure the oil paint has thoroughly dried before applying the OP.

Pat Isaac
05-03-2008, 04:33 PM
Hi Mags, and welcome to the OP forum. :wave: I moved this to our talk thread as I felt you would get more comments.
I frequently use and oil base for my OPs. I use it as an underpainting, a very thin layer of paint with some lights and darks suggested. When the paint is dry I build up the painting with OPs. I have found this works well for me and I usually use this technique when I am painting on board.
Here is a thread of an OP I did over oil paint.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=393213

Pat

Scarefishcrow
05-03-2008, 08:30 PM
Annie and Pat are far more experienced than I and have given you some good advice. Just wanted to welcome you to the OP forum :wave: . You won't find a better bunch of folks that always are ready to help. Look forward to seeing some of your work when you decide to post or take part in some of the challenges or sketch threads. There are some links in my signature line if you are new to WetCanvas or OP. Take a look if you think they might help.

Again, welcome. It is always great to find someone new exploring the exciting possibilities of OP!

Bill

Shirl Parker
05-07-2008, 06:26 PM
Hi Mags, I haven't used OP over oil, but I did use watercolor on colorfix for an underpainting. It works really well, and it dries quickly, unlike oil.

tubbekans
05-16-2008, 08:03 AM
Mary (Mlelevir) a mod over in Mixed Media/Alt materials forum does some very nice encasutic style abstracts with wax and oil paint. I don't know specific names but it seems like there are some other people over there who do use OP with other media.

Leo1903
06-06-2008, 07:29 PM
I've experimented mixing these two mediums twice, using different techniques:

The first time 4 years ago, I did a plein air using oil pastels as an under painting, followed by painting over the top of it with oil paints back home. I thought that OP would be handier than oils in getting down my pallet colours out in the field.

I know that this technique is not recommended as the nondrying oils in OP blend into the drying type oil in oil paints. However, after 4 years, the painting seems to be holding up pretty well and I see no signs of deteriation.

Recently, I experimented with attempting to salvage a failed oil painting by painting overtop with OP. This was not all that successful because the dried oil painting's surface texture was difficult to fill properly with OP.

Leo

CarlyHardy
07-23-2008, 11:31 AM
You might like to take a look at Tom Jensen's website. He uses oil pastels over his oil paintings, but he also uses his own varnishing technique to seal the entire painting. He was featured in an International Artist magazine last year (don't recall issue). And this year he is the judge for the Oil Pastel Society's Member Show!

His paintings are at www.tomjensenart.com

carly

Scarefishcrow
07-23-2008, 12:14 PM
Carly,

Thanks for bringing this artist and the information to our attention. You didn't mention it, but if you follow the link given, at the bottom is this link to a Blog with a two part (52 & 24 minutes) live phone interview with Tom discussing a variety of topics relating to his view of art and how his approach to it is evolving. It can be downloaded and loaded onto an mp3 player if you wish to listen to it later.

Chris Bolmeier Art Blog
March 2008 Interview (http://christerical.blogspot.com/2008/03/tom-jensen-interview.html) (With Tom Jensen)

i know OPS (Oil Pastel Society) keeps you pretty busy, but it is nice to see you around. Hope you can stop by more often!

Thanks.

BILL:thumbsup:

CarlyHardy
07-29-2008, 10:24 PM
Bill,
thanks for the link to the interview! In corresponding with Tom, I've found him to be very open with his techniques and willing to share with other artists. He's promised to do an article for the Oil Spiel "when he gets the time to do it". I promised to hold him to it!

again thanks,
carly

Scarefishcrow
07-30-2008, 10:54 AM
Bill,
thanks for the link to the interview! In corresponding with Tom, I've found him to be very open with his techniques and willing to share with other artists. He's promised to do an article for the Oil Spiel "when he gets the time to do it". I promised to hold him to it!

again thanks,
carly

I'm sure the OPS members will look forward to that contribution, Carly.

Bill:thumbsup:

Pat Isaac
07-30-2008, 11:11 AM
I'm already looking forward to it.

Pat

Finnegan18
07-31-2008, 11:51 AM
Hi Mags, and welcome to the OP forum. :wave: I moved this to our talk thread as I felt you would get more comments.
I frequently use and oil base for my OPs. I use it as an underpainting, a very thin layer of paint with some lights and darks suggested. When the paint is dry I build up the painting with OPs. I have found this works well for me and I usually use this technique when I am painting on board.
Here is a thread of an OP I did over oil paint.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=393213

Pat


Do you varnish your works that combine OP and Oil?

Pat Isaac
07-31-2008, 11:59 AM
Hi Lisa, Welcome...:wave:
No I don't not varnish the OPs as they never really dry. I always frame them under glass as a means of protection. I have not really heard of a satisfactory protective coat for OPs, so I am a little nervous about framing them without glass.

Do you use oil pastels?

Pat

Scarefishcrow
07-31-2008, 04:06 PM
Lisa,

Hello again. Looks like Pat had the same question I left in the Richard Schmid thread.

You would surely do some interesting work with your great diversity of experience.

Bill

Finnegan18
07-31-2008, 07:16 PM
I just started with Oil Pastels. I have had them in my art stash for awhile and have been experimenting. I really loved the way they handled. Yet, three coats of fixative later they are still tacky. In fact, I suspect I could wipe the paper clean if I had a mind too. I used Vellum which does not appear to be absorbent in the way, say, watercolor paper would be. I do not plan to frame it so I am ordering some glassine which I will put between each new OP work and simply stack them where they won't be disturbed. Hey, if I mangage something great I will frame that. In the meantime, I guess the best thing is to spray them and stack them with a barrier in between.

Scarefishcrow
07-31-2008, 08:27 PM
You have struck upon one of the more defining traits of OP. You see they are made with a non-siccative (non-drying) mineral oil rather than the vegetable based siccative oils (like linseed, walnut, poppy, etc) that oxidize (not really dry) and form a nonreversible chemical change that makes them form a durable surface.

In theory, OP's never completly "dry" thogh they do set up with time and harden. Most OPist frame under glass. There are fixatives, but some people do not like the high gloss coat they tend to leave.

There is a relatively recent hybrid form called Extra Greasy Oil Pastel that is somewhat a cross between oil pastel and oil sticks. They are similar in size and shape to oil stick, but firmer and mad with linseed oil that does "dry". They are available, along with oil sticks and many other raw materials, from an artist founded and run company in Montreal called

http://www.kamapigments.com

(It is a bilingual site if it comes up in french you can switch to english).

A US companion site is

http://www.pigmentsplus.com

Here is a thread that discusses them (I recommend starting at the beginning...
http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=477623&highlight=egop
As a watercolorist you might be interested in the variety of watersoluble waxy OP's avaailable, one I recently purchased that seems less waxy than most and more like an OP is Cretacolor Aquastic; brilliant color when it dissolves. The other most common forms are Caran d'Ache NeoColor II (not I) and NeoArt lines.

Enough for now. Just start a thread and ask questions you might have. There is also a general, nonspecific thread called the Oil Gusher where we talk about any and everything.


Sure hope to see you around, Lisa.

Bill:thumbsup:

Finnegan18
08-01-2008, 11:59 AM
I have some oil sticks and the Cretacolor Aquastics too. I have used the oil sticks but not the Cretacolor Aquastics. I am starting to feel like an art junkie. My husband buys me art supplies for Christmas presents, and really any gift-giving ocassion. Actually everyone I know realizes that the best thing to give me is either some sort of art supplies or something they have found on the ground - feathers, driftwood, bits of metal, really anything interesting looking. One of my favorite gifts was an eyeball straw that my best friend "knew" I would love. Anyway, I am well-stocked. I also buy art supplies myself - Dickblick is my favorite source. I digress. I will try the papers I have that are more suited to OPs and will actually use more of my art stash. I am not going to buy the hybrid pencil however, and I don't need that sort of encouragement. :angel: My studio is pretty well-stocked as it is. Thanks for the information. When the OPs set up and harden are they dry to the touch as Oil Paint is after a day or more? How long does it take to make them set up? Will using a more absorbent paper shorten this time?

Pat Isaac
08-01-2008, 12:13 PM
OPs are never as dry as oil paint. They do harden and cure over time, but still can be scratched into. Setting up time depends on the amount of layers you have. I usually end up with a lot of layers and then have to let the painting set up over night or even a few days if the weather is hot before I can work on it again. I would be careful of the absorbent papers as the oil seeps through to the back. I'd try what you have and see what works for you.

Pat

GhettoDaveyHavok
08-10-2008, 10:39 PM
Welcome to the oil pastel forum magsme!

I was just getting done reading these replies (god, I hate reading :lol: ) I never used oil pastels over the oil paintings, but as Pat said about the oil paint as an under paint, I am sure it is fine to do. Plus, maybe it's just me, when I do oil paintings (yes, oil paint), I put on a first layer and I can still see through the paint and I would need another layer right? Well, OK maybe it's the oil paints I use, but yeah. I use acrylic for an under painting so I don't have to wait for my oil to dry and do another layer. But as I said, probably my oil paint brand... I am sure that it is also similar to the oil pastel going over an under lying of oil paint. You won't have to apply some other layer over it... But then again, I don't know about it since I never used certain oil pastels.

Pat Isaac
08-11-2008, 08:30 AM
When I use an oil paint underpainting, the oil paint is very thin. I thin it with thinner so it will dry faster, usually overnight. So it may not be the kind of oil paint you use, Crystal, just used thinly.

Pat

GhettoDaveyHavok
08-11-2008, 01:44 PM
When I use an oil paint underpainting, the oil paint is very thin. I thin it with thinner so it will dry faster, usually overnight. So it may not be the kind of oil paint you use, Crystal, just used thinly.

Pat

Hey, turpentine can be used to thin the oil paint and dry quicker also right? I could have sweared turptntine was also to use for thinning paint (I haven't used turpentine in a while since I usually paint indoors and wiping off my brushes... My parents hate it when I come in the house with smelly brushes:evil:).

Finnegan18
08-11-2008, 01:48 PM
I let my second OP work dry for a few days before I sprayed fixative on it and this one appears to be dry to a light touch. I think I sprayed my first work immediately which is something I won't do in the future.

Scarefishcrow
08-11-2008, 03:48 PM
Hey, turpentine can be used to thin the oil paint and dry quicker also right? I could have sweared turptntine was also to use for thinning paint (I haven't used turpentine in a while since I usually paint indoors and wiping off my brushes... My parents hate it when I come in the house with smelly brushes:evil:).


Crystal,

you might be interested in this post I made talking about using shavings from OP and solvents. The solvent I used for the nonwatersoluble ones is something like the Sansodor bottle shown. There are a variety of low to nearly no oder mineral spirit thiners that act as replacement for turpentine. There are even turpenoid compounds from citrus that smell like orange and are less toxic.

Just for you infomation:



Things you can do with OP shavings. (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showpost.php?p=7038185&postcount=55)


Perhaps this can be an alternative solvent if turpentine is a problem.

Bill:thumbsup:

Pat Isaac
08-11-2008, 04:46 PM
I seem to be having trouble with posts going through. I'll try again.
Lisa, what kind of fix did you use? Is the painting totally dry so that no fingernails or sharp objects would not damage the painting? Really curious about this.
Crystal, I use odorless mineral spirits, but you can use turpentine.

Pat

GhettoDaveyHavok
08-11-2008, 05:16 PM
Thanks for the link, Bill! I don't think I ran into that link yet until now! :lol: That sounds awesome...

I have no more turpentine though!:eek: :eek: :eek: :eek:

:crying: :crying: :crying: :crying:

...I'LL GET MORE!

...I think I'll try it with Crayola crayons, too. :lol:

Pat, you use the odorless stuff?

...I hope you still stay in a well-ventilated area :lol:

...I love the smell of turpentine.

Finnegan18
08-12-2008, 12:10 PM
Pat, i used Sennelier fixative - I applied four coats.

Pat Isaac
08-12-2008, 12:28 PM
Thanks, Lisa. Could this be framed without glass?

Pat

Finnegan18
08-12-2008, 01:12 PM
Pat, I don't know if it would be something you could use as a final proctive coat and forgo glass. My work is on paper so I would have to frame that. I don't have the can in front of me (we are out of town) but I think it is meant a light protection against dust. If you go to Dickblick.com and type it in you can read about what it can be used for. I would go and find a link for you and post it here but I am barely able to use this computer without losing my link. I have to keep logging back on to the hotel's access code.

Pat Isaac
08-12-2008, 03:05 PM
Thanks, Lisa. You dont have to get a link as I have some of that fix, but never liked the shine. I think you are right and that was my thought also. A protection against dust.

Pat